Tag Archives: antibiotics

Worldwide obesity: the staggering figures – though there IS hope AND help

Special thanks to John Wright of Renew Bariatrics for the inspiration of this article

Pig out in paradise
Yes, we’re obese because we eat too much – but our bodies don’t naturally do that

Our thanks to reader John Wright who recently treated us to an in-depth heads up on the sheer scale of worldwide obesity.

Backed by some fierce number-crunching, John has created a report on Obesity Rankings by Country complete with an interactive map for at-a-glance perspective.

Obesity and antibiotics

His figures reinforce what we’ve been banging on about for ever. That in countries where food production reaches industrial proportions – factory farms and concentrated animal feeding operations – obesity is the highest.

And we’ve been banging on because it’s food production boosted by ANTIBIOTICS. Deliberately added to feedstuffs for their spectacular growth promoting qualities. They make things mature bigger, better, fatter, faster:

  1. To make more money in shorter time – the farmers’ get-rich-quick
  2. To sustain world population increase – tripling from 2½ billion in 1950 to 7½ billion today
World’s most efficient growth boosters

Fatter animals mean fatter us.

Because residual antibiotics are present in everything we eat. If not from the animals, then from vegetables and plants fertilised by their manure. Exactly like them, we get low-dose antibiotics with every mouthful.

And exactly like them, we bulk up.

Without conscious control, our bodies crave energy-dense meals – the quick charge, fill-you-up satisfaction of so-called junk foods. Not actually junk at all, but concentrated nutrition in easy hand-held form.

But food animals don’t live long. They bulk up quick and go to market.

We bulk up quick and keep going. Getting fatter and fatter – and more and more unhealthy.

The obesity downside

Ten years down the line, diabetes, asthma, heart disease, cancer – we have a lot to look forward to.

And the only way out of it – eat less. Go cold turkey.

Stop eating energy-dense meals, or cut down on them. Choose foods that don’t contain antibiotics – almost impossible these days as everything in the supermarket has them.

But if you have the will power, it is possible to slim down. Possible but not easy. Because dieting doesn’t work.

Which comes back to John’s report. Because John’s organisation is all about bariatrics – the surgical way to get weight off. By gastric sleeve, gastric bypass, gastric balloon, duodenal switch or gastric banding .

Expensive, but doable. And increasingly desirable, worldwide.

Not because it makes you look slimmer, but because it could save your life.

Obesity only goes one way. And diabetes, asthma, heart disease and cancer are all killer conditions. Unpleasant and painful.  Slowly taking away self esteem, dignity, agility, mobility, strength, self sufficiency – and after much suffering, life.

Want proof that it’s antibiotics doing all this worldwide?

Smoking gun

Take a look at John’s map again. At the places where obesity is the highest of all. Yes, predictably in advanced countries with mass food production systems – USA, Canada, UK and Australia.

But through the roof in the Pacific paradise islands – Micronesia, the Marshalls, Nauru, Kimbati, Tuvalu, Samoa, Tonga, Niue – and highest of all, the Cook Islands.

All places that not long ago were all subsistence cultures – living off the sea and tropical fruits. But now “developed” – with almost all food entirely imported. Food produced in the mass production countries – and laced through with antibiotics.

A few months back we pointed out that being fat is not natural. That normally healthy bodies know what to eat and how much of it – and to stop when they’ve had enough.

Doughnut link

But antibiotics override all of that. Gimme high powered food now – more, more, more!

Exactly the same as in the Arab countries. Once simple desert cultures – tough people, resilient and stick thin. Now oil-rich and sophisticated, increasingly bloated and fleshy – imported foodstuffs again, antibiotics in everything.

No easy way out

Shouldn’t we stop antibiotics?

Well, yes – we should. They’re starting to fail worldwide anyway – bacteria developing immunity from such massive overuse.

Except what will keep us alive when we’re sick or need surgery?

And what will keep the animals alive that feed us?

For sure, antibiotics push production levels so high they’re the only way to sustain our 3 times population numbers on the same land area as we had 50 years ago.

They also keep those animals alive. Because the living conditions are so intense, crowded and unhygienic, antibiotics are essential  for their very survival.

Take away the antibiotics and the animals all die.

And we die too for nothing to eat.

The only alternative is for us all to eat less. Forcing ourselves to cut down and stay that way –  exactly like addicts coming off mainline drugs.

John’s map represents an alternative worldwide. The bariatric option.

Either way is sacrifice, but time is running out. Already two-thirds of us are overweight or obese and we’re eating ourselves to death.

Thank you John. Now we know it’s time to do something.

Antibiotics crisis: what Public Health England is NOT telling us

Doctor with capsule
Antibiotics might save lives quick – they’re also the slow-burning fuse to world srtarvation

Antibiotics crisis is an understatement – it’s an all-out world-wide calamity.

“One of the most dangerous global crises facing the modern world today,” says Professor Paul Cosford, medical director at Public Health England.

But he’s not telling us why.

Antibiotic resistance is the impending threat he refers to – and he’s not wrong.

Ramping up fast is the failure of ALL antibiotics to halt infections caused by bacteria – and with it, the complete collapse of modern medicine.

