Tag Archives: motivation

Penny-pinching bosses incur massive losses with hard-line back-to-work rules

Businessman facing loss
Invisible money-drain: penny-pinching on staff health protection can cost a fortune

That old advice, penny wise, pound foolish, never felt truer.

Sick or not, most managers aren’t happy unless all workers are full-time at their desks, getting on with the job.

Most staff know this. So despite being sick, do their damnedest to get back to work ASAP. There might not be a job if they don’t.

Which means staying at home two days instead of three. Getting back to work only half-recovered. And stressing about under-performance once they’re back.

The downside of penny-pinching

Hold that thought – under-performance.

About what happens when ANYONE is unwell at work.

Impaired competence. Not up to the mark. Not really doing their job properly.

Unsurprising really. How well CAN you perform when your guts are on fire, your head pounds like a pile-driver  and your thoughts are all over the place?

Uh huh.

And the boss is happy to pay for this deficiency?

That jobs take longer, important issues get missed and key clients feel neglected?

Has the price tag ever been calculated?

OK, according to CIPD figures, the average employee costs £522 per year in sick leave.  Six days out of circulation at around £87 a day.  Or as business experts PwC calculate it, an all-up cost to the country of £29 billion a year.

Not chicken-feed, so the average boss tries everything to avoid it.

Usually with stick, not carrot. Psychological mind games and bullying. The emotional blackmail of letting colleagues down.  Real or imagined threats to job security.

Yeah right, a saving of £87 per person, per day.

£174 if pressured into coming back two days early instead of one. Big deal.

False economy

Meanwhile, as businesses are beginning to find, being unwell at work costs 10 times more than being booked off sick.

Save £87 – and lose £870. Penny-pinching gone mad.

And that’s just for starters.

Coming back early, those staffers could be contagious. Bringing back germs to infect others. A domino effect going round the office. More sick days, more expense – and more under-performance for everyone coming back early.

Make that under-performance, de luxe.

Because how motivated is anyone pressured into being at work when it’s a challenge just to be there? How committed? How prepared to go the extra mile?

Which is where the price tag gets scary – applied “germonomics”.

Over and above the cost of being booked off sick – how does it work, being unwell at your desk?

What’s the cost of opportunities not followed up? Orders mislaid or lost? Delay penalties on late finishing work? Cost overruns from lack of supervision? Loss of goodwill? Or the cost of extra time and temp staff hired to meet deadlines?

Kinda makes nonsense out of strong-arming staff back to work, doesn’t it?

Or paying them an incentive to do so. Good money after bad.

And how about the fact that a lot of the time, it’s not being unwell that’s the issue? How about that most of us FREQUENTLY feel off colour and not completely ourselves? That somehow we feel pain or physical discomfort around every three days?

Invisible costs

No wonder that under-performance is as expensive as it is.

Expensive and invisible. Often as much as a whole year’s salary per staff member eaten up in unnecessary overheads – a double salary bill.

Mistakenly accepted as things taking longer than expected, unforeseen setbacks and problems with productivity. All hazily explained away as a “cost of doing business”.

Yet how many bosses ever do anything to prevent it?

Not with bribes or misplaced back-to-work incentives, but a real investment in protecting staff health?

Because it can be done. Actively protecting staff health so they don’t get ill in the first place. At least, not in their working area.

All it takes is regular treatment to eradicate germs. Make the place sterile once a week, or even daily. No germs, people can’t get sick. All that money rescued.

Adding it to normal cleaning procedures will do it. A few hundred quid extra to mist the place up with ionised hydrogen peroxide – to oxidise all viruses and bacteria and be totally germ-free.

Not penny-pinching, but pound-grabbing.

Visible dividends

And a lot extra besides.

How much better will staff feel, knowing that THEIR interests are at heart, that THEIR health is deliberately protected?

How about commitment now? Staff loyalty? Capability and performance? Going the extra mile? Productivity and efficiency? Or the company bank balance?

The costs might be invisible, but the dividends aren’t.

A lot better than penny-pinching, surely.

Picture Copyright: andreypopov / 123RF Stock Photo

How good are workplace wellness programmes if they DON’T get rid of germs?

