Should our hospitals work like crime scenes?

Crime scene
The cops can teach us a thing or two about avoiding contamination

Calm down Doc, no-one’s casting nasturtiums.

Truth is, the cops have got something you could maybe use Big Time. Better control of overall hygiene. Stop HAIs dead in their tracks.

Because if you’ve ever watched news coverage of any crime scene investigation, you’ll notice the rozzers are paranoid about one thing – avoiding contamination.

Strict procedure

First thing they do is secure the area – like isolating a patient in quarantine. Nobody in, nobody out – unless properly authorised, signed for and logged. No unwanted outside influences.

Then the SOCO team arrive – Scene of Crime Officers in their bunny suits. Full body covering, face masks, gloves and booties.

Familiar territory?

You bet. Modern crime scenes lean heavily on microbiology – trace evidence, DNA and epithelials. To nail the bad guy, they can’t afford the cops’ own body substances corrupting the evidence.

Uh huh. Exactly like scrubbing and gowning up for surgery. Medics can’t afford to take chances with possible infection. Everything is clinically clean and sterile – anything that touches the patient has to be safe.

Slight difference though, isn’t there?

The cops are concerned their own presence can skew the results.

The biological “life” cloud

They’re better aware of the human biome – that the body is surrounded by billions of bacteria, trailing around like a cloud. That the skin gives off billions more bacteria, along with secretions and the constant sloughing off of dead skin cells.

Because of this sharp awareness, they can secure a conviction from the DNA of a single hair. And it’s already on the cards that just sampling the air of a crime scene may soon yield the identity of suspects entirely from biome traces left behind – long after the bad guy left the building.

Avoid contamination, nail the perp.

Not quite how it works in hospital though, is it?

Because there’s one element the patient on the operating table is not protected from.

Themselves.

The medics are all gowned and sterile, but the patient’s biome is all over the place – floating around the table and throughout the OR.

Blood pressure, check. Pulse, check. Respiration, check. Temperature, check. And what about a pre-op wash? Never mind the screening for MRSA or whatever – one incision and that patient could be self-infected, from normally dormant pathogens suddenly finding an entry into the body.

Something is a little skew about how we prep for hygiene.

Slightly oops

From personal experience of three operations in two hospitals – two hernias and a quad repair – patients themselves are not scrubbed and sterilised the way that doctors and nurses have to be.

Sure, they’re wearing a hospital gown and out cold under general anaesthetic, but they could have breezed in before that, straight off the street – no shower, no bath, not even a hand scrub – maybe even bypassing the hospital’s own sanitising gel stations.

And here it is, direct from the Nursing Times: “Patients should wash or shower using soap and water the evening before surgery.”

The evening before! How many billion billion germ opportunities could that be?

OK, so the op’s a success and the patient goes to the recovery ward. Lots of people with lowered resistance. Lots of incisions and holes for tubes, drips and cannulas.

So in come the relatives, also straight off the street. Ordinary street clothes, trailing outside biome plumes, frequently side-stepping the sanitising gel stations – not even using the one at the foot of the bed.

Yup, you’d better believe it. Even with Covid-19 around, only one in three visitors ever uses the things.

People with a dodgy hygiene record too. Rushed and forgetful like the rest of us, wanting to show care and concern – but often the biggest infection risk of all.

Why?

Sloppy hygiene

Not the way the cops would do it.

Prevent contamination, right?

Which, in The Force, would mean hand gel is obligatory – orders are orders. And containing biomes is paramount – everybody fully enclosed in bunny suits. Yes sir, no sir, three bags full, sir.

Even then, there’s still a major risk of HAIs.

Straight in off the street – it’s cold out there, central heating in here – patients in T-shorts with the bedcovers flung back.

You got it – nose sniffles. Inevitable.

Not cold or flu or anything – but for the first ten minutes, running like a tap. Both nostrils, high up – from the same place where staphylococcus bacteria normally reside passively, or their methicillin-resistant cousins, MRSA. Harmless enough unless something happens.

