Kitchen hide and seek – looks clean, but is it safe?

Germs in kitchen
War against germs – there is a way to win

OK, time out.

Pretend you’re a germ in a professional kitchen – one of those high-performance, quick-acting norovirus types – a food poisoning nightmare – where would you hide?

There’s no time limit, you start airborne, coming in on some posh lady’s red Christian Dior coat. Through-draft from the HVAC system wafts you across the dining room and the rubber seal on the kitchen door sucks you in. The kitchen, whoo-hoo!

It’s moist in here and warm, all those pots boiling and bubbling. You’re airborne, somewhere near the hood over the stove area. There’s prep stations on both sides, two big bain maries, and a massive deep tray of cooked vegetables. Take your choice.

A word of warning. Most places, they’ll come at you with professional cleaning liquids – spray surfactants that also disinfect. They’ll go at work tops and counters every few minutes – and the floor gets done four times a day. Tricky.

Or not. Clever thinking puts you on the underside of a prep station – basically a metal table top against one of the walls. It has a quick wipe-down surface and shows dirt instantly. But you’re right, nobody thinks about the underside – and sometimes they even put black rubbish bags down there.

Under the sink’s good too. You might like the moisture. They’re always washing in this place and ripples of water slop over all the time. Yes, it’s often got detergent but that never deterred you did it? Ha, ha. Moisture makes you grow!

Oh, you’ve gone for somewhere else – the ceiling! Good thinking, they’ll never get you there. Everything all gets wiped down and disinfected, but only the work surfaces. Nobody thinks of the air itself – that’s 80% of the room space – or those places normally out of reach.

But when you’re only 2 microns across, you can ride the air currents to wherever you like. The updraft from that pot of boiling courgettes should do fine. And you’re right in the middle, above all the action. Perfect.

Safe to breed and multiply. Ready for your future generations to drop down and ride to wherever. One of those house specials, for instance. Into the middle of that “terrine of foie gras and suffolk chicken, damson, celeriac hazelnut and toasted brioche”. Ever so posh.

That full-of-himself bloke in the Brunello Cucinelli wool suit, rabbiting on with “Anything but Chardonnay” is going to love you. The up-chucks and the runs. All that sitting on the loo. How many days will you give it? Five? Like your thinking. That’ll teach him to shoot his mouth off.

But oh, oh. There’s a problem. They’ve shut the kitchen down for the night and just rolled in this thing like an electronic wheelie bin. Some kind of sprayer, from the looks of it. Let them try. Up here on the ceiling you should be jake. Just keep doing what you’re doing.

Except it isn’t going to work is it? That spray-mist it’s putting out is ultra-fine, tiny molecules smaller than droplets of water. See look, it’s ionised, actually reaching out and grabbing hold of your buddies down there. What a way to go, ripped apart by oxygen atoms – these people are monsters.

And whoops! That stuff is rising too, spreading everywhere. It’s reached in under that prep station – thank goodness you didn’t hang out there. Up, up, nobody told you about mist rising, swirling across the ceiling. Better face facts, pal – you’re going to get yours.

Because it’s hydrogen peroxide is why – and no bacteria or virus comes back from exposure to that. And just to be brutal, it’s boosted with colloidal silver. You and your whole dynasty are gone, finished, kaput.

Sure, it’s a horrible death – but you know what? We never liked you anyway.

Good riddance to bad rubbish.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

There’s restaurants and restaurants – why’s this one so heavenly?

Stairway to heaven
No germs or bacteria, no collywobbles or funny tummy

It’s a classy place with a famous chef.

Prime location, soft lighting, designer place settings.

And why not? You’ve earned this.

A night out to please every indulgence.

An impressive menu too.

AIR CONDITIONED, it says at the bottom. Well, of course.

STERILISED DAILY.

Sterilised?

You call the maître d’.

Sterilised – has there been a health problem?

You’ve read about these celebrity places.

Surprise inspection – rats in the kitchen, worms in the salad, everybody down with norovirus.