According to England’s Chief Medical Officer, Professor Dame Sally Davies, without antibiotics minor infections become deadly – while surgery, chemotherapy and caesareans simply become too dangerous.

Wake up, world!

It’s a little late to be surprised. Since antibiotics were first discovered by Alexander Fleming in 1928, we’ve known that sooner or later bacteria would develop immunity.

Bacteria are the world’s hardiest survivors  – and imagining that we would be safe from them with antibiotics was always going to be wishful thinking.

Over billions of years, bacteria have learnt to survive freezing, boiling, living without  oxygen or water, in acid or alkaline environments, in light or pitch darkness. What makes us think we can succeed where the elements haven’t?

The track record is not good. So far, we’ve been lucky if an antibiotic succeeds for more than 10 years.  A few examples:

  • Tetracycline introduced 1950, resistance identified 1959.
  • Erythromycin introduced 1953, resistance identified 1968.
  • Methicillin introduced 1960, resistance identified 1962.
  • Gentamycin introduced 1967, resistance identified 1979.
  • Vancomycin introduced 1972, resistance identified 1988.
  • Ceftazidime introduced 1985, resistance identified 1987.
  • Levofloxacin introduced 1996, resistance identified THE SAME YEAR.
  • Ceftaroline introduced 2010, resistance identified 2011.

Devastating stuff.

Which is why medics are jumping up and down about overuse accelerating this resistance – putting the brakes on the public demanding our Twenty-First Century miracle cure. Because as many as 25% of all antibiotic prescriptions are totally unnecessary.

Tip of the iceberg

But that’s not the real problem, or even the beginning of it.

It’s antibiotics’ amazing side effect we’re turning our backs on. And already it makes the whole resistance issue look like a sideshow.

Ever since antibiotics started being used, researchers noted their extraordinary ability to promote growth. Bodies grew quicker, bulked up heavier, super-developing in months instead of years.

They didn’t need a full strength dose either – the kind to clobber an infection. A little and often was enough, a regular under-dose to start the growth spurt and keep it going.

Don’t believe it? Then ask yourself what’s the real reason two thirds of us are overweight or obese – and a third of our kids too? Animals get antibiotics, we eat them, we bulk up same as they do.

Wholesale overuse worldwide

Today 280,000 TONNES of antibiotics are pumped into farming animals around the world. Supposedly restricted to comply with overuse regulations. But actually a necessity to sustain the explosion of world human population.

From 2½ billion in the 1950s when antibiotics began to be used in any volume, to the 7½ billion we are today. Essential to produce the the 19 billion chickens, 1.4 billion cattle, 1 billion pigs and 1 billion sheep that currently feed us.

And right there is the Catch 22.

Modern factory farm methods are so concentrated and so intense that animals literally live on top of each other. Crowded, living in each other’s filth, conditions are so unhygienic that antibiotics really are essential for survival. On top of the growth boosting function they’re already administered for.

And guess what?

Antibiotics are starting to fail for farm animals too. They HAVE to be used to keep up numbers, but fight a losing battle against increasing antimicrobial resistance.

End of the world coming

Which means it’s going to happen.

One day soon, animals will start to die. Penned into slum-like conditions with no protection, an epidemic that will sweep through them like wildfire.

Containing it will be impossible, because there’ll be no defence. The antibiotics won’t work, so things can only go one way.

Which means wholesale animal deaths worldwide.

And the end of the food supply that sustains the extra 5 billion people that we have become since antibiotics enabled such huge production capability.

Two thirds of the world population.

Because bacteria always win.

Because we’re too stupid to realise that defence against them is a moving target, that they will always evolve to find a way round.

We’re all going to die

And that by the time we wake up to that fact, we’ll be dead.

Antibiotics crisis is right. And that’s what Public Health England aren’t telling us.

It really could be the end of the world.

Antibiotics Armageddon: as deadly as the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs – and already on the way

Dinosaur Armageddon
The end of the world as we know it? Except it won’t be quick and sudden – get ready for a long and painful slide

Better believe it, we’re going the way of the dinosaurs.

Billions of us wiped out.

Gone.

And it’s already happening.

Except in slo-mo, not in an exploding fireball instant.

Ten, twenty years and more. No rush. Not taken out in a split-second asteroid flash.

But shoving us towards extinction just as surely as the dinosaurs.

Pushed by antibiotics.

Killer wonder-drugs

Yes, the very same wonder-drugs we’ve come to rely on as life-savers. Miracle rescue medicines to save us from every infection – so universally prescribed, we chomp them like sweets.

Yet even now doctors are worried these drugs are being overwhelmed by antimicrobial resistance. Mutating bacteria, immune to anything we throw at them.

Increasingly, our miracle antibiotics don’t work. And the day is fast approaching when none of them will.

Devastating, yes. But that’s not the direction the fireball is coming from.

And we cannot escape because it’s in every mouthful of the food we eat – every swallow of the liquids we drink.

No, not from any deadly bacteria – even though our defence is weakening against them.

It’s our own bacteria-killers that are doing the job. The ones the bugs are immune to. Those very same antibiotics that are supposed to protect us.

