Tag Archives: NHS

How to make 95% of your illnesses go away

Girl showing off hands
Wash your hands regularly and you
need never go to hospital again

A few ground rules.

Let’s not include upsets caused by your mind. No romantic distresses, job apprehensions, exam nerves or stress-related angst.

We’re talking genuine sicknesses here – like colds, flu or worse. Or tummy bugs that might start with diarrhoea and get nasty from there.

Yeah, you got gut ache

All the way from mild discomfort to hospital stuff – including monsters like typhoid. Pretty well anything you can eat or touch.

Are you ready?

Wash your hands.

That’s it. Just, wash your hands.

Ah, but you’ve got to do it properly. Because though all of us claim we wash our hands, 95% of us don’t do it properly, or even at all.

Don’t believe it?

Researchers at Michigan State University hid in bathrooms and recorded physical evidence. Seems most of us waggle our hands under the tap and that’s it.

Ah, but that’s Yanks, you say. We know better here.

Oh yeah? According to a recent survey right here in UK, 62% of men and 40% of women admitted that they didn’t even bother.

Uh huh. So that’s a whole bunch of us waltzing round with poo and wee on our hands.

You ready for the next yucky? We’re not just waltzing around, but we’re touching our faces 2,000 – 3,000 times a day. Transferring invisible gunk to our eyes, mouth and nose – exactly the same passages germs use to get in – over and over, like we WANT to catch a bug.

Go away, bugs!

Which makes it kind of unsurprising when we do. We’re so unhygienic we DESERVE to come down with something – at least norovirus or one of those other nasties that gives us the runs.

Worse than that, we use those same yucky hands to eat. Sure, they don’t look yucky, but those billions of viruses and bacteria living on there are so small, how the hell would we know?

OK, so you’re ambitious and pushing your career, so busy you often eat at your desk – burger and chips while you check your business pitches – multi-tasking so your bosses love you.

You got it – those same greasy fingers all over your keyboard and phone.

And when was the last time you wiped either of them down – last week, last month, last year? So that’s burger and chips on top of the chicken fajitas from yesterday, and the egg salad mayonnaise on wholewheat from the day before.

No wonder experts reckon you’ve got upwards of 10 million disease-causing bacteria living there – that place is a zoo!

Run to the Doc

So who’s fault is it if one of these bugs riding round on your hands decides to hit you with an infection? You and the other 65 million people living in bonny UK – all gumming up the works to see your GP, or running to A&E with your tummy bug because you can’t get an appointment?

And we have the nerve to say that our NHS services can’t cope!

With not even a guilty conscience that all we have to do is use a little soap and water after the loo and before eating to make all those ailments go away. Aren’t we heartily ashamed of ourselves?

We should be. So to pull our thinking straight about something we all know, here’s a polite hand-washing reminder from America’s health heavyweights, the Centers for Disease Control – the same people who safeguard the world against Ebola, malaria, TB, diabetes and all the other more serious challenges or doctors are fighting with every day.

Easy, huh?

Just wash your hands and everything goes away. (Tweet this)

No probs

You don’t have to buy Imodium because your tummy’s fine. Or get the Doc to check your chest because your lungs are clear. Or have your appendix removed because it’s fine.

Super-boring, nothing to talk about, and you should live to be a hundred.

Not allergic to soap are you? So use a sanitising gel. Carry one with you always, because you can’t always get to a bathroom.

Mind how you go though, clean hands can’t protect you from accidents.

Originally posted 2015-05-13 14:46:59.

You’re already covered in germs, so why aren’t you sick?

Saisfied girl
If your hands are clean, you’re safe for life!

Germs are everywhere.

Outside you, all over your body.

Inside you too – as much as 6 pounds of them. Smaller than the eye can see, which means billions and billions. Like, more than 60 billion in your mouth alone – more than the number of people on Earth.

Yes, you’re covered in germs – and you’re still walking around, happy as Larry.

Living with danger

First off, your immune system is up and running, keeping you out of trouble. Like a Star Trek force-field, it prevents infections happening before they start.