Surprise is right – a pleasant one for you. And a thing of the future, happening now.

Seems the whole restaurant is sterilised for your safety and protection.

You glance round. At the soft drapes and high ceilings. The expensive-looking chandeliers.

You’ve watched Downton Abbey, you know how tricky those things are to clean.

A confident grin from the maître d’.

They have a robot.

A nifty thing on wheels that they roll in when everyone’s gone. Close all the windows and doors and the thing mists up the place – an ultra-fine mist of hydrogen peroxide. Seems no germ can withstand it. Not even this ebola stuff that has everyone in a tizz.

Apparently this mist stuff is ionised too. So it rises up, into, and under everything. With charged particles that grab hold of bacteria and viruses – shoving oxygen atoms at them. Dead and gone, unable to touch anybody – and that means you.

And they do this every day, so you’re safe. The whole restaurant, the kitchen, the loos – even the cloakroom.

When they open the doors, you’re into a place where germs can’t touch you. Unless that bloke with the sneeze on Table Four brought something in with him. Not so likely to get to you though, if the whole place is sterilised.

So you can relax and indulge. Even you with your sensitive tummy. Dare to be different and get away with it.

Like the trout almondine. If you’ll pardon the expression, it’s to die for. Meaning of course that it’s heavenly.

Good choice.

And as you knew when you sat down, you deserve it.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 27 June 2018 @ 5:28 am

Originally posted on 27 June 2018 @ 5:28 am

Want to live to be 100? Get healthy, stay healthy, easy-peasy

Senior lady with nurse
Watch out for the germs and you could live to 120

Sounds weird, but it’s true.

The best investment you can make in your personal good health is to scrub your fingernails.

Germs, you see – and yes, you’ve heard it all before.

Nag, nag, wash your hands.

BECAUSE IF YOU DON’T, YOU’LL DIE!

No seriously, just think about it for twenty seconds.

Right now, a whole string of medicines that doctors usually give us when we’re sick aren’t working any more. Or to be more accurate, those killer viruses and bacteria have developed an immunity to them.

It hasn’t happened yet, but the whole medical profession is getting ready for it. Within the next 10 years, germs from a paper cut could be the end of you.

And that’s you now, the very picture of health – in the gym every day, running 2K at weekends, lots of greens in your diet, and watching your drinking.

But it’s a bit more difficult on the other side of 35. Or 50, or 70. When the body slows down it’s more susceptible to risk. And with all those germs out there going superbug, that risk is getting worse.

Because even BEFORE you get ill you’re surrounded by billions of germs everyday. They’re in the air all around you. And when your lungs weaken because of the smoking, or your heart strains more because of the extra 10Ks body weight, those germs are going to nail you in preference to anybody younger.

Unless you nail them first.

Which is a whole new hygiene level we’ve got to get used to in the future.

Scrub your nails?

Not good enough. If you want to be safe, you’ve got to scrub the world around you. Everything you touch, even the very air you breathe. Because that’s where the germs are, waiting to get you.

But don’t worry. More and more places are becoming safer because they’re sterilised – pathogen no-go zones, toally free from germs – hotel rooms, doctor’s surgeries, school canteens, luxury coach rides to Germany.

Inside each of them, a super-fine mist of hydrogen peroxide oxidises all germs and bacteria to nothing. No germs, no infection, absolutely sterile.

Which is kind of reassuring when you’re getting on a bit. Once you’re over 80, it’s all that much more likely SOMETHING will upset the apple-cart. So it’s nice not to know it won’t be germs.

Time to nag those youngsters into looking after themselves a bit more than they do.

No germs, healthy living, they can live for ever – which is what their soul is telling them they can do anyway. And why not? They’re entitled to live to a ripe old age as much as you are.

They just don’t know it yet.

No more stowaways – viruses and germs miss the boat

Container ship
Sterilised before departure – another shipload of germs that aren’t coming

You’ll notice it most at the supermarket.

