Covid-19 panic, or dying of flu?

Surprised girl in mask
No, it’s not Ebola. But it could still kill you.

Our neighbour has Covid-19. Dinkum. All the symptoms – dry cough, bloodshot eyes, fever, chest pains, loss of appetite. She sends her apologies that we’re all going to die.

Or not.

Coronavirus Obsession

Because whatever symptoms are going, she’s always got them.

Which describes far too many of us. Too ready to panic and assume the worst. Too obsessed with the exotic to recognise the every day.

Yes, It’s the Flu

You see, these symptoms are shared not only with Covid-19- but common or garden flu. Not even the imported variety like Spanish or Hong Kong – just plain old ordinary flu. With all the usual aches and pains and sniffles – we really should know better.

But familiarity breeds contempt right?

At least if we really thought it was Covid-19, we might show some sense. Like stay in bed, out of circulation, and call for the Doc.

Coughs and Sneezes

Instead of toughing it out because it’s only flu – exploding with coughs and sneezes all over everybody in the Underground – and that unsympathetic bunch at the office.

More fool us, actually. Because “it’s only flu” is a dangerous attitude to have. It’s not sexy, like Covid-19. But it still kills. In fact, throughout history, flu has probably killed more people than any other single affliction.

Yes, “it’s only flu” – and YOU COULD DIE.

The Winter Killer

Ever wondered why the government makes such a hoo-hah of flu jabs for the Over-65s? They’re seriously at risk – not just with advancing age – but with the growing list that all of us have of ailments acquired through the years.

Laugh it off if you dare.

If you sit with any of the “indulgence disorders” – COPD from smoking, liver problems from drinking, or any other underlying medical condition – a touch of flu could be the end of you.

Better get that sore throat, headache and constant fatigue seen to – before it escalates into something else. It doesn’t have to be full-blown pneumonia, you can peg off from flu just like that.

Reality Check

Time to wake up.

It’s not Covid-19. It’s flu, it’s here – and you’re going down, if you don’t wise up.

Last year the Office of National Statistics put Excess Winter Deaths at 31,100 – a large chunk of them from flu.  That’s right up there with Covid-19 figures – and it happens every year!

And another thing about flu. It lingers in the air. Circulates through air conditioning ducts.

Better do something about your daily hygiene. Because washing your hands and scrubbing down surfaces won’t help if you breathe it in.

Personal Protection

Start with something like Dettol – the aerosol disinfectant kills 99.9% of viruses and bacteria including flu – a Sterility Assurance Level of Log 3.

Or if Covid-19-panic has really got to you, use hydrogen peroxide. The auto-robot thingy they use in hospitals and offices sends out an ionised spray that sterilises the whole place – 99,9999% of viruses and bacteria eliminated – a Sterility Assurance Level of Log 6.

By the way, it kills Covid-19 too. Oxidises it to pieces. So that sniffle is not what you think it is.

Bless you!

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 13 July 2018 @ 11:45 pm

Originally posted on 13 July 2018 @ 11:45 pm

How Ebola could double your airfare

Aircraft at gate
Twenty minutes to sterilise a whole plane? And 99.9999% germ-free too.

An aircraft sits on the ground – quarantined for suspected Ebola. No confirmation or anything, a passenger just threw up on the flight.

Air sickness? Rich food? Nervous tension? Or good old norovirus?

Nobody’s taking any chances. So passengers sit to have their symptoms checked.

Time is money

And the meter is running – landing fees, apron fees, security, ground staff support, aircraft servicing, facilities supply, passengers transfers, aircraft valeting, sanitation.

At Heathrow, it could cost over £20,000 just to land. Once down, just sitting parked is around £200 an hour. None of the other fees are cheap either. You wouldn’t want them to be. Passenger safety and security is much too important.

It may be slightly cheaper at Madrid’s  Barajas airport. Where an Air France Airbus A320 landed on Thursday to be be immediately quarantined – because a passenger from Lagos was on board who displayed signs of the Ebola virus.

After getting the passengers off, a statement  by Air France said the return flight was cancelled and the aircraft would be disinfected. More time, more money.