That cut on your hand, for instance. It bled a bit, so you sucked at it until it stopped. Maybe washed it, but that made it bleed more. So you held a tissue over it before it stopped you doing stuff – and then you forgot about it.

A cut, on your hand. Which you use for everything. Getting goo in it, dirt and crud. Petrol even, from filling the car. Dirty water, clean water, hair gel, raw food. See how your force-field protects you?

And it’s stronger, more effective for all the dirt you used to eat as a kid. All the bacteria types it learnt about and sussed how to handle. The body’s bio-database, keeping you healthy.

The 2% bad guys

Second, not all germs are bad. Only around 2% contain harmful pathogens that can actually do you damage. The rest are either benign, just coasting until they find the REAL host they’re looking for, or even actively beneficial.

It’s not just pro-biotic yoghurt that’s good for you. Down in your gut there’s around 4,000 other bacteria types necessary for digestion. The body did a deal with them millennia ago – now they live inside you in perfect synergy – you scratch my back, and I’ll scratch yours.

Thing is though, 2% of billions and billions is still a lot.

Which means you’re still at hazard if you don’t take care.

Snatch hold of a grab-handle in the Underground and you’re probably OK, even though it’s a high-touch object and certainly has germs on it. Just not the bad guys, most of the time.

Grab hold of a bed-rail visiting somebody in hospital though, and it’s another story. It’s a high-touch object too, but in hospital people are ill. A large number of ill people all in one place. So all that hand-washing they bang on about is to protect you as much as them.

And just because you’re safe most of the time doesn’t mean you should take chances.

Wash, wash, wash

Washing your hands after using the loo is like super-important. It’s impossible to avoid getting yuck on them, especially if you do a No 2.

But you’ve got to wash properly, not waggle your fingers under the tap. Use soap and work it around and through your fingers. Keep at it while you run all of “Happy Birthday” through your head. 90% of us never do this – and then wonder why we come down with norovirus or salmonella or e. coli or whatever.

Use a paper towel to dry off with too. Not a cloth one, even at home. Germs cling onto that big time.

And not one of those air dryers either – you know, the hot-blow squeegees? Just look around, on the walls and floor where they’ve got these things. Drops of water, right? Faecal-contaminated water from somebody’s bum.

So keep your hands to yourself and get out of Dodge, ASAP. You’re in a bad location where the 2% boys hang out – which is why public toilets have the bad rep that they do. They might look spic and span, but all that moisture – germs love it, floating around in the air.

And bad germs from our hands probably cause more illnesses than any other sources put together. We touch ourselves and each other – particularly our faces – and the 2% boys climb in through the soft mucous membranes of our eyes, nose and mouth.

Next thing you know, heave-ho, up-chuck, beebaa siren – and they’re rushing you into an over-crowded A&E.

A Little Bit of Soap

Yup, suddenly you’re another statistic for the punch-drunk NHS – continually reeling from admissions like yours – that could all have been prevented by a Little Bit of Soap, like the Jarmels sang in 1961.

If 95% of us don’t wash our hands properly, how many hospital cases could we prevent if we did? (Tweet this)

Which is why, wherever germs threaten, more and more places are starting to use a Hypersteriliser.

No, it won’t clean your hands – nor will it knock out the billions of good germs already inside your body.

But it will take out ALL germs – including the 2% boys – in any room that’s treated with its super-fine germ-killing hydrogen peroxide plasma mist.

No getting sick, no over-crowded hospital – even though you’re still covered in germs.

Have a nice day!

Originally posted 2015-05-11 12:21:21.

Let’s wash our hands of all our troubles

Uncle Fred in hospital bed
It’s a miracle – clean hands and Uncle Fred is well again

Shocked at the figures?

No, no, not for the election.

The ones from NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) – which shockingly reveal that 1 in 16 people being treated by the NHS picks up an HAI (Hospital Acquired Infection).

Not just dirt, germs

You’re right, that means a landslide vote for better hygiene – specifically better hand washing.

Because while doctors and nurses know hand hygiene is a must, looks like the rest of us don’t have a clue.

Only a quarter of us wash our hands more than three times a day – and more than half of us never wash our hands after going to the toilet.

