NHS fat-cats make us all sick as dogs

Fist of money

No wonder you’re not well, this disease is contagious

In the euphoria of the festive season, you might have missed it.

A telling report that the number of NHS managers earning more than £300,000 a year has doubled, with some pulling down a whopping £620,000.

Obscene amounts of money

Frankly, the idea that ANYONE earns more than a tenth of that is pretty disgusting. And yes, that includes the Prime Minister at £142,500.

Because none of these are your rank-and-file NHS do-ers. They’re not doctors or specialists either, not one of them is involved in the actual practice of making people well.

These are top-level “executives” brought in on the advice of “consultants” – and paid an outlandish fortune for “high calibre” expertise at short notice.

Unhealthy business practice

And “consultant” of course does not mean an expert in the medical sense – but a management consultant, whose only connection to anything vaguely medical might be a thing called a balance “sheet”.

Sad cases, these guys. Even on mega-buck salaries they can’t manage their own lives, often demanding even more.

Put that against nurses and midwives, who have yet to receive the 1% pay rise they were hoping for in 2014.

Yup, you got it. It’s the non-medical side of the NHS that’s soaking up all the money.

So don’t go bad-mouthing A&E departments because they can’t get through the deluge of winter patients needing attention. Go chuck rocks at the managers who failed to provide facilities and resources for them to do their job properly.

Do they doctor the books too?

Gross mismanagement? You better believe it.

This item from The Telegraph is just the tip of the iceberg: ‘Medway Foundation Trust, recently named as having one of the worst A&Es in the country according to patient surveys, paid Nigel Beverley rates of £1,740 a day until he left just before an inspection found A&E in a “state of crisis”‘.

Unfortunate isn’t it, that GBH is against the law?

Except such monsters have no place in hospitals, or anywhere near one.

The only rightful place for them is buried under the sewage of their own making.

Originally posted on 11 August 2018 @ 10:22 am

Killers in the bathroom – which bug will you catch?

Woman washing face
Should you ever trust your face-cloth again?

Last week’s post about dirty make-up brushes, started the wheels going round.

It’s not just make-up brushes – how about all the other stuff?

Routine, yes – but seriously scary.

Especially getting up in the morning.

So most of us start with the toothbrush, right? Rinse it under the tap, squeeze out some toothpaste, straight into brushing.

Germs are lurking

Er… Except where was the toothbrush when you started? Ready in a mug next to the mirror? Rinsed off and standing there since last night? “Rode hard and put away wet”?

Ew!

Germs and moisture, remember? And this is the season – flu, colds, norovirus – take your pick. Your toothbrush has been up all night surrounded by all of them.

Where’s the boiling water! Where’s the Milton!

Better still, where’s the toothbrush steriliser?

Ultra violet safeguard

Because if you want to be safe, you’ve got to ninja out those germs before they get started. And locking your toothbrush in a UV box for ten minutes is about the best way to do it. The ultra violet destroys the germs DNA, viruses and bacteria don’t stand a chance.

Want proof the germs are there?

Take a good hard look round the edge of your wash basin. With all the water splashes, chances are good you’ll see little flecks of black along the grouting. Mould, fungus, breeding ground for all kinds of germs. Sprinkle some Glo Germ, which shows up germs under UV light, and you’ll be horrified.

Sure, you bleach them out with a regular wipe down. But what about your face-cloth, sponge, razor and nail brush? Used all the time, always wet. Even your towel. More of a hazard than you might have imagined.

Hospital discipline

Not the kind of games they play in hospital – where a routine scrub-up is a rigorous procedure.

Eight careful steps and five minutes of meticulous washing. Properly aseptic, not touching anything. Everything sealed before use and disposable. Sterilised scrubbing brush, sponge and nail pick – disposable one-time towels too.

If that’s too much PT in the morning, you can get all kinds of UV sterilisers to help. The drawer type is used by salons for manicure instruments and – you guessed it – make-up brushes.

For towels and bigger items, they look more like a kind of microwave oven – warming up the towels and blitzing them with UV, all in one hit.

Most flexible of all is the wand – though waving it around they way most people might probably achieves little. Proper irradiation requires closer to ten minutes.

Saving lives

UV certainly does the business. It’s press-button easy, click on/off – used wherever sterilising needs to be set up quickly. Of course medics still have to gown and scrub up with full kit for infectious diseases, but UV light tunnels are the failsafe to ensure no germs get in or out of operating areas.