And it’s starting to happen more and more.

Everyone in a tizz

Like Flight 1143, another Airbus A320, the Frontier Airlines aircraft on which Ebola victim Amber Vinson flew from Cleveland to Dallas on 13th October.

This one has the Americans in a total tizz. It’s been returned to service, cleaned several times following the Centers for Disease Control guidelines which themselves are vague, and now sits grounded in Cleveland – presumably awaiting major decontamination.

The same hesitation is all over – aircraft quarantined and then grounded. Emirates Flight 237 from Dubai to Boston on Monday. The KLM flight to Amsterdam from Glasgow three days ago. Another KLM flight from Amsterdam to Værnes in Norway back in August. The Gambia Bird flight from Freetown to Gatwick via Banjul the week before.

A lengthy process

It takes time to decontaminate an aircraft. And it’s a messy business. Recommended by the World Health Organisation, the preferred procedure after thorough cleaning is to seal the aircraft and admit carboxide gas – a mixture of 10% ethylene oxide and 90% carbon dioxide – pumped in under pressure and maintained at a constant temperature for 6-12 hours.

A second method involves ethylene oxide and Freon II for a similar period. Or introducing betapropiolactone in vapour form for two hours – which must be 98% pure, or it causes a sticky polymer to form on all surfaces.

But it has to be done. Though the Ebola virus can exist outside the body for only a short time, its incubation period is 21 days. During which time how many passengers came on board and what did they touch?

Do the math. Schedule an increasing number of planes through the process as Ebola cases multiply – and sooner or later, it’s going to hit your credit card.

The Nigerian alternative

Unless of course, the airlines choose to use hydrogen peroxide. Twenty minutes per aircraft and all viruses and bacteria that may have been on board are gone – a reduction of 99,9999%.

The same stuff is already being used to combat Ebola in Africa. Already more than 100 super-misting machines have been sent to Nigeria, the only country which can claim to have brought the outbreak under control.

Let’s hope the airlines are watching – before our fares go through the roof.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 12 July 2018 @ 11:23 pm

Originally posted on 12 July 2018 @ 11:23 pm

SWAT teams for Ebola as world markets catch a cold

SWAT Team Assault
High-risk bugs like Ebola stand everyday hygiene on its head

America has hit the panic button with Ebola.

Last night President Obama directed the US Center for Disease Control to send out rapid response SWAT teams to any hospital reporting patients displaying signs of the virus within 24 hours.

Taking chances

The entire system is clearly in a scramble as pictures emerge of an unidentified man with a clipboard fussing round Ebola victim Amber Vinson on her way to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.

His only protection against Ebola? He’s out there in shirt-sleeves.

World-wide wheelspin

Such wheelspin and confusion quickly hit international markets, already reeling from pension fund and other losses . The Dow Jones fell 1.64% to 16047.88 – accelerated by a CDC statement that it was not clear how Miss Vinson had contracted Ebola.

Watch the panic snowball. Alongside Ebola, it’s the start of flu season. Up to 20% of Americans are likely to be affected, with as many as 200,000 needing hospital treatment.

Atishoo!

And here’s the scary bit. In the first week, flu symptoms are similar to Ebola’s – fever and fatigue. Already monitored at major airports, if too many sneezes happen on transcontinental flights over the next few months, the health system could go into meltdown.

But that’s just part of it. Already the World Health Organisation put the possible death toll from Ebola at 10,000 by December. Over-reacting politicians are contributing to international dread.

Over-reacting?

Lost in today’s Ebola-surge is a side report from Ghana, neighbour to the Ivory Coast which suffered an Ebola outbreak in 1994. Eight students at the Atebubu Teachers College of Education in the Brong Ahafo have died of cholera.

And cholera is way more scary.

First, it kills within hours, not weeks. Second, it’s highly contagious. According to the World Health Organisation, there are up to 5 million cases and 120,000 deaths every year.

The upside

The difference is that it’s treatable.

But so is Ebola BEFORE it infects anyone.

Like most viruses and bacteria – cholera too – Ebola is defenceless against being oxidised. Health authorities may be swamped handling existing cases – but they can prevent more by sterilising treatment areas with hydrogen peroxide or other oxidisers before patients are admitted.