We just waggle our fingers under the tap and reckon that’s good enough. The great British fudge.

Put a filthy habit like that together with going to visit Uncle Fred in hospital – and no wonder the poor bloke winds up with MRSA (methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus) – a serious nasty that can’t be treated by antibiotics.

Oops.

People get ill

We don’t think of ourselves as filthy people. But more and more the evidence is there that just by washing our hands properly, we could make most of our sicknesses and ailments go away. (Tweet this)

Like 95% of them.

Imagine.

95% of our troubles taken off the NHS – we’d have empty beds all over the place and medical staff actually getting a regular good night’s sleep.

The equivalent of a whole new NHS alongside the one we already have.

That’s, wait for it – an investment worth another £100 billion.

£100 BILLION!

More than £1,500 for every man, woman and child in the country.

Better than the lottery

Just from washing our hands.

One heck of a prize for something so simple.

Fun too, if you treat it like those fantastic folks at Northampton General Hospital.

If that’s where Uncle Fred was admitted, looks like he’s in good hands.

Like we said yesterday, pass the soap.

Originally posted 2015-05-08 13:15:53.

Take a bow, NHS – your dedication is showing

Happy doctor
How wonderful to feel wanted
and treated like a human being

Apologies for the last few blog-less days.

An elderly relative needed an urgent hospital check-up – a blood clot and infection scare.

Negative, as it turned out – though a bit nerve-wracking as it happened.

Not that it was allowed to be a drama.

Special people

Without exception, hospital staff from reception to department administrators to nurses to doctors were all reassuring, calm and professional – nothing too much trouble – dignity and respect super-plus.

Doubly important when you’re over ninety and a bit unsure of this world whizzing round you.

Yes, there were waits. Long ones watching the clock while blood tests were processed and ultrasound time was found.

But things happened, somehow the busy schedule was opened up to accommodate this little old lady – all on top of the usual hectic pace that is the hospital norm.

The extra mile – every day

Yes, take a bow – everything about this experience was exemplary.

Nobody wants to be in hospital and it was two days out of everyday life. Tiring, drawn out – but inspiring in the company of staff amazingly adept at putting smiles on our faces.

In reassuring surroundings too.

Spend a few hours in a waiting room chair and you notice things like clean floors and dust-free furniture. Same thing with the inevitable loo-breaks. Clean, properly up kept, with every sanitising precaution visibly upheld.

All stuff that is really difficult in a super-busy place with several hundred people all doing different things to the best of their professional ability – dedicated, committed and involved like you’ll never find in a supermarket or clothing store.

Horrible people get treated nice too

Sure, there were people all around who moaned and complained.

One look at their faces though, it was obvious they will always whinge about something.

How have we become so awful that we have to bellyache all the time – especially with so many people trying to help us?

A lot of people seem to bad mouth the NHS – and maybe they have reason. But two full days going through the system without anyone putting a foot wrong seemed to be the norm in this hospital – not at all an exception.

So, a message to the moaners on behalf of NHS staff who are far too polite to say:

“Shut up, you lot! Let us get on with our jobs.”

Thank you folks, you were wonderful.

Maybe we can do the same for you some day.

Originally posted 2015-05-01 12:16:40.

Why do we deprive the NHS of kindness?

Kind nurse
Kindness is personal – you feel it by example and teach it to yourself

The stories don’t go away.

Accusing headlines still roll – long after the Mid Staffs disaster.

Sloppy hygiene, indifferent  care,  patients maltreated and sidelined.

Will nothing save the NHS from self-destruction?

Once more with feeling

It’s from reports like these that the Compassion in Practice programme was begun – a nation-wide initiative led by Jane Cummings, Chief Nursing Officer for England.

Compassion is so sadly lacking that a special drive is necessary to put it in place. To recognise that patients are human beings, not numbers. That feelings and sensitivities are involved.

All very laudable – but in reality, just another top-down knee-jerk from the rah-rah top dogs. To make it look like some moral responsibility is happening.

Yes, it’s an important project and the people involved in it are obviously committed to the hilt. It’s also doomed to token responses and indifference across the board.

