Why taking antibiotics is like chopping off your leg

Crazy girl with knife
Without knowing it, we’re doing ourselves more harm than good

Crazy, right? Round the twist. Who in their right mind would want to chop their leg off?

But that’s how crazy we are when we take antibiotics.

We don’t think so, of course.  But without knowing it, we’re doing ourselves serious harm.

Because antibiotics are prescribed to do one thing – kill bacteria.

Killers as life-savers?

And surprise, surprise, though none of us ever realise it – our own bodies are more bacteria than human, our cells outnumbered by more than 10 to 1.

Seems impossible and about-face, but that’s actually a good thing.

Bacteria are one of the longest-lasting life forms on Earth. Amazing survivors too. Capable of withstanding fierce high temperatures. Triple-figure sub-zero freezing temperatures. Even living and breeding in acid.

Our bodies are colonised by hundreds of trillions of these remarkable creatures. They’re vitally necessary to handle our digestion, produce proteins and manage our immune systems – among thousands of other functions. They live with our human cells in harmony – and we could not exist without them.

So yeah, we take antibiotics to kill bacteria that are harming us. The WRONG bacteria in the WRONG place, running amok among the RIGHT bacteria that are who we are.

Oh dear – chop, chop, chop.

A bomb in the guts

Because in targeting harmful bacteria, those same antibiotics inevitably kill some of our good bacteria too. Their killer action is spread wide to be sure of effectiveness. So our own systems take a hit – though we may not know it at the time.

The bacteria inside us know it though, particularly in our gut. To the trillions and trillions that live in our insides, a dose of antibiotics is like exploding a hydrogen bomb.  Millions get the chop.

Sure some of them regrow, reproducing themselves sometimes in as little as 20 minutes. But not all. Some are damaged and can’t do their job. Others –  the rarer ones – might be lost altogether. Our gut population depleted, our bio-diversity gone.

We might feel the same when our illness passes – back to normal and our usual selves.

But we’re not.

Biggest of the known side effects of antibiotics is growth promotion. The body bulks up very rapidly, putting on weight overnight . Damaged or missing bacteria cause the metabolism to gorge on food more than normal. And to extract a higher proportion of nutrients, directly accelerating the body’s over-development.

Fatter and fatter

See what happens with kids aged two, put on antibiotics. By the time they get to five they’re already overweight, well on their way to increasingly chubby childhood.

It’s this quality that has revolutionised the food industry, enabling factory farms to pump out THREE times the world’s meat and plant crop output in little more than 20 years.

Such weight gain doesn’t happen to everybody.

But it’s already a fact of life – and a key reason why two-thirds of adults are already overweight or obese.  Not just from medical treatments – frighteningly made worse by one third of all prescribed antibiotics being completely unnecessary – but from daily exposure through our FOOD.

You see, spectacular growth boosting in food production has exploded antibiotics use all over the world. Currently 240,000 tonnes annually and rocketing.

That means that through direct dosing with feedstuffs – and even more through indirect absorption of manure used to fertilise, enriching all plant life and those same feedstuffs – all of us receive a small daily intake of antibiotics with every meal we eat. Exactly the way to make us bulk up fast.

Fatter and sicker

Animals and plants quickly get eaten, so their life expectancy is not very high – a few years at most. But we go on for decades, getting steadily fatter, deeper into obesity. More prone to illnesses that obesity brings – diabetes, heart disease, cancer and many others. All long goodbyes.

Not the same as chopping off a leg – but equally unpleasant. And a lot more life-threatening.

Nor is it just getting fat that antibiotics threaten us with.

Damaged or missing bacteria deny us any immunity to serious illness we may have inherited from our parents. Our kids are denied them for the same reason, they’re no longer there to be passed on.

Worse, our bodies start reacting to conditions that aren’t there. Misreading normal signals as hostile, confusing everyday reality with phantom attacks against us.

Which is how, out of nowhere, we develop allergies. Hay fever, eczema or asthma. Or how about urticaria, anaphylactic shock or gluten reactions? People never had them 20 years ago –not in the snowballing number we have now.

Superbugs rule

And then of course – really chopping off our own leg – our undisciplined and wild overuse of antibiotics has triggered the development of superbugs.

Our cure-all miracle drugs are starting not to work any more because bacteria have become immune to them. Antimicrobial resistance.

Yes, well – we wanted to kill off bacteria, But nobody thought we were chopping off bits of ourselves.

So now we sit with life-savers that don’t work, medical surgery brought to a standstill, and all of us steadily getting fatter.

Not a survivable future

Though count on it, the bacteria that brought us down will still be around, long after we’re gone.

Oh yeah, and that antibiotic resistance superbug thing?

Wait till that runs riot across factory farms. Flash pandemics among livestock. No more food for most of us. Death by hunger is not a nice way to go – and we’re probably already too late to stop it.

Chopping off a leg, huh? Looks like we’ve already done it.

Time to reverse this antibiotics debacle now, to get off the train and find alternatives. Other solutions like bacteriophages – something, anything.

Either that, chop, chop – or we’re limping towards a future that doesn’t exist.

Picture Copyright: vatikaki / 123RF Stock Photo

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 3 April 2019 @ 2:18 am

Originally posted on 3 April 2019 @ 2:18 am

Sugar tax, rubbish! Our kids are getting fat from antibiotics. Just like us.

Empty capsules
If we didn’t have antibiotics in the first place, none of this would have happened

Yes, we’re all getting fat. Us and our kids together.

In the last 20 years, something has started us. And since then we’re getting fatter and fatter.

Not from sugary drinks either, so a sugar tax will never work.