All you can eat and more

You see, antibiotics aren’t just prescribed as medicines. Beyond miracle germ killers, they’re miracle growth boosters too. Administered to animals and plants to make them, grow bigger, fatter, faster. 240,000 tons of them shovelled in every year.

And that’s where the Armageddon comes in. Accelerated by our own dinosaur thinking.

And our own numbers.

Since antibiotics were first started as growth boosters, the world’s population has multiplied three times over. From 2½ billion in the 1950s to 7½ billion today.

And without antibiotics to boost growth for food production, we wouldn’t be able to exist.

There’s antibiotics in feedstuff for beef cattle, pigs, sheep, poultry, fish – you name it. And they’re fed to plants to improve yield – cereals, grain crops, fruit and vegetables. Either directly as injections or additives. Or indirectly, from the manure of the animals fed antibiotics in the first place.

Which means antibiotics are in the soil too, leached in from the manure – down into the water table and out into our streams and rivers. Turn on your tap for a glass of water  and there’s traces of antibiotics right there.

Big, like the dinosaurs we are becoming

Result, every mouthful, every swallow, we  are ingesting more of the most efficient growth booster the world has ever known. And like the animals, we too grow bigger, fatter, faster. Not helped by too little exercise, a couch potato lifestyle and an increasing appetite for more and more food.

Look around and the proof is everywhere. Two thirds of adults are already overweight or obese – and one third of our kids. And we’re going to keep getting bigger – with everything that obesity brings: diabetes, cancer, heart disease – unless we get off antibiotics.

OK, but that means getting the animals off too. Which we can’t do because modern intensive farming systems are so intensified that regular antibiotics are necessary just to keep them alive.

Which itself is a Catch 22 – because just as antibiotics stop working against germs in humans, they stop working against germs in animals too. Like us, they are no longer protected.

But they have to be fed antibiotics anyway or they won’t grow fast enough and big enough to sustain the food supply.

Back to the Dark Ages

So we’re damned if we do, and damned if we don’t. Both us and the animals.

The antibiotics don’t kill germs anymore, so we’re more at risk than ever. And the animals we eat are at risk too. Less and less of them are going to survive, which means less and less for us to eat.

Like it or not, we’re going back to how it was before antibiotics ever existed.

Which means no growth boosters in the food chain – and only enough animals to support 2½ billion people.

Uh huh. A shortfall of 5 billion.

So if we don’t succumb to the slow onset of diabetes, cancer, heart disease and all the other dangers of serious obesity, we’re going to go hungry.

5 billion people wiped out at a stroke. Just like the dinosaurs. And every bit as devastating as our poor Earth getting hit by a 1 kilometre sized piece of rock out of the blue.

Oops.

Picture Copyright: elenaphotos21 / 123RF Stock Photo

Antibiotics: we got them wrong like Fleming said – and now we’ve totally blown it

Doc with bugs
All this worrying with antibiotics resistance neglects the even bigger killer of obesity

Miracle lifesavers, antibiotics. But like Fleming predicted back in the 50s, a double-edged sword.

Because yes, antibiotics did what that they said on the tin – kill bacteria. Except they bounced back if you didn’t kill enough of them.

A bit like bombing an ants’ nest, which all the pest control guys can tell you about. Make sure you get ALL the ants – because if there’s any survivors, they’ll be back.

Not only that, they’ll be uglier and tougher – better able to withstand the next bomb you chuck them. Tougher resistance, a new strength to breed into all future generations.

Exactly like bacteria – which develop antimicrobial resistance if not clobbered hard enough. Mutating to a new superbug that antibiotics can’t kill.

And because bacteria can interact with each other, passing on their immunity to other bacteria types. Antibiotic resistance out of nowhere, even though never exposed to them.

Wrong and wronger

All of which is now rubbished by new research just published in the British Medical Journal – that antibiotics should be used sparingly – until the patient is better and not necessarily until the fully prescribed course runs out.

Yeah, right.

Like swallowing only one paracetamol capsule for that thumping headache instead of two – so there’s more left when it’s needed. How does that work?

Frankly if there’s bacteria giving you grief and you’re at death’s door, common sense says keep going to make sure you get rid of all of them. No pussy-footing round with half-measures that let your symptoms recur.

Exactly like if you’re painting a floor, you buy enough to cover the whole thing – not just a small tin that does half of it.

Yeah, but – the research boffins are going to say. There’s no evidence to suggest that under-dosing  causes antibiotic resistance.

Sure guys, whatever.

Growth boosters

But there’s a MONUMENTAL stack of evidence that under-dosing DOES boost body growth. Fleming and his team came across that from the get-go. A phenomenon that farmers have been relying on for the last 50 years – to produce enough food to support the nearly THREE TIMES population explosion the world has had since.

OK, good – so there’s enough food. Achieved by making animals grow bigger, faster.

But now the tail’s wagging the dog.

Because the boffins haven’t twigged it yet, but it’s staring us in the face.

With antibiotics already being gobbled up by animals, that means there’s antibiotics in everything we eat. Not big doses, meant to kill bacteria. But little drip-drip doses, deliberately used to make bodies grow fatter.

In other words, ours. Because – surprise, surprise – we’re animals too.

So behold the “overfat” girls of the UK and the US – the fattest in the world.

