Why washbasins are useless and obsolete

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Shh hand to lips
It’s no secret – and it’s time we talked about this

No, no, not the washbasin you have in the bathroom at home.

How else are you going to do your teeth, rinse your hair – and all the thousand and one other things that require your ingenuity?

In the big wide world

Away from home though, is a different matter – the washbasins you encounter at work, in the shopping mall, at the airport – and let’s not forget motorway services.

Yes, we can feel that disapproving look. Not your best experience, eh?

Because even in the poshest designer washrooms, it seems this is an issue we’ve never got right. Those washbasins are as much of a switch-off as anything else.

Not to look at – they probably reek Italian chic.

We mean to actually use – to stand in front of the thing and do what you’re supposed to do.

Wash your hands.

Won’t, or don’t?

We’re beginning to understand now why this is an issue so many of us brush aside. Hence the same shocking statistics we’re always banging on about:

We’re not thinking this right, are we? Not addressing the REAL problem.

For which we’re really sorry – we owe you and ourselves a massive apology.

Just try actually washing your hands in any of these away from home washroom places, and you’ll see why. Yeah, they look very swish and impressive, but did anyone ever follow this thing through?

Let’s start with the plug.

Uh huh, usually there isn’t one. Back in the day, people used to swipe them – but nowadays that’s to encourage you to put your hands under running water – more convenient, more hygienic. They even have infrared sensors, so the taps switch on automatically – no touching anything, just hold your hands underneath.

Messy, messy

Problem right there.

Although you’re holding your hands over this large dish-shaped catch area, the water cascades off the back of your hands, slooshing onto the vanity slab around the basin as you move them about.

And if you’re the type who wets your hands before applying soap, you’ll also find water dripping everywhere as you reach for the dispenser.

OK, now you’re into it and getting energetic, working your fingers every which way and over the backs of your hands too. Lots more watery splatter – over the vanity slab and onto the mirror behind.

You might also find, as you move your hands back and forth, that the taps are a little too enthusiastic – water slooshes out of the front of the basin over your clothes – or onto the floor if you’re quick enough to see it coming and step back sharpish.

Right, you’re done and you rinse the soap away – awkwardly at arm’s length to avoid the puddle of water at your feet. Tiles, slippery, accident waiting to happen. Bad, Jim.

The drying nightmare

Your hands are wet, and your next problem is getting them dry. And when we say wet, we mean sopping – they’ve just been under the tap.

So what’s the first thing you do?

Instinctive this – you shake off the excess, just like that wonderful and brilliant man Joe Smith shows us we should.

Yeah, shake it off – just like the family dog. More water splatter, all over the place – and as we’ve observed elsewhere, with germs of all kinds in the drops.

Now you’ve got to dry yourself. But not at the vanity slab you won’t.

Any paper towel stacked on there will be an awful soggy mess. So somewhere else there’s a machine fixed to the wall – either a paper towel dispenser or one of those jet turbine blow jobs. Or worse, a clunka-chunka pull-down linen towel – already wet from other people.

Not the most enjoyable experience of your life, right?

The Ew! factor

Because do you feel clean and refreshed, or somehow short-changed and tainted? The same way you might feel if the actual loo you tried to use stank of noisesome nastiness, and hadn’t been flushed in six months?

Hoo boy! No wonder so many people don’t wash their hands after going to the loo. Or should we say AVOID washing their hands after going to the loo?

Because how would YOU shape up to it – sopping vanity slab, water splatters all around, a spreading puddle on the floor underneath? If you could avoid it, you would, right?

Which why we say that washbasins are useless and obsolete – fine for the Nineteenth Century, but the way of the dodo now.

Waterless sanitising

Because the alternative that already exists – and we all know about – is to avoid yuckiness altogether and use a sanitising gel.

No water to splatter around, spreading more germs than we wash off – no problem with drying.

One quick squidge and we’re away, wiggling it round our fingers until it evaporates. Healthy, hygienic – what’s the problem?

Getting it to you at the right time of course, making it easy to use too.

Your hands have icky stuff on them, yes? So you don’t want to touch anything.

So there needs to be an automatic squidger right there at the loo, to dispense the stuff onto your hands before you move away. One of those infrared sensor thingies could do the job – let it squirt out a handful from underneath one of them.

OK, now you move away, fingers already working the gel. By the time you get to the door, your hands are already dry. And there’s no germs on the handle when you touch it – the INSIDE one, that is – because everybody else’s hands are germ-free too.

Washbasins, yuck.

In this still new and shining Twenty-First Century, why do we still put up with them?

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Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 13 October 2018 @ 6:39 pm

Originally posted on 13 October 2018 @ 6:39 pm