Bananas from Chile, lamb from New Zealand, oranges from Spain, grapes from South Africa – an amazing amount of stuff from overseas.

All shipped in by container, those big 20-foot jobbies you see thundering down the M25. Every day, thousands and thousands of them – stuff to keep us going.

Unwanted passengers too.

Every once in a while there’s a lizard or a tarantula in someone’s shopping. Slightly hazardous to your health.

Unseen passengers too. More dangerous because there’s more of them. Billions and billions of microscopic viruses or bacteria. Often dread diseases waiting for a chance.

But not always.

Most containers get hosed out when they’re unloaded. Gunk and dirt taken out to make sure they’re clean. Good practice, but not good enough. Not these days.

Because germs just love damp places to hide and breed. Especially in warm countries, baked by the sun. In empty containers waiting for a load.

That’s if they get the chance.

More and more shippers choose to sterilise their containers before they’re loaded.

Sometimes with dry ice, sometimes with ozone, some even try super-heated steam.

Most effective is hydrogen peroxide. Sprayed in as a micro-mist finer than water, ionised so it disperses and spreads into every little crevice. In mid-air or on every surface, it finds and clings to harmful pathogens, forcing oxygen atoms at them.

No virus or bacteria can survive being oxidised. Its whole cell structure is ripped to shreds. There’s no smell or odour either – permanently gone.

And to make doubly sure, the hydrogen peroxide is boosted with of colloidal silver, renowned for its germ-killing since the Nineteenth Century. In 40 minutes, that container it totally sterile. Safe and good to go for its journey to your supermarket depot.

Nothing but air and moisture – because when hydrogen peroxide has done its work, it decomposes to oxygen and water. So if there are any unintended passengers – a ladybird on your roses from Kenya – they’re in the boxes from the grower, not anywhere else.

Kind of reassuring isn’t it?

Millions of containers travelling the world for you – and you stay protected.

So when your ship comes in, you know you’re safe.

Super hygiene stops superbugs – non-medical DIY that works

Superhero flying
Super hygiene to the rescue

Anxiety, panic attacks and feeling depressed can all be helped by your doctor. But how about when your doctor gets them?

Sure, there are capsules to be swallow and tablets to take. But that’s treating symptoms, not cause.

Because your doctor’s biggest concern right now is the increasing failure of antibiotics. Or more accurately, the emergence of the all-resistant superbug. If you’re unlucky enough to fall ill, those once reliable medicines are beginning not to work any more.

There’s no panic yet, because health professionals don’t work that way. Most of the hysteria is to sell newspapers. A lot of medicines still work, and doctors soldier on with their life-saving work, the way they have always.

But the clock is ticking. No less a heavy than Chief Medical Officer, Professor Dame Sally Davies points out that developing a new drug and making it safe takes up to twenty years.

Too long, isn’t it? Because people are falling ill now. And not just from diseases. From infections after injury or surgery. From that cut on your leg, shaving in the bath.

Now hold on a minute. Doctors are only treating people who are ill already. Quaint Chinese traditions aside, we can’t ALSO expect them to prevent us getting sick in the first place.

If you’re injured in a road accident, your doctor can patch you up. But it’s the work of local councils, the highways agency, police and the DVLA to keep the roads safe and ensure they don’t happen in the first place. And your own watchfulness, of course.

It’s the same with superbugs. The Doc piles into action if you come down with something. But it’s hygiene laws, sanitation procedures and your own life habits that help you avoid them. A non-medical solution.

Which makes it more a house-keeping issue than a medical one. More like Janitor versus Doctor.

You see, washing and scrubbing is often not enough against superbugs.

We need to up our daily hygiene measures – make them way more effective than they are at the moment.

Washing hands and antibiotics worked fine in the Twentieth Century. To survive in the Twenty-First, we have to do better.

And we can.

Most people don’t know it, but it’s possible to destroy pretty well all viruses and bacteria before they get to us. To sterilise the whole place so there is nothing there to threaten us.