Mobile UV robots might be overkill for your bathroom, they’re starting to be indispensable in doctor’s surgeries and dental clinics. So quick and simple, busy practices can handle high volumes of patients a day, secure that facilities are properly sterile before the start of each appointment.

Still want to use that toothbrush? You can get disposables, you know – even with paste.

In boxes of 100 too. Which makes it around 12p to save your life.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 2 August 2018 @ 6:57 am

Originally posted on 2 August 2018 @ 6:57 am

Ebola goes pop

Halloween Man
Weird, controversial – as long as it kills Ebola, who cares?

Halloween is weird, right?

Ebola party in Mayfair

Even so, top of the weird list has got to be Mayfair music club, The Scotch of St James, which this weekend will be hosting an Ebola-themed Halloween party.

As a high-profile celeb-infested landmark, The Scotch has predictably drawn plenty of negative comment – a “reprehensible” move, that “trivialises” matters “beyond the pale”.

But the Scotch is used to controversy – its list of “alumni” reads like a rock and roll who’s who – controversial every one of them, including Paul McCartney, The Who, and Jimi Hendrix.

Predictably though, the do-gooders have it back to front. As promoters for the event point out, it is actually a fancy-dress party based on “Saturday Night Fever” with Ebola as the focus for attracting donations to the volunteer network Médecins Sans Frontières‎.

Deadly memories

It is not the first time a deadly disease has caused celebrations, or triggered lasting traditions.

Across Europe the image of a doctor wearing a prominent beaked mask is still familiar, a memory of the bubonic plague epidemics of he Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries.

Almost an omen of the full-face masks worn against Ebola today, the beaked masks were filled with  ambergris, lemon balm, mint leaves, camphor, cloves, laudanum, myrrh and rose petals to counter the putrid air that was thought to be the cause of infection.

Killer plague

In the Republic of Venice, Italy, where the plague killed 146,000 people in 1576, a commemorative pontoon bridge is built every year across the 330-metre wide Giudecca Canal from the city’s administrative centre in San Marco to the basilica of the Chiesa del Santissimo Redentore in Dorsduro.

A religious ceremony and lavish fireworks display enables relieved citizens and the city’s leaders to give thanksgiving in the two-day Feast of Rendentore in July.

The plague hit Venice repeatedly.  In 1630 almost a third of the city’s population was lost, salvation from which is commemorated  in the magnificent church of Santa Maria della Salute, an iconic domed landmark that stands close to the entrance to the Grand Canal.

Will the current Ebola crisis bring similar gestures of relief from such incredible human suffering?

Weirdly – it being Halloween after all – we already have one.

Ebola website

Pierre Omidyar, the entrepreneur who founded the online auction site eBay, had a fascination with the virus. In fact back in 1995, when eBay was launched simultaneous with the second major outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, the website was mostly a collection of information about Ebola.

So, still uptight about holding a Halloween Ebola party?

Hey, whatever works.

As long as the world comes out of it safely, anything to help those poor people suffering from Ebola’s indescribable misery is worth it.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 18 July 2018 @ 1:44 am

Originally posted on 18 July 2018 @ 1:44 am

NHS strike: who can blame them?

Aggro woman
You’d strike too, if people wasted your time the same way

Shock, horror. Whatever will we do?

No gumming up A&E with split fingernails. No ambulance to pick up the shopping from Tesco.

It’s a disgrace, that’s what it is.

You betcha.

The real price tag

Over-worked health professionals doing 12 hour shifts for small change, while the fat-cat administrators pull down enough to fund a small country.

You’d strike too, under those circumstances.

For a lot more than the 1% these folk are asking.

Day and night they’re on the job, every day of the year. With rank-and-file workers often on less than £1,800 a month.

So how long would you last on that, at the pace they have to work at?

Pie in the sky

Meanwhile, in those swish Band 9 offices with the reserved parking bay outside, £1,800 might be closer to the take-home for a week.

And these aren’t necessarily doctors, mind. Not even technical experts.

Amazing where you can get with the right politics, isn’t it? And the right network.

Plugged in all the way to Westminster. Where salaries and expenses and budgets don’t mean a lot anyway.

Unless you’re the unfortunate one in the hot seat who’s unavoidably responsible.

So the actual workers are jumping up and down for a 1% increase. Less than 50p a day. Not even parking money to the fat cats. Not even enough for their newspaper.