Gym hunk unwell
Keeping fit gives you the bod – getting rid of germs saves your life

Pump up the feel-good. Gotta stay healthy, gotta keep fit. All very nice and motivational – but how come nobody talks about getting rid of germs?

OK, a major chunk of health problems at work are about stress. Staff suffer all kinds of insecurities -and having a few endorphins kick in after exercise can only be good.

Except how many of these get physical / gym activities are really treating symptoms, not cause?

Because for all the thousands of staff facing stress issues, how many are caused by the reality of a bad manager?

Bad managers are to blame for the UK’s current productivity crisis, according to the Bank of England. Wanting in business abilities – and even more often, lacking in people skills.

Bad boss syndrome

Poor people skills, particularly by bosses, are the bedrock of job stress.

Start with an inability to communicate – add glory-seeking, inconsistent decision-making, side-stepping, favouritism and helicopter supervision – it’s no wonder even senior staff become paranoid.

But find a manager who knows how to motivate and inspire – and watch the psychological problems just melt away.

Better add attentiveness as well. Observant of staff needs and sensitive to them, sometimes before they’re even aware of them themselves.

For instance – staff disposition. Tired, lethargic, run-down and prone to headaches?

That’s as much environment as physical wellbeing. Poor lighting, stale air and uncomfortable furniture are all fixable issues that present as feeling unwell. So is the grey area of sick building syndrome – it feels unhealthy, and therefore it is.

So that flogging just the feel-good aspect of workplace wellness is compensatory side-stepping. Staff participation is rewarded by keep-fit activities and exercise, while the whole responsibility of protecting their health is brushed under the carpet.

Protection – it’s the law

It is a manager’s responsibility for example, to protect staff from exposure to legionnaire’s disease or legionella – a bacterial killer that lurks in water systems and air conditioning.

By law, this is an illness any manager must take the right precautions and control risks against.  Failure to do so can trigger million-pound fines or even a custodial sentence.

Which puts the focus squarely on what ANY wellness programme should – the safety and health of staff. Anything else is just window dressing.

Of course, legionnaire’s disease is just one affliction of billions we’re all threatened with. Viruses, bacteria, fungi – and the whole business of getting rid of germs.

And workplaces are more at risk from them simply because of the number of people grouped together in an enclosed space. Sharing the same air, taking up the same space, interacting with each other and touching the same objects – all germ delivery methods.

Unwell at work

Make no error, nothing knocks the feel-good worse than experiencing illness.

It doesn’t have to be big either – a headache or tummy cramp is enough to put people off their stroke. And most of us suffer ailments like that once every three days. 57.5 days a year, almost three working months.

Which flags up a major productivity hiccup right there. People unwell at work, because they don’t think it’s serious enough to stay home. But the feeling off-colour is real, so how well do they perform?

More to the point, how motivated are they? How reliable are their actions? No wonder being unwell at work costs 10 times more than straight absenteeism. Plus all the other costs – of mistakes, impaired judgement and lack of attention.

Yes, so?

Get rid of the germs. Make all the health problems go away. See staff revitalise because they feel healthy. Watch productivity accelerate – from the right kind of feel-good.

Overweight and smokers

Including among the fatties and smokers, who most wellness programmes try to penalise. Kind of a mistake isn’t it? Don’t ALL young achievers over-indulge early in their careers? Eat too much, smoke too much, drink too much, party too much – doesn’t that describe just about every hot-shot performer in the City?

Protecting them from themselves they won’t thank us for. But protecting them from germs in the workplace is a doddle. Keeping them safe from all the usual bugs that interrupt getting on with the job.

And all the dangerous ones that could kill them, given the chance. Including the law-decreed murderer you’re supposed to shield them against – legionella.

The easy way out

So, get rid of germs.

All it takes is a small addition to your regular cleaning schedule. Wipe-down, vacuum, empty the waste – AND a mist up with hydrogen peroxide.

Just forty minutes and the place is sterile – ALL germs are destroyed. No viruses, no bacteria, no fungi, no nothing. With immediately achievable results.

A lot less expensive – and better contributor to productivity – than the 10 grand one company spent on gym membership.

Good business sense really.

Motivate staff with wellness programmes if you like – and can live with the expense.

But get rid of germs – and they’ll feel well all by themselves.

Picture Copyright: gladkov / 123RF Stock Photo