Tag Archives: candida auris

Killer fungus candida auris is NOT getting a chance in our hospitals

No to candida auris
It might be a global threat, but with our hydrogen peroxide protection, it’s not going to find a home here

Persistent and multi-drug resistant, the new candida auris superbug is not a pandemic yet, and despite fears of its rampant onset, is not going to be.

Worrying because unlike most funguses, it seems to spread from person to person – a yeast that colonises the skin and therefore transfers on contact.

It’s also nosocomial, particularly present in hospitals where it targets the already ill – those patients with surgical incisions or intravenous feeds, apertures in the body that provide the way in.

That makes it a real hazard to patients and health care givers – easily contaminating clothing, linen, bedrails, chairs, catheters and all kinds of surrounding equipment. A “touch it if you dare” situation requiring isolation if possible – a strain on already stretched NHS resources.

Hard to come clean

To make things more difficult, candida auris is also resilient against the usual cleaning agents. Recommended is chlorine-based treatment at 1,000ppm dilution – as strong as can be risked without harming surroundings.

Even so, the bug persists, frequently demanding action the hard way – repeated deep cleans and the closing down of ward and ICU facilities among the 35 hospitals affected.

One of them however knows it’s got the bug beaten – showing the way for others to get themselves candida auris-free. We can’t tell which hospital it is, as all work of this nature has to be confidential.

Suffice it to say though, that after two deep cleans and much worry, one particular hospital has solved the problem overnight and banished candida auris from its corridors.

Clearing up with mist

The solution?

Misting up affected areas with ionised hydrogen peroxide – a quick and effective way to neutralise ALL germs immediately.

This process does require facilities to be completely vacated – though it is possible to section off areas with  protective PVC sheeting and handle the job piecemeal.

Once clear, the hydrogen peroxide is released into the air, to spread in all directions and against all surfaces. The ionising forces wide dispersal and electrostatic attraction to pathogens – clamping to them like magnets and ripping them apart by oxidising them.

The hospital involved made one phone call and 24 hours later the job was done – all clear and back to normal, ready for the onset of winter. No candida auris, no anything – sterilised, safe and secure.

Good to know we have effective defences – especially with authorities like Forbes magazine and America’s CDC regarding candida auris as a global threat.

Breathe easy, Japanese fungus – candida auris – can be beaten

Yoga breathing
Relax, no fungus here – the air is germ-free and safe to breathe

That’s right, breathe.

Easy lungfuls, nice and deep.

That Japanese fungus can’t get you. Nor can any other viruses, bacteria or fungi.

Because there aren’t any.

They’ve all been oxidised by hydrogen peroxide mist. Ripped to shreds and annihilated. Not ever coming back.

Which is good news for all those hospitals having a problem with it.

No more new cases of candida auris, they can go back to normal.

Except of course for those patients already under treatment. A continuing problem with a fungus so persistently drug-resistant. Not so easy to fix once infection has taken hold.

But easy enough to PREVENT in the first place – just by pushing a button.

Deep cleans that don’t

Oh sure, there have been plenty deep cleans – they just seldom seem to be effective. Bleach, steam, ammonium quats – nothing wants to work.

That’s because 80% of affected areas haven’t been touched.

No, we’re not being critical, just addressing the reality.

All that rub and scrub – often with quite toxic chemicals. Phew the smell!

But that’s only applied to surfaces – floors, walls, furniture, drapery. The air itself is untouched – and that’s 80% of the room space. Waiting for someone to breathe.

And we’re talking fungus here, which means lots of spores.

AIRBORNE spores, floating around all over the place. Because that’s what spores do. It’s how fungi reproduce and spread – riding every little waft and draught, looking for new homes.

Like the skin of a hospital patient, or their bedclothes. Or getting breathed in, along with oxygen, dust  particles and other microbes. Or swallowed with food.

It’s what they do – small enough and light enough to dissipate everywhere. Yes, some of it settles and the deep clean gets it – but what about the stuff that doesn’t?

Down and dirty

And what about the fungus itself? Where it gathers and likes to breed?

Warmth and damp are what it likes – which immediately raises difficulties.

Cleaning down surfaces is easy enough, but what about those un-get-at-able places? Behind the drippy pipes and in the damp around sinks and basins? Or in the cracks between tiles, where even a good go with a toothbrush won’t reach?

Impossible to get to when your target is less than 2 microns across.

So that’s the air space – and all the cracks – that those totally thorough deep cleans have missed. No wonder so many hospitals are having a problem. And all of us at home too, a fungus isn’t picky.

Sayonara candida

OK, so press the button. Make the problem go away.

The one that says “Start” on the front panel of a Hypersteriliser machine.

After a delay to give yourself time to get clear, a super-fine mist of ionised hydrogen peroxide takes to the air, spreading in all directions.

Mist, right? So it fills the air, super-small particles of hydrogen peroxide lighter than any microbe. And ionised too. Made more potent by changing into a plasma – thousands of times more powerful with the release of other antimicrobials.

So it does two things.

Rush and grab

One, its electrostatically-charged particles actively seek to escape from each other, forcibly dispersing themselves away as far as they can get. Through the air and deep into cracks – less than 2 microns in width.

Two, that same electrostatic charge actively reaches out and grabs oppositely-charged microbes. Bacteria, viruses, fungi – they all get clamped in a death-grip and ripped apart by oxygen atoms.

Two seconds contact time is all it needs – but 40 minutes is the time usually set on the machine. More than enough to generate, disperse, locate and terminate everything in an average-sized room.

Safe, sterile and secure

Result, the place is sterile. Through the air, on every surface – under, behind and on top of every object.

No germs anywhere – INCLUDING candida auris.

Which is how come you can breathe easy.

No chance of any infection – not even coughs and sniffles.

That Japanese fungus is gone with our best ninja yell.

Hiya!

Picture Copyright: ammentorp / 123RF Stock Photo