No more stowaways – viruses and germs miss the boat

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Container ship
Sterilised before departure – another shipload of germs that aren’t coming

You’ll notice it most at the supermarket.

Bananas from Chile, lamb from New Zealand, oranges from Spain, grapes from South Africa – an amazing amount of stuff from overseas.

All shipped in by container, those big 20-foot jobbies you see thundering down the M25. Every day, thousands and thousands of them – stuff to keep us going.

Unwanted passengers too.

Every once in a while there’s a lizard or a tarantula in someone’s shopping. Slightly hazardous to your health.

Unseen passengers too. More dangerous because there’s more of them. Billions and billions of microscopic viruses or bacteria. Often dread diseases waiting for a chance.

But not always.

Most containers get hosed out when they’re unloaded. Gunk and dirt taken out to make sure they’re clean. Good practice, but not good enough. Not these days.

Because germs just love damp places to hide and breed. Especially in warm countries, baked by the sun. In empty containers waiting for a load.

That’s if they get the chance.

More and more shippers choose to sterilise their containers before they’re loaded.

Sometimes with dry ice, sometimes with ozone, some even try super-heated steam.

Most effective is hydrogen peroxide. Sprayed in as a micro-mist finer than water, ionised so it disperses and spreads into every little crevice. In mid-air or on every surface, it finds and clings to harmful pathogens, forcing oxygen atoms at them.

No virus or bacteria can survive being oxidised. Its whole cell structure is ripped to shreds. There’s no smell or odour either – permanently gone.

And to make doubly sure, the hydrogen peroxide is boosted with of colloidal silver, renowned for its germ-killing since the Nineteenth Century. In 40 minutes, that container it totally sterile. Safe and good to go for its journey to your supermarket depot.

Nothing but air and moisture – because when hydrogen peroxide has done its work, it decomposes to oxygen and water. So if there are any unintended passengers – a ladybird on your roses from Kenya – they’re in the boxes from the grower, not anywhere else.

Kind of reassuring isn’t it?

Millions of containers travelling the world for you – and you stay protected.

So when your ship comes in, you know you’re safe.