Harmless as in pat on the cheek or a handshake. Or simply just breathing out, more microbes to join the visiting biome. Potentially lethal if the germs run amok. 80 people die of MRSA every year.

Prevention before cure

At a crime scene, the cops put up a tent – to keep out prying eyes and stop the weather destroying the evidence. The sun to dry things out. The rain to wash them away. Footprints, bloodstains, tyre tracks.

In hospital there’s a Hypersteriliser – as long as staff aren’t too rushed and busy to use it. Every ward made sterile before occupancy by misting up the place with ionised hydrogen peroxide. All viruses and bacteria oxidised to nothing – zero germ threshold. Zero contamination.

Maybe hospitals are already more like crime scenes than we think.

In which case, nice one Doc.

See? Nobody having a go, everybody all on the same side. Just like the cops.

Except those chancers who will not gel their hands.

Well, only one way to deal with them.

“Hey you. You’re nicked!”

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 6 December 2018 @ 3:33 pm

Originally posted on 6 December 2018 @ 3:33 pm

Major infection threat from hospital visitors

Worried visitors
More harm than good – unless you use the gel

Unbelievable.

You’d think we’d know better.

All of us concerned friends and family, visiting sick relatives – and we’re helping to make them sicker.

We know they’re ill, right? That’s why they’re in hospital.

Where we know they’re vulnerable too.

It’s gonna be our fault

All those accident wounds and surgical cuts increase the risk of infection. Especially with so many antibiotic-resistant superbugs like MRSA on the rampage.

Right now ordinary operations like caesareans, chemotherapy, C-sections or biopsies are becoming impossible simply because the drugs don’t work any more.

On top of that there’s a whole witch-hunt going on that NHS hospitals are failing patients through an inadequate care.

And then we show up. Ordinary Tom, Dick and Harriet people – and probably the worst threat yet to catching germs in hospitals.

It’s easy to see why.

What sanitising station?

When we get to hospital, we go blundering in – hey, ho, here we go – what do you mean germs?

Yeah, well. If any doctors or nurses did that, they would get the chop. Busy like you can’t believe, but not one of them goes on duty without a good scrub-up.

They do it again between patients too – proper hot water, soap and brush, the full five-minute job. And with responsibilities pulling them every which way, they’re horrified if they ever get stampeded past it in the heat of the moment – but at least there’s sanitising gel stations everywhere.

Not like us.

There’s in-your-face sanitising stations everywhere you look in hospitals these days – but none of us seems to use them. Blind as a bat and full of ourselves, we never even know they’re there. With one or two exceptions of course – like grandma and grandad, worried about doing the right thing.

No, in we go – each trailing our bio-aura cloud of accompanying bacteria. Hands unwashed, untreated or anything. Straight off the street from whatever we were doing. Anything up to 10 million germs on each hand – dirt, food and faecal matter. Not a care in the world.

Contamination plus

Then it’s hugs, kisses, holding hands, refilling the water glass. If we knew any nurses did that without washing their hands, we’d kick up stink all the way to Westminster.

But not us, we’re a law unto ourselves – and most of us never wash our hands anyway.

So is it any wonder that patients stay in longer and get complications – that Hospital Acquired Infections (HAIs) are on the up?

There’s the professional medics taking flak for lapses in procedure and hygiene – when all the time we’re this bunch of uncaring bozos, infecting the place left, right and centre and not even knowing that we’re doing it.

Check it out, it’s a hospital. Most of the time always meticulous about hygiene, guarding against germs and keeping things clean. Yes, there are lapses – as always when people are rushed off their feet, doing multiple jobs at once. Too many patients, too many complications, most of them from germs which WE put there.

And then there’s us.

Careless too

Coats and scarves spread over the bed. Coughing and sneezing because it’s winter out there. Hands unwashed since breakfast or before – not even after the loo.

Filthy mitts (yes filthy because you can’t see germs, they’re too small) all over the high-touch areas that patients touch too – bedside cupboard, bed table, grab rails. Re-adjusting pillows that they’ll breathe into later, pulling up the blanket that their hands rest on, reading.