Imagine doing that to schools and crèches. Or hotel rooms and restaurants. Or planes, ships, trains and buses. Or public places, libraries, gyms, theatres – anywhere where people congregate.

You walk in and the whole place is sterile, no germs, no nothing. You’re safe. Or more to the point, your kids are.

That doesn’t mean that little Johnny with a cold is not going to give it to someone. But it does mean there are no lingering pathogens from yesterday or last week. They’ve all been eliminated.

And just for perspective, it’s worth remembering that most viruses can survive for seven days or more – probably their entire life-cycle. Why is why, after a long weekend, an untreated classroom may not be as safe as you think it is.

No, you don’t go at these killers with bleach, scrubbing down counters and floors in a frenzy. Bleach won’t do the job and most microbes are up in the air anyway. 80% of any room is the air space we move around in, with the microbes floating round in their billions.

You got that right. Cleaning countertops, work surfaces and floors is only 20% of the job.

And at just 0.02 microns across – the size of a rhinovirus cell – microorganisms are so light, they’re always in suspension. Waiting to be breathed in or swallowed, or settle on cuts and abrasions – just because they’re in the same place at the same time.

Yes, doctors are worried. But we can do something now.

Most effective is a machine not much bigger than a vacuum cleaner that automatically mists the air in a room with hydrogen peroxide.

Doctors know about hydrogen peroxide – a tried and tested germ-fighter since the Nineteenth Century. The body manufactures it to kill germs internally. But not in quantities enough to kill superbugs.

The “mistifying” machine sprays ionised hydrogen peroxide – finer and lighter than water droplets, able to disperse upwards and outwards – even underneath things that seldom get cleaned.

The stuff destroys pathogens by shoving oxygen atoms at them. Their cell structure is ripped apart and they cannot survive. 45 minutes later, all that’s left is oxygen and the finest film of water.

And a sterilised room, of course – 99,9999% of germs dead, per clinical evaluation tests.

Count on it, as superbugs get smarter, you’re going to see a lot of these machines in the future. You may even have one at home, though they’re a bit on the expensive side at the moment – about the same as a commercial floor cleaning machine.

They’re going to be necessary. Because the bugs don’t just get smarter, they kill better. And it’s you and your loved ones they’re having a go at.

As an effective defence though, hydrogen peroxide works against even the deadliest killers. Keeping you safe by avoidance – more realistic than hoping you’ll get better once you’ve got something.

Think about it. A new level of daily hygiene. A non-medical precaution you can take now.

Not rocket science. Just super hygiene agaist superbugs.

The road to healthy business

Coach on Motorway
Everybody safe, sterilised from germs

Poor Mrs Bremridge.

She took ill on the way back from the matinée at the Royal Theatre. A one-man presentation of Gogol’s Diary of a Madman with James Tibbott – a bit high-brow for her companions but perfect for Molly B. She had quite a career in the West End until Russell swept her off her feet to Kenya.

Billy Young was the coach driver, standing in for Erin because he had the Transit licence and Erin only drove the Scanias – too big deal to handle a load of OAPs.

So it was up to him to do something when Mrs B had her attack.

He didn’t know what it was, but it looked bad, shivering and shaking like she was having a fit. And the moans. It was because she made so much noise that Billy stopped in the first place. Poor old dear looked like she might not make it.

So Billy took no chances. Drove straight to A&E, fighting panic all the way that the others would come down with it too. Some kind of bug, you never knew what it was – and suddenly you’re disabled in a wheelchair with half your gut removed.

Unbelievable, but having a busload of OAPs on their doorstep worked for Mrs B. The triage nurse had her put straight through for treatment without even waiting. Which was how come Billy knew what it was before they left. Malaria apparently – once you had it, attacks kept recurring.

Billy shivered. Not for him. So when he dropped the lot of them at the Civic Centre, he got the bus back to the yard and scrubbed it down with the first things he could find – washing up liquid and bleach from under the sink.

