Super hygiene stops superbugs – non-medical DIY that works

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Super hygiene to the rescue

Anxiety, panic attacks and feeling depressed can all be helped by your doctor. But how about when your doctor gets them?

Sure, there are capsules to be swallow and tablets to take. But that’s treating symptoms, not cause.

Because your doctor’s biggest concern right now is the increasing failure of antibiotics. Or more accurately, the emergence of the all-resistant superbug. If you’re unlucky enough to fall ill, those once reliable medicines are beginning not to work any more.

There’s no panic yet, because health professionals don’t work that way. Most of the hysteria is to sell newspapers. A lot of medicines still work, and doctors soldier on with their life-saving work, the way they have always.

But the clock is ticking. No less a heavy than Chief Medical Officer, Professor Dame Sally Davies points out that developing a new drug and making it safe takes up to twenty years.

Too long, isn’t it? Because people are falling ill now. And not just from diseases. From infections after injury or surgery. From that cut on your leg, shaving in the bath.

Now hold on a minute. Doctors are only treating people who are ill already. Quaint Chinese traditions aside, we can’t ALSO expect them to prevent us getting sick in the first place.

If you’re injured in a road accident, your doctor can patch you up. But it’s the work of local councils, the highways agency, police and the DVLA to keep the roads safe and ensure they don’t happen in the first place. And your own watchfulness, of course.

It’s the same with superbugs. The Doc piles into action if you come down with something. But it’s hygiene laws, sanitation procedures and your own life habits that help you avoid them. A non-medical solution.

Which makes it more a house-keeping issue than a medical one. More like Janitor versus Doctor.

You see, washing and scrubbing is often not enough against superbugs.

We need to up our daily hygiene measures – make them way more effective than they are at the moment.

Washing hands and antibiotics worked fine in the Twentieth Century. To survive in the Twenty-First, we have to do better.

And we can.

Most people don’t know it, but it’s possible to destroy pretty well all viruses and bacteria before they get to us. To sterilise the whole place so there is nothing there to threaten us.

Imagine doing that to schools and crèches. Or hotel rooms and restaurants. Or planes, ships, trains and buses. Or public places, libraries, gyms, theatres – anywhere where people congregate.

You walk in and the whole place is sterile, no germs, no nothing. You’re safe. Or more to the point, your kids are.

That doesn’t mean that little Johnny with a cold is not going to give it to someone. But it does mean there are no lingering pathogens from yesterday or last week. They’ve all been eliminated.

And just for perspective, it’s worth remembering that most viruses can survive for seven days or more – probably their entire life-cycle. Why is why, after a long weekend, an untreated classroom may not be as safe as you think it is.

No, you don’t go at these killers with bleach, scrubbing down counters and floors in a frenzy. Bleach won’t do the job and most microbes are up in the air anyway. 80% of any room is the air space we move around in, with the microbes floating round in their billions.

You got that right. Cleaning countertops, work surfaces and floors is only 20% of the job.

And at just 0.02 microns across – the size of a rhinovirus cell – microorganisms are so light, they’re always in suspension. Waiting to be breathed in or swallowed, or settle on cuts and abrasions – just because they’re in the same place at the same time.

Yes, doctors are worried. But we can do something now.

Most effective is a machine not much bigger than a vacuum cleaner that automatically mists the air in a room with hydrogen peroxide.

Doctors know about hydrogen peroxide – a tried and tested germ-fighter since the Nineteenth Century. The body manufactures it to kill germs internally. But not in quantities enough to kill superbugs.

The “mistifying” machine sprays ionised hydrogen peroxide – finer and lighter than water droplets, able to disperse upwards and outwards – even underneath things that seldom get cleaned.

The stuff destroys pathogens by shoving oxygen atoms at them. Their cell structure is ripped apart and they cannot survive. 45 minutes later, all that’s left is oxygen and the finest film of water.

And a sterilised room, of course – 99,9999% of germs dead, per clinical evaluation tests.

Count on it, as superbugs get smarter, you’re going to see a lot of these machines in the future. You may even have one at home, though they’re a bit on the expensive side at the moment – about the same as a commercial floor cleaning machine.

They’re going to be necessary. Because the bugs don’t just get smarter, they kill better. And it’s you and your loved ones they’re having a go at.

As an effective defence though, hydrogen peroxide works against even the deadliest killers. Keeping you safe by avoidance – more realistic than hoping you’ll get better once you’ve got something.

Think about it. A new level of daily hygiene. A non-medical precaution you can take now.

Not rocket science. Just super hygiene agaist superbugs.