Lip service

Why?

Because though its focus is compassion, in the misguided real world we’ve created for ourselves, our culture no longer includes kindness.

We have become mean, selfish and bad-tempered in ways that would shock our parents. The product of our go-faster, results-driven, material-grabbing society.

And strong though it is, the Compassion in Practice programme is no match for our ingrained reflex of only looking out for Number One.

Its very credo demonstrates the background from which it has sprung: Care, Compassion, Competence, Communication, Courage and Commitment.

Take out “Compassion” and it could be any double-speak marketing plan from selling life insurance to toothpaste. Our sales teams care, we bring you the best through Competence, Communication, Courage and Commitment.

You’ve been a customer. You’ve heard it before.

Poppycock!

All those invisible words strung together to be saluted while the company hymn is sung. Meaningless promises of nothing from their overuse. Right over the heads of patients and medical staff alike.

A real issue

Which is a crying shame because it IS important. Compassion, that is.

People ARE lying in hospital and suffering unnecessarily.

Ignored, unattended and forgotten because that is the way we treat everything in our online, mobile-obsessed, narcissistic society.

Yes, Compassion. But where is the kindness?

Taken away because all of us are stampeded for time.

Gotta get results. Gotta go, go, go.

Come on, let’s move – we’ve got targets here.

Targets!

The most deadly concept ever applied to the NHS. (Tweet this)

Again because people are people, not numbers. And people need time to be treated right. As far away from targets as you could possibly get.

Give of yourself

Because kindness is time.

And sorry, that means none of the “time is money” principles of modern cut-throat business apply here.

Time is giving of yourself and we’re too damn full of ourselves to allow it. It’s the prevailing culture and we’re all immersed in it all the time.

Of course, doctors and nurses try to step out of it – and a lot of them succeed.

Only to get chucked straight back into it, coming off duty. Back to the rat-race – traffic jams, bus queues, grab-while-you-can supermarket offers and first-come-first-served push-shove living.

All of which is the world’s worst experience when you’re ill.

When you’re not yourself and things won’t work properly – scared and unsure you will ever survive.

And all around you is the driving myth that there aren’t enough hours in the day.

That everything must be short, bite-sized and razor-sharp to get through what is needed.

The minimum of care, concern, courtesy, considerateness, cognizance of others and consciousness of their needs.

Impossible to sign up to without time.

Not us any more

Because kindness requires reflexes we no longer have. Listening, paying attention, thinking of others, responding to them with respect and dignity.

You can’t learn these in a weekend workshop. Or wave around a certificate claiming you’ve got them.

They’re life skills we learn the hard way from birth, vital capabilities that get used every day. Or should.

Disciplines that make us better than we are.

That lift us up from being also-rans in the rat-race – into feeling, caring human beings who really do give a damn about the world around us and the people in it.

Kindness in the NHS?

Back to being human

It’s there all right. And it’s up to us to encourage it by our own example. To give Jane Cummings and her team the co-operation, support and teeth that they need.

To prove that Compassion in Practice really does inspire Care, Compassion, Competence, Communication, Courage and Commitment.

To get away from those staff abuse posters that are a daily indictment of the lives we lead.

To get away from the mindset none of us believe anyway. Your call IS important, we care about our customers. Currently, you are Number 17 in a queue.

To be polite and thoughtful even though waiting times are long. To co-operate at every turn to make staff’s work easier. To act with kindness ourselves and inspire it in return.

Because what goes around, comes around.

And it’s not necessarily the NHS that’s to blame.

It’s us.

Originally posted 2015-04-14 14:40:14.

Ebola won’t kill us, let’s rather do that ourselves

Infection fear
It’s ourselves we should worry about, we’re more dangerous than any germ

Here’s a harsh reality check for you.

If you die of Ebola, it’ll be your own doing.

You know it’s a deadly disease, you put yourself in the line of fire. The consequences are entirely yours.

Deliberate suicide

So what do they call that, self-inflicted death?

Suicide, right? You’ve committed suicide.

And it wasn’t Ebola that did it, it was you. By your own volition.