Better include Australia, Canada and all of Western Europe too – it’s become an epidemic. Because fact: two thirds of British adults are already seriously overweight or obese – and so are one third of our kids.

Uh huh, the writing’s on the wall, so listen up BMJ readers  – antibiotics cause obesity.

Obesity epidemic

It starts with childhood, where the first antibiotics we get trigger infant obesity.  Followed up by steady antibiotics throughout adolescence, so that by the time a teenager reaches 20, they’ve been exposed to antibiotics at least SEVENTEEN TIMES.

And all the time we’re all getting drip-drip under-doses of antibiotics every day. In the meat we eat. In the vegetables grown with manure from the same animals, or in soil enriched from the same source. They’re even in our water supply, leached in through the soil to our streams and rivers.

Right now the medics are worried about antibiotic resistance and that 700,000 people will die.

But obesity leads to… Fleming would turn in his grave.

Take your pick from asthma, diabetes, limb amputation, heart disease or cancer – a long, slow death for 30 MILLION people – almost half the population of UK.

30 MILLION people – how wrong do you want to get?

And it’s not going to stop, because antibiotics are essential to sustain food production for the 7½ billion people that inhabit the planet today. Pull the plug, and food levels go back to the 1950s and 5 BILLION people will die.

Like we said, how wrong do you want to get?

Not short-term lifesavers, but long-term killers.

Fleming was right, we’d get antibiotic resistance.

Except that’s not the problem any more. It’s the obesity epidemic.

But instead of searching round for an ALTERNATIVE, like bacteriophages – all our top medics blame SUGAR and look the other way.

Any excuse to avoid reality, hey?

Slow motion suicide – always getting closer with every meal you eat

Shocked eaters
Get real – everything you eat makes you fat, not just junk food. And getting fat will kill you – in 10 or 20 years’ time

That’s right, suicide. The act of killing yourself.

Because you can’t beat bacteria, however hard you try.

Like with antibiotics – our life-saving miracle drugs.

They’re made to kill bacteria, sure – but only in the short term.

Stick around a few years, and those all-surviving microbes will be back with immunity. Mutated into superbugs with built-in antibiotic resistance. Get sick with one of those and nothing can save you.

The ultimate survivors

Because, as the oldest surviving life forms on the planet, bacteria always win.

For instance, right back in 1928 Alexander Fleming discovered the first antibiotic, penicillin. Yet just twelve years later, penicillin-resistant staph emerged, in 1940.

It’s been the same ever since.

  • Tetracycline introduced 1950, resistance identified 1959.
  • Erythromycin introduced 1953, resistance identified 1968.
  • Methicillin introduced 1960, resistance identified 1962.
  • Gentamycin introduced 1967, resistance identified 1979.
  • Vancomycin introduced 1972, resistance identified 1988.
  • Ceftazidime introduced 1985, resistance identified 1987.
  • Levofloxacin introduced 1996, resistance identified THE SAME YEAR.
  • Ceftaroline introduced 2010, resistance identified 2011.
Armageddon One

Which is why our top-level medics are going crazy. Because antibiotic resistant superbugs are constantly turning up in our food. We eat the food, and those superbugs are inside our systems.

Sometimes they strike immediately, sometimes they take their time. But all the while, they’re there – and there’s no drug in the medicine cupboard that doctors can use to stop them.

How did it get like this?

Well, amazing as antibiotics are at saving lives – they’re even more amazing at making animals fat. From an egg to a roasting chicken in 6 weeks. From newborn calf to an Aberdeen Angus steak in 14 months.

Which is why farming uses 240,000 TONNES of antibiotics every year.

And how antibiotics get into everything we eat.

Pumped full of antibiotics themselves, the animals are the start of a whole food production nutrition chain. The manure they make is used to fertilise plants and food crops – all natural, so that even includes organics.

The manure leaches into the soil too, so it finds its way into the water table. From there into streams and rivers – into our water supply and irrigation systems – and into the kitchen tap.

So that everything we put in our mouths – food and drink – contains residual doses of antibiotics, deliberately put there to make things grow.

Armageddon Two

Which is what they do to our bodies too – make them grow. Impossible to resist, we’re being fed the greatest growth boosters ever invented.

And exactly as expected, we get fat. Which is why two thirds of British adults are now seriously overweight or obese. Plus one third of our kids.

Which is where the slow motion suicide comes in.

Most diseases and infections happen quickly. Days or weeks to incubate, usually only months to claim their victims.

But obesity is a slow killer.

First the complications from carrying all that weight. Weakened bones, muscular problems, structural failure.

Then respiration issues, gulping for air, heart double-timing for more oxygen, breathing problems and asthma.

Next,  it’s fat secretions around the pancreas. Insulin deficiencies leading to diabetes. Heart disease and cancer inevitably follow.

Slow, slower, slowest…

But not quickly.

All this happens slowly over tens of years. Without our bodies feeling it happen – yet all the while, driven by antibiotics. Eating more than we should, putting on more and more weight. Not even conscious that we’re doing it.

Until one day, hello Size Eighteen and a body that’s 20 stone plus.

And every day, worse and worse.

Often in pain, feeling weaker, less capable- wheezing and waddling our way through the day. Until we collapse on the bed that’s harder and harder to leave. Lapsing into deadly but unwitting suicide, every bit as successful as a .38 calibre bullet.