Peanuts at the price

Trim their salaries to make up the deficit and they wouldn’t even feel it. Half a day’s less sun-lounger on the beach at Ibiza.

Yet they and all the other heavies are complaining the strike will put lives at risk.

Except – reality check – lives are at risk already, if you’re an actual worker.

You try coming out on £1,800 a month – rent, utilities and groceries – with still enough to pay for your Oyster card to get to work. What do you mean, car? Is this some kind of joke?

Which is exactly what arguing the toss on this strike is.

Sure it pushes up costs, which the NHS cannot afford.

Unless it’s clawed back from the fat cats who none of us asked for or needed in the first place.

Let any one of them come into A&E and complain about the service.

Or sound off that the NHS is a waste of money, like that uber-large political dinosaur on TV last week.

What price, duty of care?

50p to fix your fingernail? Try doing that down the High Street.

Or does sir need special attention from falling out of a taxi after an evening of special networking? Slightly concussed are we? Bit of a broken leg?

Yes, it’s a waste of money fixing it up – but they’ll do it anyway. On the house, like they always do.

OK, so it’s 1% and we’ll all wind up paying for it somehow.

But who cares, if you’re really in trouble and could just die?

You won’t find more dedicated experts anywhere. (Tweet this)

Or better attention for your fingernails.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 19 August 2018 @ 2:33 pm

Originally posted on 19 August 2018 @ 2:33 pm

You’re not killing yourself working – that’s germs doing it for you

Headache
It’s germs – you’re not imagining it

The career move was a quantum leap.

From obscurity to marketing director at a single bound. Top banana in one the biggest media companies around.

Next stop fame, fortune and a run at the top spot in perhaps five years.

As if.

The first week was all euphoria. Glad-handing and endless lunches. Not a lot of time in the office.

Week two was the real thing. Head down and getting stuck in.

Round about when the headaches started. And the nausea. A weird feeling of unease. Worst of all, out of nowhere, an overnight lack of confidence.

Where? How?

The condition vanished away from work.

Even the M25 felt better.

Weekends were great. Home with the family, everything went away.

Not so great on Mondays.

By the third week, going to work brought looming dread.

The headaches started in thirty minutes. And the unwanted sensations. Claustrophobia, feeling dirty, a loss of balance, and always impending nausea.

A trip to the Doc didn’t help. Everything fine, fit as a fiddle.

So why was the job so lousy?

It wasn’t the job, it was the building.

Because week four was out at one of the branches. Intensive stuff – crack of dawn start, all day hard at it, after midnight back at the hotel. An adrenalin high, riding the crest of the wave. Exulting in the stuff they got though.

Then back to doom and gloom.

It couldn’t go on. Either something gave, or it was a new job.

And then the report at the back of the filing cabinet. The one that got buried because of the expense. Sick building syndrome. Move somewhere else or pull the place down.

Not options, either of them. Cash flow wouldn’t permit. How else did anyone think the job happened in the first place? Not a whizz-kid from Oxford or LSE, just plain and simple 9-to-5 ordinary.

Except there was a quick-fix for sick building syndrome. Not permanent, but enough to make people feel better. Yes, there were others – and everyone hated the place. Hated the mould and the rising damp. Hated the bugs that they gave off. And the smell.

In marketing they had a whip-round. Bought a triple-whammy machine that sprayed hydrogen peroxide. Killed germs in the air, the blurb said. Sterilised the place so there was nothing there. Right about the time when the balance sheet kicked upwards. The first lift-off in three years.

Sales had a whip-round too – and offered to go halvies. The stuff misted up their office till you could hardly see. But the bugs went.

And the depression. And the feeling of hopelessness.

Best turnover figures in twenty years.

Management got the message after that.

New offices in a new building. Everybody motivated.

Something else seemed to have happened too.

They kept the machine. Bought another two like it.

Something to do with keeping everybody healthy. Nobody ever pulled sickies when the rooms were sprayed.

Amazing that, really. Never getting sick again.

Because this was London, England – where everybody got colds, and colly-wobbles, and goodness know what.

Except not any more.

No germs, no sickness. Not a dickie-bird.

Smiley faces all round.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 5 July 2018 @ 8:30 pm

Originally posted on 5 July 2018 @ 8:30 pm

Why our old-hat approach to hygiene could make us crash and burn

Airport runway
Now arriving, a more effective way to be safe from germs

Living is a lot like flying.