It won’t cure the patients. But it will raise the resistance threshold for medics, care workers and support staff already risking their lives.

Safer at home

It will do the same thing too at your local supermarket, eliminating germs and odours.

Except that according to President Obama, the likelihood of a widespread Ebola outbreak is “very, very low.” So don’t expect your local Tesco to go spraying the place just yet.

Better go with the paracetamol then. And hope that an effective wide-scale treatment for Ebola can be found soon.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 11 July 2018 @ 11:10 pm

Originally posted on 11 July 2018 @ 11:10 pm

How Ebola could save your life

Operating theatre
Why die, when you don’t need to?

It’s the panic of the moment – and that’s why.

For the first time in forever, people are concerned about their level of daily hygiene. And they’re right to be scared.

There’s a huge difference between the daily shower and brushing your teeth to the full-body bio-hazard protection suits worn by Ebola care-medicos.

It is a good parallel though. Day-to-day, we go through life without any protection – constantly surrounded by billions of microbes, many as deadly as Ebola.

A recent BBC report cites “The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the world’s deadliest to date.”  Deadliest among Ebola outbreaks, that is.

Not a new disease

There were others: in 1976 (Sudan, Zaire and 1 isolated case in UK), 1977 (Zaire), 1979 (Sudan), 1989 (Philippines), 1990 (USA – 4 cases caught from monkeys in quarantine), 1994 (Gabon and Ivory Coast), 1995 (Zaire),1996 (Gabon and South Africa), 1997 (Gabon), 2000 (Uganda), 2001 (Gabon and Congo Republic), 2002 (Congo Republic,  2003 (Congo Republic), 2004 (Sudan and 1 case in Russia from laboratory contamination), 2007 Congo Republic, 2008 (Uganda and Philippines), 2009 (Congo Republic), 2012 (Uganda and Congo Republic), 2013 (current outbreak – Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal, United States and Spain).

But Ebola is by no means the deadliest. In the Fourteenth Century, mortality from The Plague was 95%. In the Twentieth, 300 million people died from smallpox. Every year, 100,000 people die from cholera. Anthrax, once inhaled kills 93% of victims. HIV/AIDS kills 80% and upwards if untreated. There are plenty of others. Spanish Flu, for instance, which killed 50 million people at the end of World War One.

And that’s why people are scared.

With so many dread diseases out there, what protection do we have?

The body at risk

Against direct contact, not a lot – physical touching, exposure to body fluids, contamination from coughing and sneezing, an open wound. Once any germ gets INSIDE the body, you are at risk. Which means care and consideration in our relationships with others never goes away.

But look at the Ebola protection suits. They’re out of body protection – admittedly against extremes.

Out of body protection

Day-to-day it’s a lot easier. Because on top of all the cleaning and janitorial we routinely do, there are varying degrees of sanitising and sterilising we can apply.

Most of us use disinfectants or have them handy in the event of hazard. Bleaching agents are also a tried and tested way of getting rid of germs. Unfortunately they only work on surfaces.
Because slowly but surely, the world is waking up to the reality that ALL Infection can be airborne.

But we’re not dead yet.

There’s a whole stack of ways to clobber pathogens in the air – viruses and bacteria both, including Ebola. All of which destroy their actual cell structures so they cannot survive.

Our pathogen defence weapons

Most effective of these is undoubtedly ozone, which kills by oxidising – shoving oxygen atoms at the microorganism and ripping their cells to shreds.

The downside is, it’s too powerful. Though it’s like oxygen with one extra atom, ozone is poisonous. It kills germs, yes. It also kills people. Which means wherever it is used, the place has to be evacuated first.

That is of course, ozone in its natural concentration. In milder doses, it’s used extensively as a kind of room freshener, particularly effective at getting rid of odours – which are in turn caused by germs. An effective defence against sick building syndrome and keeping infections at bay in old age homes.

Hydrogen peroxide is another effective oxidiser. It sterilises an average room in as little as twenty minutes. And as reported extensively in the fight against Ebola, ultraviolet generators are in increasing use, particularly in American hospitals.