Just like it hasn’t worked in Mexico – a ho-hum failure after all the ra-ra.

Once upon a time, we were thin

We never used to be like this. Back in the 90s, we were all pretty trim. In the 80s and 70s, we were practically skinny.

But now, today, we’re a bunch of bulging porkers.

That’s 130 years after Coca Cola was invented (1886). 89 years after Lucozade (1927). And 70 years after Irn Bru (1946).

A few realities for the sugar taxers.

We were not fat when Coke started in the Nineteenth Century. We were not fat for most of the Twentieth Century, during which a whole slew of other popular drinks started.

Not in the 50s. Not in the 60s. Not in the 70s. And only some of us in the 80s.

So it’s not sugary drinks doing it. If Coke was the culprit, how come none of this getting fat business showed up in the first hundred years?

Fatter and fatter

But we ARE definitely getting fat.

On average, men are a whole stone heavier than in 1954 – and THREE INCHES bigger around the waist.  In the last 30 years alone, obesity rates have trebled.

And here’s the score. Two thirds of UK adults are already overweight or obese. So are one third of our kids.

OK, so try this little experiment.

Get yourself two 2-litre bottles of whichever of Public Health England’s super-bad guys you fancy. Now chug those two bottles, one after the other, all in one go.

Can’t be done, can it? Your body won’t let you. Too much of a good thing, your system can’t handle it. Which is natural, right? The body says NO to too much. In this case, too much bulk. There’s not enough space.

Which is what it’s supposed to do.

The same process works with everything we eat and drink. The body knows what it wants – and how much it wants. And shuts off when it’s had enough – satisfied.

But just  look at us. We ARE getting fat when we’re not supposed to. Especially kids.

The body’s NO switch is glitched and keeps saying YES. Nothing to do with Coke. How come?

The real villain

You’re not going to like this. Because it starts when worried Mums first take us to the doctor – fever, swollen glands and glazed eyes. Do something, do something, give us special medicine.

It’s when we first started on antibiotics.

Antibiotics, hmm. Always an iffy question with kids. But antibiotics are miracle drugs, so we push for them. And these days we strong-arm our GPs so much that 10 million of all prescriptions written out for antibiotics are unnecessary.

Worse, as helicopter parents, we keep pushing antibiotics over and over. Sniff, sniff, antibiotics. Teensy tummy problem, antibiotics. So for example, by the time they’re 20, the average American child has had antibiotics SEVENTEEN times.

Which leads us to the awkward truth that most doctors know but prefer not to talk about. That children given antibiotics by the age of two are likely to become obese by the time they’re five.

Huh?

Somehow antibiotics switch their metabolism so they DO drink too many sugary drinks. AND eat too much pizza. AND pig out on burgers with double fries. AND all the other high octane power foods people eat on the go when time is short.

Power food and drink

High octane foods, right? Not “junk”. There’s nothing bad in them to make the body ill. And there’s nothing wrong with the nutrition packed into them either. They just pack more of a charge than other foods – a super-quick boost that satisfies hunger fast.

Which is what the body goes for when its hunger switch says YES. Fill up now – quick, quick.

There might be no need, but that is what the hunger switch says. Go, Go, Go! And a burger you can eat with one hand walking down the street. A quick, high-nutrition charge in minutes.

So we’re getting fat, not because pop foods and drink are bad for us, but because our hunger switch is jammed on YES. We keep eating and keep eating. And like the drink-chugging experiment we tried a moment ago, we only stop when there’s physically no space for more.

All of which we can thank antibiotics for. And this getting fat business is no joke. Because our miracle drugs are the cause of a world-wide obesity epidemic that is rapidly taking us over.

How can we be so sure?

Super growth boosters

Well, who uses antibiotics?

The medical sector, yes. But did you know that around 80% of antibiotics used world-wide are actually used on farms to feed to livestock? 240 THOUSAND TONNES of them every year.

And do you know why?

Since antibiotics were first discovered, their major use has been as GROWTH BOOSTERS. They’re fed to animals to fatten them up. Make them develop bigger, meatier, faster.

Exactly what happens with us.

Every year they’re shovelled into the 1.4 billion cattle, 19 billion chickens, 1 billion sheep and 1 billion pigs that feed us. Vitally necessary to sustain the 7½ billion human beings we have become since our 2½ billion only 50 years ago. A rocketing threefold increase only possible through antibiotics.

And that’s why we’re getting fat.

Every day, every mouthful

Our starting shove is antibiotics we get from the quack while we’re small. Followed by daily top-up doses from the meat we eat laced with antibiotic residues.

And not just meat. The same animals’ manure fertilises our plant crops, so there’s antibiotics in all the fruit, grain and vegetables we eat too.

Because our metabolisms are so similar, our bodies respond like the animals do. They get fat, so we get fat. And with constant antibiotics in our ongoing diets, we keep getting fatter and fatter. Short of ignoring our bodies and eating less, there is no way to avoid it.

Which is why the whole sugar tax thing makes no sense. It’s treating symptoms, not cause. We might just as well tax spinach, or milk, or sausages. Choose any category, let’s tax that.

Yes, we eat and drink too much – but that’s everything across the board, not just sugary stuff.

The real issue is to control our antibiotics intake.

Next to impossible with the demands on world food supplies. Without them, production would fall to the way they were 50 years ago – and 5 billion people would go hungry.

In other words, keep using antibiotics or starve. Big problems for the medics, big problems for the farmers. But until our leaders sort that one out, we’re going to keep getting fat.

Can we top up your Coke?

Picture Copyright: kirillica / 123RF Stock Photo