Everything’s fine as long as it’s in balance.

Looks easy, feels easy – until it goes wrong. And sooner or later, something always does.

Off-course or off-colour – the tiniest thing could bring you down.  And they don’t come any tinier than bacteria and viruses.

So what makes you so sure that washing and scrubbing will keep you safe?

Just like flying, up in the air is where all germs live. And at less than 2 microns across, they’re so light they may never stop floating around – ready to grab hold as you walk through, billions and billions of them.

Which means clean hands are not enough. Not nearly enough. And such old-hat thinking could be the death of us.

Planes use radar to get through storms and other hazards.

But we just walk into room – blind to the norovirus or e.coli hovering in clouds – or the c. difficile and MRSA eddying by the doorway, just waiting to hijack us.

Most of the time, they just swirl off us. Another day in jeopardy, safely overcome.

But often they find a way into our bodies. A gasp of air laughing at a joke. A bite of a cheese-burger. The paper-cut on your finger from your letter of promotion. A common cold or something life-threatening in hospital? Whichever germ gets you first.

And we have no idea they’re there, those germs. Like how about a hotel room with 67.6 colony-forming units of bacteria per square centimetre? And that’s just on the TV remote.

We have no radar and germs are all over us.

Unless we get them first.

Because it IS possible to sterilise every room completely free of germs before we walk in.

No germs, no risk. Safe.

A completely different approach to hygiene altogether. On top of the usual.

It’s done with hydrogen peroxide – misted up super-fine so it permeates everywhere – electrostatically charged so it actively grabs viruses and bacteria and oxidises them to death.

Fact: and you can ask any doctor – no germ comes back from having extra oxygen atoms shoved at it.

So we might be blind to germs, but we can take them out totally in just 45 minutes a room. Utterly gone. No hazards at all.

Pilots still have clear air turbulence and wind shear to face, invisible perils that could kill.

In a sterile room we face nothing, no hazard, no threat of infection – unless before we enter some pathogen has already found a way inside our body’s defence system.

Yes, you should wash your hands.

But against increasing antibiotic resistant mutations, a new approach is vital if we’re all going to survive.

Hydrogen peroxide is your boarding pass.

Have a pleasant flight.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 27 June 2018 @ 5:49 pm

Originally posted on 27 June 2018 @ 5:49 pm

There’s only one way to treat deadly resistant superbugs

Man with gun
Viruses and bacteria don’t stand a chance, hydrogen peroxide kills them all

Get them before they get you.

Make them dead. Wipe them out completely.

You can, and it’s easy. All the nasties we’re scared to death of: MRSA, e. coli, salmonella, hepatitis C, H1N1, SARS, measles, rabies, yellow fever, polio – even ebola.

Because outside in the open, viruses and bacteria are just as vulnerable as you are.

No nice warm body to hide in and infect. No dirty slime to hide under on a tabletop. Defenceless against the right weapon.

And you just happen to have it. Good old O2 – oxygen.

Shove oxygen atoms at any pathogen and it rips their cells apart – oxidises them to oblivion. No germs, no chance of infection, nothing to invade your body. You’re safe.

And the delivery system?

A super-fine mist of ionised hydrogen peroxide. “Hyper”.

Seal up a room, spray this stuff in – and within 40 minutes all germs are dead. The place is sterile. Not a trace of a bug anywhere – including superbugs, the growing number of ugly mutations that are able to resist antibiotics.

Catch one of them, and you could be a goner.

So don’t take chances. Zap them first, while they’re floating around looking for you.

A pre-emptive strike.

Sprayed up into the air because that’s where germs are.

What, you think they’re only on worktops, floors and surfaces?

20% of them are, maybe. That’s where they settle, where most of their food opportunity is.
But 80% of any room is empty space – how else would we move around and be able to do things?
And these germ things are microscopic.

Take rhinovirus, for example – a really nasty infection as summer comes to an end. One cell is not even 0.02 microns across – you could get thousand of them on the head of a pin. A million.

Which means they’re so light, they’re always floating around- riding the air, sometimes not even settling in their whole life cycle.

Ready to catch on your clothing though. And your face, and your hands and any bit of you that’s exposed. Well, you’ve seen the pictures of the medics suited up against ebola.

And yes, they might spread on contact, but how do you think any kind of infection got there in the first place?