We’re not yet at the stage where every home has an oxidiser. But it’s coming. Expect to see all of these defences in increasing use in the near future – in hospitals, schools, hotels, restaurants, public transport – everywhere the people come together in large groups.

Ebola is dangerous. It’s also a life-saving wake-up call – to do something about our hygiene defences.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 10 July 2018 @ 10:20 pm

Originally posted on 10 July 2018 @ 10:20 pm

Help, my love-life is killing me!

Lovers breakupTruer than you know.

Ask any teenager. The angst, the gut-wrenching roller-coaster as moods switch, anxieties kick in and self-esteem goes through the floorboards.

Any idea what that does to your body system?

Read the signs – accelerated pulse, irregular breathing, acid stomach, deprived or reduced sleep.

Yeah, OK – we all know the score.

But the symptoms are real. The body’s equilibrium is out of balance and the whole metabolism is at hazard.

Why? Because the threshold is down – the ability to resist viruses and bacteria. The resilience to do things. The strength to stand up to the world. Emotional meltdown.

Perfect for germs to attack – and they do.

Look no further than your nearest TV soap. Just about every love story recognises that downcast lovers can sicken and die.

But they don’t die of love. They die of flu, or gastro, or some usually harmless nuisance bug. Struck down by their own defencelessness.

Young, strong, fully able-bodied – that’s why such losses are a tragedy.

Because once you get beyond say 25 or 30, none of that applies any more. You’re no longer a spring chicken. Injuries or accidents have left their mark. Breathing in all those fumes at work hasn’t helped either.

As your Doc might say, you have “an underlying medical condition.”

IOW – a germ entry-point.

And pretty well all of us have weaknesses of some kind or other. Yet we rattle around happily through life – unaware of the billions and billions of germs that always surround us – that are always ready for the opportunity to invade and damage us.

Yeah, maybe we wash our hands now and then – never as often as we should. And of course we try to keep our surroundings  clean and fresh – wiping and vacuuming, with the occasional scrub.

Yet in the air around us – dragging it around, kind of like our own personal bio-aura – there might be as many as 3.5 million viruses and bacteria to every cubic metre.

Which means if you’re average height – say 1.7 metres – you could be surrounded by upwards of 30 million germs. And that’s just you, by yourself.

Slightly different out in public. Like in the Underground during the rush hour, stuck between stations. Three hundred people in a carriage. Is it any wonder that our “underlying medical condition” makes us want to pull a sickie?

So where is our body armour, our force-field, our invisible barrier against these bio-attacks? Is it just the body’s natural immune threshold and that’s it?

Ulp!

Actually there is a defence – and a mighty good one too.

To sterilise the air around us and everything it touches. Oxidise all viruses and bacteria into oblivion before they can get to us.

Ozone will do it. So will hydrogen peroxide. Ammonium chloride. And a very few of those cleaners and bleaches that work by releasing oxygen.

But walk into a room after one of these things has been in action and the place can be pretty well sterile. Down to three germs per million air particles in a hospital operating room. Or in your own office if you like. Ten minutes misting up the place should do it fine.

Not quite so easy to fall in love with, of course.

But it’s reassuring to know you won’t die.

Originally posted on 8 July 2018 @ 9:11 pm

It’s not the size of bacteria that matters. It’s the size of the challenge.

Cleaning team
Yes, but will this clobber the germs?

Just to turn your mind upside down, in the microworld of bacteria and viruses, size is irrelevant.

The staggering thing is the numbers.

Billions and billions of these things are all over us, all the time, so when are we going to take them seriously?

For a truly mind-numbing perspective, take a look at the animation at Cells Alive. It’s a simple depiction of how many microorganisms can fit on the head of a pin – a space that they calculate as being just 2mm in diameter.

Get right down to ten thousand times magnification and the place is teeming with E. coli, Staphyococcus, Ebola virus and the diminutive Rhinovirus – as an image enlarged a million times, not much more than the ball of your thumb, just 0.02 microns.