Miracle life-savers – yeah right.

Without our knowing it, antibiotics are bringing the death sentence to every one of us.

OK, so our doctors are worried about antibiotic resistant superbugs. Hoo-ray.

Meanwhile, our obesity epidemic spreads unchecked. Dismissively put down to junk food and sedentary lifestyles. Fat people are vilified for a condition they did not ask for and cannot control.

So, suicide

And nothing gets done.

Suicide, plain and simple.

I overeat, you overeat, he/she overeats, we overeat, they overeat.

You have been warned.

Picture Copyright: auremar / 123RF Stock Photo

How under-powered disinfectants can actually create superbugs

Pointing to biohazard symbol
Make that disinfectant solution too weak – and you’ll make it antibiotic resistant, sure as anything

Kill germs. Make you safe. It’s what disinfectants are supposed to do.

But only if you let them.

Only if they’re at full strength – and applied for full contact time.

Maximum bleach, flat-out for 30 minutes. Complete exposure.

None of this diluted and sloshed around with a wet rag nonsense.

Resistance in the making

Anything less than full power and there are germ survivors.

Maybe not many of them, but they are the toughies that win through.

Hit them again and they’re less likely to succumb.

They’ve learnt how to resist, mutated to become immune.

Bacteria for instance, have in-built protein pumps that expel toxic substances from their cells. “Efflux pumps” to remove disinfectants AND antibiotics, making bugs drug-resistant.

And how dangerous is that?

OK, so there is a work surface, perhaps for food prep. Wiped down for 30 seconds with a usual 6% bleach solution, everyone thinks it’s disinfected, safe.

Instead, it’s alive with MRSA – methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus.

Already resistant to antibiotics, it easily resists to the under-dose of bleach.

Too weak, not long enough – did you feel a breeze, just then?

Not good enough

So now it’s resistant to bleach too – sodium hypochlorite.

Or maybe chlorhexidine – the preferred disinfectant for instruments. Which in its underpowered state can trigger resistance to colistin – an antibiotic of last resort. As discovered by researchers investigating klebsiella pneumoniae – a superbug capable of causing pneumonia, meningitis and urinary tract infections.

Uh huh. So somebody comes down with MRSA – redness, swelling, pain and high temperature.

They have to be isolated to keep others safe. Quarantined in a separate room. Only handled with gloves, apron and mask for protection.

And OK, the food prep area is suspect – so it’s done again.

More 6% solution – more thorough this time, wiped down and scrubbed for 5 minutes.

Still not enough.

MRSA still in residence – along with a few other bugs it’s passed on its immunity to.

Resistant to bleach and antibiotics too.

Last resort defences breached

Like carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE) – unlikely in the everyday, but possible in hospital.

Dangerous?

Oh yes.

Carbapenem is the other group of our last-resort antibiotics. The ones to use when all else fails. If they don’t work – and colistin too – the poor patient is up a gumtree. Only clever doctors and the very best care can bring them back.

Meanwhile, that food prep area is still unsafe.

Scrubbed raw, it still contaminated with MRSA.

Still a place for other bacteria to learn how to survive first bleach, then antibiotics.

How antibiotic resisdtance happensAnd now it’s too late.

Flood the place for hours in 100% bleach solution – that MRSA still knows how to overcome it.

However strong the treatment, anything made up on that food prep area will still be contaminated. That MRSA is there for keeps.

Unless of course, you change the rules.

Game changer

After the rub and scrub, mist the place up with ionised hydrogen peroxide (iHP).

Because NO GERM can survive being ripped apart by oxygen atoms. Which is what happens in the 30 seconds that electrostatically-charged iHP particles physically grab hold of bacteria, viruses and fungi, oxidising them to oblivion.

And that’s only a 6% solution too. But ionised to hundreds of times the firepower by becoming a plasma. Releasing other antimicrobials – hydroxyl radicals, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, ozone and ultraviolet.

No rub and scrub either – the stuff disperses in actively all directions, forced apart by that same electrostatic charge. Through the air, hard up against all surfaces, deep into cracks and crevices.

Not just disinfecting, but sterilising. Making ALL GERMS dead. 99.9999% gone – to a 6-Log Sterility Assurance Level. No bugs, no superbugs, no nothing.

Under-strength disinfectants – that’s really playing with fire.

There are enough superbugs already resistant to antibiotics. We don’t need any more.

Picture Copyright: michaklootwijk / 123RF Stock Photo and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Listen up G20, antibiotics are already off the rails, start funding alternatives

Doctor derailed
Long-term antibiotics are a train smash – for the sake of global health, it’s time to get the G20 back on track

Let’s hope the G20 can get it right.

Meeting in Berlin, world health ministers have agreed to tackle antibiotics resistance.

They need to do a lot more than that, these miracle wonder drugs are now right off the track.

Yeah, OK – antibiotics resistance. Superbugs immune to everything we throw at them. Caused by over use and abuse of antibiotics – two thirds of all prescriptions are unnecessary.

But tightening up procedures is not likely to achieve anything. Not when 70% of antibiotics are not used on humans at all, but on animals.