It got to him at home too. Poor Mrs Bremridge, shaking so violently. It spooked him bad and that was no lie. It set him thinking too. Maybe bleach wasn’t enough. What if he caught it, exposed to it all the time because it kept lurking in his bus?

Panic sent him to the Internet – where he found it. An aerosol bomb that misted up enclosed spaces with ammonium chloride. Killed all germs by oxidising them, it said on the label, knocked them down in mid-air. Shut the windows, put the thing in the middle of the floor, hit the button.

It sure misted up the place, a white haze that ghosted the whole of the inside. Trouble was, his Dad caught him at it – it was his company after all. Gave him an earful about filling a perfectly good bus with white smoke.

He calmed down when Billy explained though. Two pints of Best Bitter it took before the Old Man got it. Another two and he reckoned Billy was a genius.  Sterilise the vehicle was what the stuff did, made it safe from germs for everyone who stepped aboard. A business advantage, they’d be rich.

And how many times had Billy himself had to hop over to Germany or the Czech Republic because one of their other drivers had caught a bug from one of the passengers? A whole coach-load marooned in a hotel that they had to pay for, and then argue about with the insurance company.

They bought a job lot of aerosols after that. Enough for their whole fleet to carry every day they were away from home – Billy’s Dad, Len, Erin, Billy himself and Fagin – thirty-five bombs a week minimum.

Their accountant complained of course, but it was worth every penny being able to guarantee that every trip was sterilised. And business went boom, boom!

Then the Old Man got smart. Found a machine that worked cheaper and did the job automatically. Misted up all their buses every night in the yard – with hydrogen peroxide mist which was way more potent. And what the heck, they had to clean the buses anyway, so pushing a button was no effort.

Stopped a lot of people getting ill Billy reckoned. Him and the other drivers for a start. They didn’t seem to come down with the sniffles any more, at least not as much. Of course they still had people throw up on the road, school-kids with motion sickness or whatever.

But thanks to Mrs Bremridge, it was never anything serious. They had sterilised coaches now, the best service on the road. Let those posh London companies chew on that.

Super-healthy Super Kids

Look Ma, no germs! When you're healthy, the whole world is yours
Look Ma, no germs! When you’re healthy, the whole world is yours

As schools go, it’s not big.

350 kids – Year Three to Year Six.

Previous Ofsteds were “Good” and the last one “Outstanding”.

But the thing a lot of parents are starting to notice is, none of the children get sick.

On the wall next to the bursar’s office is a plaque. “For the safety of children and staff, the school premises is sterilised every day in rotation.”

They have to thank the Head Teacher for that. Pat Whatshername. Because she knew 350 kids together in one enclosed place was a sure-fire breeding-ground for colds and collywobbles.

She bullied and cajoled the governors to buy the four auto-robots that spray the place with hydrogen peroxide, four classrooms at a time, every evening after hours.

Buying them would have been a no-go. For a big capital expense like that in one hit, the County Council would have blocked it.

But the Head got smart. Found a way to lease them and got the parents to stump up the cash. Presented the idea to Mums and Dads in her red sweater and boots, with the Princess Grace hair from way back.

The Mums were a bit iffy in their tracky bottoms and sneakers – but the Dads lapped it up. Especially the bit about only £1 per child per month – less than the tea and biscuits they shelled out for every meeting.

So every night, Komnan – he’s from Ghana – sets up the four machines in a different classroom, shutting all the windows and doors. Each of them clicks on and mists the room for around 45 minutes. Toilets and changing rooms are smaller, they get 30 minutes.

The hydrogen peroxide spray is ionised and boosted with colloidal silver. It spreads up and out, destroying germs in mid-air, reaching deep into cracks and crevices.

At a 99.9999% kill rate, no viruses or bacteria survive. If there are any around, it’s when the kids bring in new ones from outside, next day.

Last thing before he goes home, Komnan puts all four machines in the hall – where assemblies, gym and school meals take place – nobody’s coming down with gastro in here.

An “Outstanding” Ofsted – and some really bright kids. With more bounce and go than most you might meet.

Being healthy has to be the answer.