Ebola just does, what Ebola does. And exposing yourself to it goes one way. You knew that, before you started, but you did it anyway.

Makes you think about those volunteers who are out there fighting the disease, right? Médecins Sans Frontières , our own NHS people, British armed forces – and the selfless folk from a whole stack of other countries, doing their humanitarian best.

Heroes every one of them. Because they risk suicide to do what they do.

They know they could die. But they do what they do for the sake of others.

How careless can we be?

Not like the rest of us.

Every day we take stupid chances. We know they’re stupid, yet we take them anyway.

We’re not actually thinking suicide at the time, we’re just being lazy.

But those are the stakes, we’re playing with our lives. And we do it through sloppy hygiene.

Want an example? Look no further than a handshake. Not the how of it, the contempt of it.

“New research has revealed that just 38 per cent of men and 60 per cent of women wash their hands after visiting the lavatory.”

Disgusting, yes. But more than that, seriously stupid.

Because every single one of us knows the importance of washing hands after going to the loo. We know what happens if we don’t – that we could make ourselves seriously ill. We know it could put us in hospital.

We even know we could die from it.

Yet we carry on anyway, not thinking for a second that we just risked suicide.

Exactly the same as painting a target on your chest and walking onto a shooting range. Seriously, utterly stupid.

Unnecessary risk

Because you don’t see the Ebola mercy-workers taking chances like that – and they KNOW the chance they’re taking.

They’re ready with the meticulous scrub-up, the personal protective equipment donned under the watchful eye of a trained clinical observer: scrubs, overalls, apron, boots, double gloves, medical mask, respirator, goggles, surgical cap.

Then the UV tunnel, the chemical checks, everything. A whole careful code to be followed in scrupulous detail.

And still they can be unlucky. One unguarded moment, one second of diverted attention – and a needle-stick changes their lives.

Yet how many of us stare at the mirror in the loo – check the hair, the face, the way our clothes sit – and walk out without touching a tap?

A deliberate needle-stick moment, right there.

It was you!

Yes, deliberate.

Pleading forgetful is just making excuses. We’re just too lazy and we know it.

So how many of us actually do walk out of the loo – to come down with some medical nasty? Norovirus, diphtheria, MRSA, take your pick.

We don’t go looking for Ebola. But we sure as hell got what we deserve. (Tweet this)

Or worse, pass it on to somebody else by shaking hands, handing out coffee and biscuits, or simply handling the office phone.

Sloppy hygiene. Ugh.

So why aren’t more of us dead?

Originally posted 2015-03-06 11:28:50.

Atishoo, atishoo, is the NHS falling down?

Girl serving hamburger
Even McDonalds can’t serve you as fast as this

It’s happening all over again.

Another scandal. Whistleblowers. People dying in thousands. Claims of negligence, malpractice and mismanagement.

Are we all more at risk than we know?

Unlikely.

Sheer scale

Because the NHS is no ordinary organisation.

Behind its doors, 1.3 million professionals handle over 1 million patients every 36 hours. (Tweet this)

On that kind of scale, problems and hiccups are inevitable.

Just think of the pressure. The clock is ticking, people need attention. Staff take short cuts, managers go for easy options, safety procedures get overlooked.

So now there’s another hoo-hah about failures, and patients “too scared” to complain.

Regrettable, yes. Unforgivable, certainly. In some cases, possibly criminal.

Except that for an organisation the size of the NHS, complaints are inevitable and actually essential.

Reality check

Take everybody’s pet wail and squawk  – A&E.

In just one year, it handles 22 million patients and up – most of them inside the official 4 hour waiting period.

That’s more than 2,500 an hour – or around 40 a minute – 365 days a year, 24/7.

How many fast food outlets can equal that?

Try ordering a double burger and chips at McDonalds and expecting them in 60 seconds – at the same time as 40 other seriously hungry dudes are yelling for theirs.

And McDonalds get complaints too. Every big organisation does.

They actually need them.

Complaints are necessary

And as a customer, it’s kinda like your duty to complain.

Because at that kind of turnover, how else can anyone know that something is wrong?