Not to make them better, but to fatten them up.

How resistance is created

So sure, there’s over use and abuse – 240,000 tonnes of it every year. The world has 7½  billion people to feed and there’s money to be made doing it.

So never mind that an antibiotic like colistin is held back by doctors as a drug of last resort. There’s a factory in China producing 10,000 tonnes of it a year – to fatten up pigs.

Which means superbug immunity is accelerating all the time. On volumes like that, bacteria have plenty of opportunity to develop resistance. And pass their invulnerability on to others.

And it gets worse.

Not only are bacteria resistant to antibiotics, they’re becoming resistant to antiseptics and disinfectants too. So that doctors and care workers THINK they’ve scrubbed and scoured their hands clean – and they’re still covered in superbugs.

Resistance and fatness

Worse still, the antibiotics fed to animals get into the human food chain. Via residues in meat and in manure used for cultivation. In such volumes, every food type is affected – meat, poultry, fish, fruit, vegetables, cereals, grain.

Every human on earth is daily absorbing micro-doses of the most efficient growth promoter every invented. Like animals, people are getting fat. Clinically obese and on the road to diabetes, asthma, heart disease and cancer.

Result – except in the short term, antibiotics are more dangerous than life-saving. They might prevent infection for a heart transplant or a caesarean birth. But the superbugs they spawn already kill 25,000 people a year in the EU – the same as road accidents.

And with the slow death of obesity, antibiotics will kill many millions more.

Start again

All of which should say to the G20 – stop wasting time and money. Antibiotics have outlasted their usefulness, it’s time to find replacements.

Replacement bacteria-killers to protect life. Replacement hygiene methods to ensure safety. And replacement growth promoters to produce food.

They already exist.

Bacteriophages are viruses that kill bacteria. They can be specifically targeted. And they can be quickly modified, mutating just as bacteria mutate to prevent acquiring resistance.

Ionised hydrogen peroxide misting kills ALL germs, not just bacteria – viruses and fungi too. No hospital need ever again run the risk of pathogens not removed before procedures.

Probiotics and in-feed enzymes have  worked as growth promoters in Sweden and Nordic countries since 1986. Maybe not as spectacularly, but certainly successfully. And food production is a big industry, there’ll be no shortage of funds if finding better methods is in need of funding.

So come on G20, how about it?

Drop all this antibiotic stuff and let’s get back on track.

Picture Copyright: designbydx / 123RF Stock Photo

Stop germs in their tracks – tomorrow’s antibiotics may no longer save you

Hand drowning in pills
Take whatever you like – antibiotics are not working any more – you have to stop germs by yourself

It’s a hard choice if you’re lazy. Stop germs positively, or face the consequences.

Because tomorrow, antibiotics won’t work any more.

So there’s no taking chances.

No more, “I’ll be OK, the Doc can give me something to make it better.”

Because there’ll be no “something”.

The only thing between you and getting ill will be your own clean hands – and how good you are at keeping germs away from you.

Forget antibiotics.

Already bacteria have learned how to resist them. And as the oldest successful living beings on the planet, bacteria always survive.

All our own fault

Plus they’ve learned from our stupidity.

We get ill, we take antibiotics – and stop as soon as we feel better.

Not when the germs are gone – when we feel better.

So there’s a few survivors around to live another day. The strongest and the most resilient. Ready to breed another few thousand generations before next time. And at twenty minutes a generation, they’re ready before we are.

And next time, we use the left-over medicine but it’s not enough. So the bacteria don’t die, they endure. Able to outlast the next lot we throw at them. Becoming superbugs. And teaching others to become superbugs too.

Superbugs, super-dangerous, super problem

Heard of MRSA? That’s methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus. A superbug which lives naturally in your nose – but don’t get it in your bloodstream.

It’s just one of this lot – top of the World Health Organization’s hit-list of super-dangerous bad guys:

Priority 1: CRITICAL

  • Acinetobacter baumannii, carbapenem-resistant
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa, carbapenem-resistant
  • Enterobacteriaceae, carbapenem-resistant, ESBL-producing

Priority 2: HIGH

  • Enterococcus faecium, vancomycin-resistant
  • Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant, vancomycin-intermediate and resistant
  • Helicobacter pylori, clarithromycin-resistant
  • Campylobacter spp., fluoroquinolone-resistant
  • Salmonellae, fluoroquinolone-resistant
  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae, cephalosporin-resistant, fluoroquinolone-resistant

Priority 3: MEDIUM

  • Streptococcus pneumoniae, penicillin-non-susceptible
  • Haemophilus influenzae, ampicillin-resistant
  • Shigella spp., fluoroquinolone-resistant

Yeah?

You go to hospital with any of those, you might not come out again.

The drugs don’t work

Because the days of taking a cure are past – our miracle antibiotics do zip. And that’s not us saying so, it’s our top Chief Medical Officer of England, Dr Dame Sally Davies – in her book The Drugs Don’t Work – and in just about every public statement since she wrote it.

No more you get sick, you take the medicine.

Now you mustn’t get sick. Period.

If you want to live, you’ve got to be hygienic like never before. Wash your hands whenever you do anything – before and after. Keep your surroundings clean as a whistle.