All of them deadly, and all of them so small that they’re easily missed – even by the strictest disinfecting procedure. If your cleaning cloth was just another 5mm to the left…

For an even more sobering comparison, take a look at Engineering Toolbox’s table of particle sizes, and the summary of how they behave.

Now imagine, at that size, how sensitive they are to air movement, like the almost nothing whisper of your hand dropping by your side.

Yes, you’re right. It means that basically they’re ALL airborne and move around with ease, taking maybe years to settle – and sometimes never settling at all.

They’re in the air!

Yet just about every cleaning procedure we follow is cleaning hands, clothing, surfaces, floors… What about the space around us that doesn’t get touched? The moving space? The headroom? The air?

No wonder those nasties like MRSA and Legionnaire’s disease spread so easily. Even with meticulous hygiene, there’s nothing to stop them.

Nothing conventional, that is.

Which is why we keep banging the drum for total room sterilising with hydrogen peroxide. You can’t scrub air – and even if you could, a sponge and water wouldn’t crack it. You’ve got to kill the germs, not give them a bath.

A mega-challenge, yes. But one you can meet in just 45 minutes at a cost of around 80p for an average-sized room. And at that rate, less than you might spend on mop and bucket doing a supermarket or commercial kitchen.

And if it’s that easy, why do we ever allow ourselves to fall sick again?

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi. Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead. The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 26 June 2018 @ 5:12 pm

Originally posted on 26 June 2018 @ 5:12 pm

Don’t run to the Doc because you’re sick – you’re more than likely the cause

Operating theatre

Why catch a germ, when you can avoid it?

We really are chancers, every single one of us.

Not always knowingly – in fact often with the best of intentions.

But every day we take chances that are so deadly, we’re lucky to be alive.

Ah yes, says the Hand Hygiene brigade, we know.

People are in a hurry, they either forget to wash their hands, or mean to do it later – or simply wing it, hoping nobody will notice.

And because the human body is so amazingly resilient, 9 times out of 10 they get away with it.

Day to day we don’t get tummy bugs, or colds and flu, or something way more serious. Because even if we do there’s usually a pill for it. Slurp, swallow, sorted.

Recognise ourselves?

Here be beasties

Yet all the time we know there’s monsters – e. coli, MRSA, campylobacter, salmonella or norovirus, just waiting to grab us. Not to mention TB, yellow fever, ebola, polio or any of the other heavyweights. All floating in the air, waiting for their moment. Covid-19, for instance, the lethal newcomer.

And any one of them can take us down, clean hands or not. You might scrub your nails, but then you touch your hair, or simply take a breath and – whoops!

But come on, this is the Twenty-First Century, we don’t have to live like that.

If it’s too hot, we have central heating – too cold, air conditioning.

Beastie protection

And because it’s so germy, we have total room sterilisers too.

Yes, we do, all ready to go right now, but nobody thinks about them. Why? Well they didn’t even remember their hands, did they?

Actually they’re pretty smart – and effective, these germ-killing auto-robots. Before you go into a room, they can eliminate every known bacteria or virus there is by oxidising it to nothing. With a supermist of hydrogen peroxide that gets in everywhere.

You might have germs on your hands or in your clothing. You might waft in with a whole stack more all clouded around you. But there’s nothing lurking waiting for you, not a thing.

Not in the air, underneath anything, or hiding in the cracks.

Unless you’ve been careless beforehand, you’re safe.

So are your kids, or anyone else who uses the same room. Free from germs, all OK.

Makes you think, doesn’t it?

If germs can be zapped outright, why so iffy wherever you go?

Why aren’t these things in hospitals, schools, hotels, restaurants – everywhere? Why are people still getting sick?

Risk-takers all

Because we’re all chancers is why. It can’t happen to me.

Oh yes, it can. And if you’ve been watching the news lately, you’ll know it will.

Because all those pills we’ve been taking for when we chance it? The bugs we take them for are becoming immune. Resistant to antibiotics. Our miracle cures are beginning not to work any more.

Eek.

Best not to take chances at all. Eliminate germs, everybody wins.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 24 June 2018 @ 4:08 am

Originally posted on 24 June 2018 @ 4:08 am

Time to kick up stink about germ protection

Girl holding nose
There’s something rotten about our hygiene

What’s with the big shots who run this world?