Everything is happening too fast for even eagle-eyed perfectionists to notice, so it’s up to each of us to press the buzzer when things glitch.

So if there’s moaning and yelling going on about the NHS, be thankful.

Something is getting attention and something will be done about it.

Sure, it’s scary that it involves doctors and hospitals and people’s lives.

At least it’s out in the open and not hushed up any more.

And how many big manufacturers have not tried to get away with that?

Nowadays even BMW and Toyota are not afraid to issue a total recall.

If there is a problem, it needs to be fixed.

Being open and honest about it restores confidence.

And not everything in the NHS is a train-smash like Mid Staffs.

Confidence

Going in to hospital for an op?

In 2014, compared to Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland and USA, the NHS was rated as best by the Commonwealth Fund for efficiency, effective care, safe care, coordinated care, patient-centred care and cost-related problems.

Looks like you’re safe enough.

But make sure you shout like hell if you’re not.

You owe it to yourself.

Originally posted 2015-02-11 13:33:30.

Lonely and scared? Never with ambulance crews

Woman crying
Relax, it’s going to be alright –
the ambulance crew are here

When did our world become so cruel?

People don’t care. They’re rude and greedy. Shove you aside to grab for themselves.

A shocking example, set from Westminster on down. You can’t blame the yobs when the toffs are doing it too.

Nobody wants to know any more. Love is dead.

Until you call an ambulance

You might have to wait a while though, these NHS ambulance guys are busy.

So busy, those parliamentary do-gooders are falling over themselves to complain about how long it takes.

They’ve never had to queue, nine deep, to deliver an code-blue emergency to an over-worked A&E. Never faced grid-locked traffic, or Lord Muck in the Roller, refusing to move over for lights and siren.

Or been so hard-pressed and over-stretched that London Ambulance have had to fly in a relief squad of 175 paramedics from Oz.

Yeah, they’ll get to you – in maybe more than the 4 hours officially designated. A wild thumbsuck target set by Westminster wonks who never drive themselves.

But what can you expect when traffic in Central London is only 8.98 mph?

They never learn, do they? That’s the same speed as a horse-drawn carriage in 1830.

Dedication and respect

But at least the ambulance people get to you!

And that’s when you find out – they’re the only people in the whole world who care.

Who treat you with respect and consideration.

There you are, terrified, with a rib sticking through your chest.

Who else in the world is so calm, so soothing, so skilled that every movement puts you at your ease? (Tweet this)

You know you’re in good hands.

Even the Aussie blokes say so – top paramedics, selected from Sydney’s best.

Because London is the busiest ambulance service in the world and that’s why they want to work here. 5,000 calls a day is a challenge they can’t resist – remember Crocodile Dundee?

It’s OK

They’re here to help you. To reassure, to care, to get you towards feeling better.

They’re dedicated and professional too.

But who teaches them that wonderful compassion and the skill to restore confidence, only a few short years out of school? The Aussies, the Kiwis, the Poles – or our own home-grown heroes, right here in the Old Country?

Nobody else in the world can care for you better.

Not even your GP, who’s swamped with patients now out-of-hours work is stopped.

And it’s a terrifying world when you don’t know what’s happened to you.

Especially at 2.00 in the morning, when NHS paramedics are the only people on the planet who are concerned that you’re having a panic attack.

They don’t call it love, but that’s what it is.

Compassion and care for fellow human beings, totally selfless and unreserved.

So the NHS is the biggest waste of money in the UK is it?

Political rethink

Try remembering that when you’ve fallen down the stairs and you think you’re going to die.

The only people who are going to help you are wearing NHS badges – and they’re in the middle of a 12-hour shift.

You slag them off, but they still love you.

Even enough to save you from yourself.

Originally posted 2015-01-27 11:55:56.

NHS strike: who can blame them?

Aggro woman
You’d strike too, if people wasted your time the same way

Shock, horror. Whatever will we do?

No gumming up A&E with split fingernails. No ambulance to pick up the shopping from Tesco.

It’s a disgrace, that’s what it is.

You betcha.

The real price tag

Over-worked health professionals doing 12 hour shifts for small change, while the fat-cat administrators pull down enough to fund a small country.

