Germ-killers aren’t supposed to kill us too

Share this with the world
Rush to AandE
Bleach kills germs, but has serious consequences

We’re weird, and getting weirder.

Like, have you ever wondered where we get our masochistic Nineteenth Century convictions about keeping healthy?

Actually, it’s more about the things we use to KEEP us healthy.

Do we really want things to be like this?

Medical mindset

Antiseptics have to sting, medicines  have to taste awful, and disinfectants have to smell so strong they take the roof of your head off.

True isn’t it, that if your tummy medicine doesn’t taste like the end of the world, you KNOW it’s not going to work?

Except that maybe, just maybe, the doctors are coming round to thinking otherwise.

Because buried deep in a recent issue of Occupational & Environmental Medicine is a report about the use of bleach as a disinfectant and the potentially harmful effects it has on children.

Well, hello reality.

Super-toxic

How many of us remember school rooms ponging to high heaven – so strong we got headaches, felt dizzy and please Miss, I don’t feel very well before rushing outside to throw up?

Seems that from way back, our phobia to get rid of germs has driven us to use some pretty toxic preparations – they kill germs, yes – but they do a pretty good number on us too.

Bleach and carbolic  – has your body ever suffered anything quite as noxious in the name of good health? Sure, there’s no germs in the place, but the air is not breathable either.

So it comes as no surprise that the learned O&EM report links bleach with respiratory problems among kids – specifically influenza, tonsillitis, sinusitis, otitis, bronchitis and pneumonia.

In homes and schools where bleach is regularly used, all of these conditions are all too common – even the risk of re-infection is 18% higher too.

Are we mad or what?

The killer germ-killer

Once upon a time the king germ-killer of choice used to be formaldehyde. Effective certainly, but fatal if ingested, highly irritable to the skin and breathing airways, and linked repeatedly to cancer.

This stuff is so toxic it’s now banned pretty well world-wide for general use – and treated as highly hazardous by industry.

Check the side effects of bleach and they’re pretty much the same, yet still we keep using it as a frontline defence. And have you seen what it does to plastics and lots of other materials?

Do we really want our kids’ insides to suffer like that?

Plus it’s difficult and unpleasant to use too. Rubber gloves and face mask.

And even then, it’s only effective as a wipe-down disinfectant. It doesn’t kill all germs, only some – and despite the fumes, does nothing to clobber pathogens floating around in the air – which let’s face it, is 80% of the indoor space around us.

Yes, we’re masochistic.

So here is this clumsy, toxic, evil-smelling stuff that doesn’t exactly do all the things it’s supposed to and we keep on using it.

The safe steriliser

When all the time there’s another Nineteenth Century germ-killer that is so completely safe to use, our own bodies manufacture the stuff to defend against infections – which kills ALL viruses and bacteria – and which leaves no trace of itself after use, the whole place is odour-free and sterile.

Yup, it’s our good friend hydrogen peroxide – the same teeth-whitening, disinfecting and colour-bleaching secret of “bottle blondes” that you can buy over the counter at Boots or Superdrug.

But with a difference.

Souped up in a Hypersteriliser, it ionises to work as a plasma, actively spreading everywhere as a super-fine mist – pushed hard against walls, ceilings, floors, furniture and underneath things too, even deep into cracks and crevices – actively snatching at viruses and bacteria to rip them apart by oxidising them.

And when it’s all over, it reverts back to oxygen and water, which immediately evaporates to nothing. No coughs, no colds, not even a mild twinge of headache. Slightly less hazardous than the other things we try – which could be more closely related to paint-stripper.

Yes, germs are dangerous and need drastic action.

But we don’t have to kill our kids for it. (Tweet this)