People still catch germs, people still die – but we can stop viruses and bacteria any time we like, just by pressing a button.

It’s shocking, but it’s true.

Any germ you like, we can kill it dead, before it starts anything, right now.

So why are people falling ill and catching infections, when it’s all preventable?

Inertia.

Do nothing syndrome

It’s easier to do nothing. And save the money.

There’s no crisis to worry about, so why bother?

Unless you happen to be one of those with MRSA, e. coli, aspergillis, c. difficile, campylobacter, HIV-AIDS, or any of the other nasties that can kill you.

Because the cruel truth is, you didn’t need to be exposed to any of them in the first place.

Sure, medical science can do amazing things to help when you’re ill. But how many wash their hands of proactively staying healthy? Of preventing infections before they start?

Easy does it

It’s not difficult to sterilise the space around us. To kill all the germs and make sure it’s safe to be there. We’ve known how to do it since the Nineteenth Century.

The cheapest and easiest is to oxidise them. Out in the open, before they invade your body, viruses and bacteria are unprotected. Shove extra atoms of oxygen at them, and you rip their cell structure to pieces. They’re gone, permanently.

And with an oxidiser like ionised hydrogen peroxide, you can mist-spray a whole room to sterilise the moving space and all surfaces – tables, chairs, worktops, beds and floors – for around 80p. Not exactly buying an aircraft carrier, is it?

Or if you really want to blast germs out of existence, use ozone.

It works the same way, but is even more oxygen rich. Which gives you any level from simply removing smells and odours, to the industrial strength triple whammy that purifies chemical pollutants after shale oil fracking.

Too chemical for you?

Or, Plan B

Against viruses and bacteria, we even have a death ray – ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet Germicidal Irradiation (UVGI) it’s called in the trade. Five to ten minutes direct exposure and germs are history, their DNA twisted and reduced to nothing.

So why aren’t we using all these things? In hospitals, in restaurants, in foodstores, in schools, or even in our own homes? Do we have a death wish?

Because without them, we’re at risk every second of the day. Billions and billions of microbes surround every one of us all the time, yet we’re so full of ourselves we do nothing.

And all the while, doctors are going nuts because they know that antibiotics are starting not to work any more. The germs have found a way round them. They’ve developed a resistance. We’re back to the Dark Ages.

And you’d better believe it. Cut yourself making a sandwich and infection could kill you.

Except it’s totally unnecessary.

Let’s go, let’s go

Where’s the sense in dying for a BLT?

Come on now, we’ve all grown up, haven’t we? We clean our teeth, use deodorant, and wash our hands before and after we do everything. Stay healthy, that’s all we have to do.

Dammit, why shouldn’t we make a noise until every public place is properly protected in the same way it is cleaned every day? And public transport too – buses, trains, planes, ships – everywhere.

Make a stink, write to your MP.

Give those germs the same stinking treatment they give you.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

Coming home with bugs

Jetliner descending
Home, safe from germs – or caught a bug?

The euphoria is total, the excitement unbelievable. But now that Lockdown 1.0 is over, we’ve got to get back to reality.

We’ve got to get home too – which can cause a lot of us plenty of adventures.

For instance, if you flew to Uruguay as well as Brazil, you would have been sprayed with insecticide on descent into Montevideo. The airlines call this “disinsection” (dis-insect-ing) and you’ll experience it entering various countries, especially the tropical ones.

That’s fine for killing ordinary bugs, but what about the kind you can’t see? Not just Covid-19, but the more virulent viruses and bacteria that all hot countries seem to have, often contagious and capable of making you quite ill.

Believe it ot not, there is no spray treatment or procedure anywhere. You’ve got to have your shots before you go – and that’s it.

So if you’ve got a bug – or are sitting next to somebody with one – you, and everyone else on your flight could be at risk.

Somehow we’ve all experienced it, haven’t we? “Aeroplane flu” is a fact of life. And it’s almost impossible to prevent. What are they going to do, refuse everyone with a sniffle who tries to board?