You’d strike too, under those circumstances.

For a lot more than the 1% these folk are asking.

Day and night they’re on the job, every day of the year. With rank-and-file workers often on less than £1,800 a month.

So how long would you last on that, at the pace they have to work at?

Pie in the sky

Meanwhile, in those swish Band 9 offices with the reserved parking bay outside, £1,800 might be closer to the take-home for a week.

And these aren’t necessarily doctors, mind. Not even technical experts.

Amazing where you can get with the right politics, isn’t it? And the right network.

Plugged in all the way to Westminster. Where salaries and expenses and budgets don’t mean a lot anyway.

Unless you’re the unfortunate one in the hot seat who’s unavoidably responsible.

So the actual workers are jumping up and down for a 1% increase. Less than 50p a day. Not even parking money to the fat cats. Not even enough for their newspaper.

Peanuts at the price

Trim their salaries to make up the deficit and they wouldn’t even feel it. Half a day’s less sun-lounger on the beach at Ibiza.

Yet they and all the other heavies are complaining the strike will put lives at risk.

Except – reality check – lives are at risk already, if you’re an actual worker.

You try coming out on £1,800 a month – rent, utilities and groceries – with still enough to pay for your Oyster card to get to work. What do you mean, car? Is this some kind of joke?

Which is exactly what arguing the toss on this strike is.

Sure it pushes up costs, which the NHS cannot afford.

Unless it’s clawed back from the fat cats who none of us asked for or needed in the first place.

Let any one of them come into A&E and complain about the service.

Or sound off that the NHS is a waste of money, like that uber-large political dinosaur on TV last week.

What price, duty of care?

50p to fix your fingernail? Try doing that down the High Street.

Or does sir need special attention from falling out of a taxi after an evening of special networking? Slightly concussed are we? Bit of a broken leg?

Yes, it’s a waste of money fixing it up – but they’ll do it anyway. On the house, like they always do.

OK, so it’s 1% and we’ll all wind up paying for it somehow.

But who cares, if you’re really in trouble and could just die?

You won’t find more dedicated experts anywhere. (Tweet this)

Or better attention for your fingernails.

Originally posted 2015-01-26 13:08:15.

NHS fat-cats make us all sick as dogs

Fist of Money
No wonder you’re not well,
this disease is contagious

In the euphoria of the festive season, you might have missed it.

A telling report that the number of NHS managers earning more than £300,000 a year has doubled, with some pulling down a whopping £620,000.

Obscene amounts of money

Frankly, the idea that ANYONE earns more than a tenth of that is pretty disgusting. And yes, that includes the Prime Minister at £142,500.

Because none of these are your rank-and-file NHS do-ers. They’re not doctors or specialists either, not one of them is involved in the actual practice of making people well.

These are top-level “executives” brought in on the advice of “consultants” – and paid an outlandish fortune for “high calibre” expertise at short notice.

Unhealthy business practice

And “consultant” of course does not mean an expert in the medical sense – but a management consultant, whose only connection to anything vaguely medical might be a thing called a balance “sheet”.

Sad cases, these guys. Even on mega-buck salaries they can’t manage their own lives, often demanding even more.

Put that against nurses and midwives, who have yet to receive the 1% pay rise they were hoping for in 2014.

Yup, you got it. It’s the non-medical side of the NHS that’s soaking up all the money.

So don’t go bad-mouthing A&E departments because they can’t get through the deluge of winter patients needing attention. Go chuck rocks at the managers who failed to provide facilities and resources for them to do their job properly.

Do they doctor the books too?

Gross mismanagement? You better believe it.

This item from The Telegraph is just the tip of the iceberg: ‘Medway Foundation Trust, recently named as having one of the worst A&Es in the country according to patient surveys, paid Nigel Beverley rates of £1,740 a day until he left just before an inspection found A&E in a “state of crisis”‘.

Unfortunate isn’t it, that GBH is against the law?

Except such monsters have no place in hospitals, or anywhere near one.

The only rightful place for them is buried under the sewage of their own making.

Originally posted 2015-01-05 11:25:23.