And make a deliberate effort to stop germs – avoid them, prevent them, eliminate them.

Not just some of the time, but all of the time.

Because bacteria never give up – and they know we’re careless.

Of course we are, we’re roughly half bacteria ourselves. 39 trillion bacteria and 30 trillion human cells.

Which means we’ve got to stop the wrong ones getting to us and taking us down.

Hype up the hygiene

Not something you can do with a scrubbing brush and bleach. Not even lathered in carbolic every second of the day. You can’t get to all the places microscopic germs can hide – and you can’t scrub the air, which is 80% of our indoor living space.

Remember, there’s nothing between you and a noxious infection except prevention.

Which makes misting our surroundings sterile with hydrogen peroxide our best defence yet since the collapse of antibiotics.

It’s safe and non-toxic – though a little irritant to eyes and throat. And it kills ALL bacteria, viruses and fungi to a 6-Log Sterility Assurance Level  in 40 minutes or less, depending on room size.

Stop germs at work – and your colleagues are safe from each other and whatever is going around. Healthy and well, not fighting colds or tummy upsets – making money, getting on with the job.

Stop germs at school – and your kids are safe from all the bugs inevitably gathered where slap-happy hygiene puts them at risk. Did you ever know a 6-year-old who voluntarily remembered to wash their hands?

Stop germs at home – and your family is safe in the one place where they should be, a haven from outside against weather, worries and sickness.

Stop germs and live

OK, so antibiotics don’t work any more – or may not within the next few years. We have a defence and it’s highly effective – to avoid getting sick in the first place.

And there’s only one way to do that.

Stop germs.

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What if we could sue the people who make us fat?

Red card girl
It’s not your fault you’re fat, but there’s plenty you can blame

We’re not naturally fat. None of us are.

Either we have a medical condition. Or something makes us that way.

Basically eating too much. And our bodies absorbing it without need.

Except nobody is fat by choice. Going for the most fattening foods and scoffing double helpings.

Mind-controlled gluttons

Most of the time, we’re not even aware of it. Unconsciously chowing down more than we should.

Not knowingly, or of our own free will. Just driven by our bodies.

So what makes our bodies demand more than they should?

The hunger feeling is real and won’t go away – yet we’ve already had enough to satisfy us.

It’s like we’re being fattened up. Like turkeys before Christmas, fattening up for market.

There is a difference.

We’re just eating – or at least think we are.

But turkeys are deliberately dosed with growth boosters along with their feed. The same growth boosters fed to all commercial livestock – chickens, cattle, pigs, sheep, even fish. Stepped up and more concentrated over the  last twenty years. But used by livestock farmers worldwide since the early 50s.

They’re all bulked up by regular micro-doses of antibiotics.

Which means so are we. And our daily exposure to antibiotics is total – the most successful growth boosters of all time.

The real Hunger Games

Drip-drip, the ghrelin hormone that switches on our hunger is super-stimulated, permanently set to ON. At the same time, the OFF hormone leptin is over-ridden, so we never know when we’ve had enough.

On top of that, the accelerated digestion in our gut works more efficiently, extracting more nutrients than our systems are able to process, storing the excess as fat. We still excrete the extra nutrients we don’t need, but retain far more than we should.

The cows and pigs and chickens do the same. Pooing out around 80% of the food value they eat – along with traces of all the vitamin additives and medicines in their systems, including antibiotics.

Their poo becomes manure, used directly or indirectly as fertiliser to enrich the soil and stimulate plant growth. Cereal crops, grain, fruit and vegetables are all accelerated in the same way. So there’s antibiotics in them too.

As there is in the grass, mown hay and feedstuff crops fed BACK to the same animals – more antibiotics micro-doses to quicken their systems and bulk them up faster.

Which means continuous micro-doses of antibiotics in all of our own food – meat and vegetables – the most successful growth booster of al time. Constantly ingested by our bodies with every meal we eat.

Fattening up like turkeys? That’s exactly what we are.

External influences changing our bodies without our knowledge – and certainly without our permission.

The blame game

So who should we sue for being fattened against our will?

The farmers? The antibiotics manufacturing companies?

Possibly, though they’re only doing their job.  Our personal concerns are not even on their radar.

They are to our health authorities though – and they’re hardly unaware of the problem.

Not a day goes by without somebody from Public Health England or DEFRA or the Food Standards Agency voicing alarm about antibiotic resistance.

Our miracle drugs aren’t performing as well as they did because superbug bacteria are becoming immune to them. They’re learning resistance through overuse and abuse of antibiotics across the board.

Over-prescribed by doctors and used in industrial quantities by agriculture. 240,000 tonnes a year worldwide – accelerating to nearly another 70% by 2030.

Which says, yes – our health authorities KNOW about antibiotics used as growth boosters. But their focus is on the medical implications of antibiotic resistance.

Cue much hand wringing and corporate crocodile tears.

Our health authorities also KNOW we have a fat problem. From their own statistics they alert us to a growing epidemic – that two thirds of British adults are already overweight or obese, as well as one third of children.

Insider information

They also KNOW the implications of obesity. The long, slow slide towards asthma, diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Snowballing costs for the NHS accounting for 30 million deaths currently – versus just 700,000 for antibiotic resistance.