It’s a problem and no mistake. All kinds of people could unknowingly carry bugs – and at 600 mph, it’s the fastest way for any new disease to spread itself around the planet.

Six countries currently require pesticide spraying on all inbound flights: Grenada, India, Kiribati, Madagascar, Trinidad and Tobago and Uruguay.

Another six; Australia, Barbados, Fiji, Jamaica, New Zealand and Panama require the use of residual pesticides – when every surface in the cabin is sprayed with a solution of 2% permethrin shortly before crew and passengers board.

But there’s nothing to stop germs. No spray, no anything to prevent the spread of the usual Brazilian villains – malaria, dengue, yellow fever, hepatitis A, typhoid, hepatitis B, and rabies. Or the more usual travel bug and everyone’s least favourite, norovirus.

It’s up to the airlines to decide what action to take. And because it takes time and money, the issue tends to be ignored. Even our own CAA are not too concerned. Yet every five years or so there is a global outbreak of something – and it’s jet travel that spreads it faster than anything else.

What can be done? Not much, if passengers are already carrying a disease or infection – and may not even know that they are.

But the issue can be minimised. Aircraft can be sterilised before every flight, so that at least cabins themselves are not the source of anything.

It may not happen very often at the moment.

But count on it, as we become more susceptible to bugs from elsewhere – particularly those that have developed resistance to antibiotics – it is likely to become the norm.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

Our blundering obesity crisis: why junk food & sugary drinks were NEVER the cause

Dont take my Coke
Obesity, what obesity? We never used to be fat in the Fifties – what’s everyone talking about?

So what is this junk food stuff, exactly?

Unhealthy? Bad for you?

Gives you high blood pressure? Makes you swell up and burst?

A McDonalds McDouble, for instance.

If it’s so bad, how come it’s been called ‘the cheapest, most nutritious and bountiful food that has ever existed in human history’?

The good bad stuff

Wow, that’s seriously bad.

Bad because it’s good. So good that the McDonalds people force you at gunpoint to have two at once. And if you don’t eat them, you die of lead poisoning.

Eating two of course, is more than your body needs. Keep going like that and no wonder we’re all fat like two-thirds of us are.

Which is the reality of course.

It’s not “junk food” that makes us fat. It’s eating too much of the stuff.

Too much of those cheap , nutrition-rich, hunger-busting fast foods that are everybody’s on-the-go favourite. Grab ’em and eat ’em, just as you like – burgers, hot dogs, fish & chips, pizza, kebabs, sliders, sandwiches – they all fill you up in minutes.

Same thing with Coke. Buy two, or the Coca-Cola people will chase you down the street with a knife. Make that the two-litre bottle, they’re not playing around. And drinking that much in one go will make you fat too.

And there’s the proof, see? That junk food will be the death of us. At least so says the latest report by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Child Health.

Nice try, but not true.

Overeating compulsion

If it were, we’d have all been fat decades ago. From 1940, when the first McDonalds opened. Or 1892, when Coca-Cola started.

Sure, there were fat people around then, but not like there are now. Back in those days, most of us were slim. Thin as a rake, and pretty with it.

Same thing in the 50s. And the 60’s. The 70s, the 80’s and even the 90’s.

We ate fast food in those days too. And drank Coke. Yet somehow we never got fat. The typical British male was just over 5ft 7in tall, weighed 11st 6lbs, had a chest of 37 inches, a waist of 34 inches, wore size seven shoes and had a collar size of 14.

Sound fat to you?

Yes, we guzzled the stuff and enjoyed it. But never too much, like we do now.

So what’s different? What’s the CAUSE? What’s suddenly making us eat too much in the last twenty years?

“Ooh , er… lifestyle” say the medics, clutching at straws.

What, we didn’t have telly in those days? No Corrie, no Fawlty Towers, no Dr Who, no Steptoe?

And we didn’t have computers? No Atari, no Amstrad, no Apple, no Commodore Vic?

Alongside McDonalds and Coke and all the others of course?

Either that’s porkies, or the wrong end of the stick.

And since the Royal College would NEVER be anything but upright and honest, it has to be the stick thing.

So what’s happened in the last twenty years to make us eat too much now?