If matron had the slightest idea how we’re contaminating her patients, she sling us out on our ear.

She does of course, but she’s not allowed to. Misplaced courtesy and tolerance. Ideally, she would lock her patients away – restricted visitors – like in ICU. Not to penalise patients, but protect them from us – walking germ factories with our sloppy hygiene.

Think we’re kidding? Hospitals are where people are already down, resistance low from whatever their condition. Any hole, any incision, the slightest break in the skin and they’re vulnerable to infection.

And have they got holes. Wounds from surgery, tubes, pipes, wires into the body – even a simple drip puts a cannula on their wrist.

You can see it happening, can’t you. Tolerant Mum with her newborn second, letting her first-born explore all the tubes. Germs straight in, intravenously. Whoops – staphylococcus aureus, or a urinary infection. Another week in hospital. More headlines about inadequacy.

Unclean like the plague

Yeah, we’re bad. So bad we shouldn’t be allowed in.

Not without a facemask and hands gelled so they show up under UV light – just like getting into nightclubs. No stamp on your wrist, you can’t come in. No glow on your hands, stay out of the ward.

But it won’t happen, will it? We already don’t wash our hands and then wonder why we get gastro after eating a burger. The penny never drops.

And so we go on. Visitor monsters.

Do we have to become patients ourselves to learn about proper hygiene?

Originally posted on 26 November 2018 @ 10:12 am

Kiss goodbye to sepsis – today and every day

Lips
For the love of life, we all need to show we care

Let every pair of beautiful lips remind you.

How beautiful life is. How much love there is in the world.

And how easily it is all taken away – with a simple scratch, a little cut, one of those nothings we never think about.

Infection – kiss of death

Because, little scratch or no, if ever the germs take over, suddenly you’re faced with raging illness.

What’s happening to you, is it a major disease? Ebola, malaria, or polio?

You can’t talk. You can’t stop shivering. Your muscles ache. You can’t go to the loo. You can’t catch your breath. You’re convinced you’re going to die. And your skin suddenly looks awful.

It’s major all right – a major infection called sepsis.

Never heard of it?

One of our biggest killers

Neither had the 37,000 other people it kills every year. Dead from infection that ran out of control and took over their bodies. Dead because antibiotics didn’t work – the bacteria that triggered everything is immune to them.

But that’s why the lips.

A beautiful girl called Emma Straker loved wearing red lipstick. Out of nowhere she came down with sepsis and died, only 19. Red lips are how she’s remembered.

Since then, concerned people everywhere have helped raise money to fight this dreadful affliction. They show their support by taking a selfie with red lips – and posting it with a donation to the UK Sepsis Trust.

Even more so today – because all over the country, it’s Kiss Goodbye to Sepsis Day.

Because with care and early enough treatment, sepsis can be beaten.

Prevention is better than cure

It starts with a simple infection.

So the best possible defence is to avoid contact with germs in the first place – not always easy, not always possible.

But at least germs can be stopped dead in any room BEFORE you step into it – sterilised with hydrogen peroxide.

Zero germ threshold, zero exposure.  All it needs is a Hypersteriliser. Daily treatment so that nothing ever gets a foothold again – in schools, hotels, restaurants, public offices, buses, trains, planes, work places, hospitals, care homes, everywhere.

So that any cut or chest infection or other minor ailment isn’t escalated by other bacteria into a raging, out-of-control monster.

People do survive sepsis. Some completely, some with a lasting disability.

Hygiene – kiss of life

Those lips can remind us that it’s possible – with kisses all over the hospital wards where sepsis is treated – kiss-marks to mark successful recovery.

Just like the walls of palm prints in Africa which proclaim “I survived Ebola”.

Sepsis is whole body infection run out of control. All of us can get it, if we’re unlucky or careless.

And all of us can avoid it – by upping our hygiene habits. (Tweet this)

That really is the kiss of life.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 13 September 2018 @ 4:17 am

Originally posted on 13 September 2018 @ 4:17 am