30 million deaths – half the population of the country – isn’t anybody minding the store?

And they know it’s a problem. Our Chief Medical Officer, Dame Sally Davies herself, warns that obesity is a threat as serious as terrorism.

Nice try, but not even close. According to the Global Terrorism Database, only 90 people died in terrorist attacks between 2000 and 2015.

Stack that up against the 30 million likely to die from obesity they are carrying right now.

Which gives us a lot of leeway, deciding who’s answerable.

Because though it never occurs to us, a lot of people know that antibiotics make us fat. And they can’t evade that responsibility, just like the tobacco industry can’t claim smoking is not a health risk.

Truth avoidance

The truth is that antibiotics make us fat.

Health authorities know, government knows, drug companies know and farmers know.

Just possibly supermarkets know and fast food chains as well. It’s the fashion now to claim foods are antibiotics-free.

As if.

One thing’s for certain though. We’re off the hook blaming ourselves for being fat.

We might be oversize, but this is a blame game we’re not playing.

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If sugar makes us fat, why DOESN’T it get used to bulk up farm animals?

Sugar lust
Take it from the billions of animals who know. Sugar is under-powered – to get really fat, you need antibiotics

Not good enough is why. Doesn’t do the job. If you want to bulk up proper, use antibiotics.

That’s what farmers do. Micro-doses of antibiotics in the feed – the most powerful growth boosters ever invented. To make animals WANT to eat more. And to make them absorb more food value than they normally do – which is  how they put on weight.

Super-duper growth boosters

Works great with cattle, sheep, pigs, chickens, even fish. From egg to a roasting chicken in 6 weeks. From newborn calf to an Aberdeen Angus steak in 14 months.

Overnight maturity. Instant obesity.

The same with plants. Faster seeding, stronger shooting, quicker yielding. From antibiotics applied directly, or absorbed from the soil in animal manure.

Oh sure, sugar has an effect – but mild alongside antibiotics. Feeble. The farmers’ secret to fast fat for at least the last fifty years. Exploding to industrial levels  in the last twenty – with the introduction of factory farms or Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs).

Exactly when our current obesity epidemic got started. Two thirds of British adults now overweight or obese – and one third of children too.

But not from sugar. Fifty years ago we had sugary Coke and junk-food pizza, just like we have now – and people didn’t get fat. Now they do. From the same antibiotics that the animals get fed.

How does that work?

All in the poo

That’s the messy part. Very ewey.

You see, animals don’t absorb all the food that they eat. Around 80% is pooed out again as waste, nature’s way of providing on-going fertility to plants and smaller animals like birds and insects. And not just nutrients either, but residual amounts of those antibiotics.

Some of it falls on the grass in animal grazing areas, to enrich the soil and promote healthy growth. The animals eat it, re-ingesting those same antibiotics all over again. Or they eat cereal straw and grass dried after cutting – or silage made from cereal crops like maize and wheat.

Again, grown with fertile manure from those same animals. And again with residual amounts of antibiotics – exactly like the micro-doses added to their feed in the first place.

So even if antibiotics are withdrawn from their food because they’re getting ready for market, they’re still getting their daily hit. Still with their appetites turned full throttle.

Our daily dose

And still with antibiotics in their bodies. Which become the beef, lamb, pork and poultry offerings on our supermarket shelves – ready for us to eat, antibiotics and all.

With the same effect of making US want to eat more than we usually do – and absorbing more nutrients than normal. What works for the animals works for us, so WE get fat too.

Fatter and fatter. Because we don’t go to market at an early age – we’re here for the long haul. So we pile on the pounds – meal after meal, day after day without realising it. Until suddenly we look in the mirror and we’re a hulking Size 20.

Yes, sugar has a bearing on it. We eat too much of it, of course we bulk up. Two two-litre Cokes instead of the 350ml bottle our grand-folks chugged. Double burger with extra fries – and muddy Mississippis to follow.

Too much food altogether, that’s why we get fat.

But sugar’s not the cause. Not everyone who puts two spoonfuls in their tea is a porker. Nor is everyone who chows a Mars bar dangerously overweight.

The info that we’re over the top doesn’t reach the brain because the bacteria in our gut mix up the signals. We over-eat without realising it – until reality hits us in the mirror.

So putting a tax on sugar is not exactly going to help. It’s treating symptoms, not cause.

Yes, we eat too much sugar. And too much bread, and too many chips, and too much cheese, and too many eggs, and too much jam, and too much cake, and too much ice cream, and too much curry and rice.

It’s not the sugar that’s the problem. It’s the too much.

And the only way to stop it, is to stop us getting these micro-doses of antibiotics in everything we eat. Meat, vegetables, fruit, dairy – even water. Everything is laced with them – right through the whole food production chain.

With more coming all the time. 240,000 tonnes of antibiotics currently get used worldwide in agriculture – with totals set to hike nearly 70% by 2030.

Which means it’s not sugar we have to tax, it’s antibiotics.

Not exactly wise – because without them, world food production would stall completely.

From eating and absorbing too much, billions of people would starve and wither. And there would be nobody to eat the sugar anyway.

Ever get the feeling our “experts” don’t know what they’re talking about?

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