The awful answer

Ask the medics, because they already know the answer. They just don’t want to face the consequences of living with it.

There’s a whole INDUSTRY of making bodies eat too much. It’s worldwide too, in every modern country.

It’s called growth promoting, and it’s used in food production everywhere you can think of.

It started slow at first, a side effect of the miracle breakthrough of the Twentieth Century, antibiotics. Researchers found that small doses, fed regularly to livestock, caused them to bulk up and develop at lightning speed compared to ordinary farm animals.

Bingo!

Scientists weren’t sure WHY it happened, they only knew it did. Something that accelerated the body’s “I’m hungry” ghrelin hormone and suppressed the “I’ve had enough” leptin one.

Farmers couldn’t believe their luck. And with world population rocketing from 2½ billion back in the 50s to the 7½ billion we are now, they didn’t hang about. All those people needed feeding, and how. Boom time!

Growth boosters worldwide

OK, it took a while to get organised. Farms were small in the 50s, family-run businesses, unchanged for generations. Big money changed all that. First, broiler houses for chickens, factory farms on an industrial scale – and latest, the big-bucks CAFOs, Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations.

ALL of them shovelling in antibiotics like it was going out of fashion. 240,000 tonnes of them every year, worldwide. Poultry, cattle, sheep, pigs, fish – everything. Plant crops and vegetables too. Fertilised by manure from those same animals.

Growth boosters, get it? Ghrelin ON, leptin OFF. Eat, eat, eat, stop messing about.

So guess what? Just about every food type in your supermarket became laced through with the most successful growth booster ever invented. And we gobble them, mini-dose by mini-dose with every mouthful. Turning on our own ghrelin and turning off our own leptin.

Eat, eat and overeat – because our bodies HAVE too. The junk food myth.

Which means a fat lot of good sugar tax and banning fast food adverts in TV is going to achieve. Like tax on cigarettes never stopped smokers – and tax on alcohol never stopped boozers – us fatties are going to keep munching anyway, no matter how hard the Royal College try to stop us.

Not that they will. Their view on antibiotics is firmly fixed in another direction – antimicrobial resistance. Because of overuse and abuse of antibiotics for anything and everything, bacteria are increasingly becoming immune to our miracle life-savers.

Which puts modern medicine in total jeopardy. Just about every major medical procedure is rapidly becoming impossible because the antibiotics don’t work. No less a person than Dr Dame Sally Davies,* England’s Chief Medical Officer, has voiced that we are poised at a new Dark Ages.

Antibiotics resistance

No more heart transplants, hip replacements or caesarean births – in our lifetime we could any of us die from a paper cut.

None of which helps obesity – which is its own road to a slow and unpleasant death. Asthma, limb amputations, heart disease and cancer are all waiting in follow-up. And two-thirds of us are already on the way.

Yes, we can give up antibiotics. Stop eating the foods that contain them, like the all-natural, organic brigade. Not just the junk food but everything. Expensive – but doable.

But then we’ll need to up our game on hygiene. Because the only way to stay healthy will be to avoid germs altogether. Wash hands all the time, sterilise everything – stay out of trouble before it starts. Doable – and NOT expensive. We just need to overcome our laziness.

There’s only one problem. There’s 5 billion more of us than there were back in the 50s. We still need the 19 billion chickens, 1.4 billion cattle, 1 billion pigs and 1 billion sheep that currently feed us – and the antibiotics that keep them alive as well as fatten them. Forced production farming is so intensive, animals live on top of each other in appalling hygiene conditions.

Nope, we can’t all eat organic. There’s not enough land or produce to sustain us.

Our glorious end

Maybe all those big mouth politicians with their nuclear button-pressing threats have the answer. One press and foops! We don’t have to worry any more.

What was that Peter Sellers movie? Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. Appropriately, to quote Col. Bat Guano: “You’re gonna have to answer to the Coca-Cola company.”

* Note: Professor Dame Sally Davies was England’s Chief Medical Officer from June 2010 to September 2019. As of October 2019, the current Chief Medical Officer is Professor Chris Whitty.

About this blog

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 23 January 2018 @ 6:06 pm