But ionised hydrogen peroxide is super-fine too – smaller than droplets of water. And electrostatically charged to spread up and out, reaching into cracks and crevices. Actively grabbing germs and destroying them.

All that’s left is oxygen and water – a film of moisture so thin, you hardly know it’s there.

Except that the room you’re standing in is utterly safe. No chance for superbugs, no illness, you’re well on your way to reaching 100.

Unless of course, you brought a bug with you.

Although you’re pretty safe, even then.

It can never be said enough, our doctors and nurses are the best in the world.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 1 July 2018 @ 7:12 pm

Originally posted on 1 July 2018 @ 7:12 pm

Is Ebola already here?

Fruit bat
Now appearing at a street market near you – instant health hazard

Brace yourself.

Reports from West Africa all acknowledge that the likeliest source of the Ebola virus is by cross-over from animals, particularly fruit bats.

The disease does not seem to affect them, but they are undoubtedly carriers.

They are also prey to huntsmen across West Africa, a daily source of protein – regularly eaten in some areas, prized as a delicacy in others.

Bushmeat

Known throughout the region as “bushmeat” – such traditional food includes illegally-hunted monkeys, gorillas, chimpanzees and forest antelope – even snakes and porcupines – game meats that are known hosts to Ebola, anthrax, yellow fever and several other deadly diseases.

Nostalgic for home, bushmeat is equally popular with the half million or so West African immigrants living in UK, mostly in London. Traditional soups like egusi, efo and ofe isla rely on it, so does the spicy stew kedjenou.

Unlawful and unhealthy

But bushmeat is illegal – completely unregulated by any health or food safety laws – all 7,500 tons of it smuggled in annually from Abuja, Lagos, Monrovia and Freetown – feeder airports from where the Ebola epidemic currently rages.

Outside the law, the processing of bushmeat is murky at best. It is usually cooked or smoked before market, but techniques are primitive and often hasty. Raw or semi-raw meat  is common, even here in UK.

In the open air market at Ridley Road in Dalston, East London, meats dripping blood are a regular sight. They have arrived in foul-smelling packages, bloody animal corpses sneaked through Heathrow by regular couriers.

Ticking timebomb

Any one of them could carry Ebola, untraced and untraceable – until the three-week incubation period is up and suddenly symptoms of malaria or yellow fever appear. Another few days and it’s something worse.

The trade is unstoppable too – highly profitable, driven by big business and mostly underground. In Hackney or Brixton for instance, a single ape steak might cost as much as £20.

Out in Sierra Leone, British Army soldiers are hauling dead bodies, protected by full hazmat suits and chemical disinfectants. At Ridley Road, dead animals from the same area are butchered with bare hands.

It’s no longer if Ebola breaks out in Britain, it’s when.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 16 July 2018 @ 12:29 am

Originally posted on 16 July 2018 @ 12:29 am

There’s something in the air – and it could kill you

Staring at bulletIt’s deadlier than a bullet too. Because it hits even when it misses.

Click on your TV and everybody’s in a panic about the ebola virus possibly becoming airborne.

Reality check, right there.

If you cast your mind back to the last time you saw pictures of a hurricane, you’ll quickly realise that ANYTHING can be airborne – buildings, people, sixteen-wheelers, livestock.

So how exactly can a microbe that is just a millionth of the size of the head of a pin be anything but?

One little waft of air will do it. Not even a puff. Get the right wind and it can blow right round the world. That’s how birds wind up on deserted islands. Or spiders from Argentina get to Antarctica every year.

“Possibly airborne?”

Don’t hold your breath. Because if the ebola cells that land on your clothing are concentrated enough, you’re already at risk. If they get inside you, you’re in trouble.

OK, pretend they’re mosquitoes. They’re buzzing around almost invisible, trying to bite you, right?

Buzzing around IN THE AIR. Just like ebola – only you can’t see ebola without a microscope.

Mosquitoes are easy. You grab a can of bug-spray and zap them. Fffffff-ttt! in the air.

Take them down before they take you. No bites, no itching. No worst-case scenario – malaria.

Same thing with ebola. Take down those microbes in the air – before they can get to you. Zap them out of existence.

How? By oxidising them, of course.

Because – surprise, surprise – we’ve known since the Nineteenth Century that no germ can survive having oxygen atoms shoved at it.

Since 1818, when French chemist Louis-Jacques Thenard discovered hydrogen peroxide.

That’s right. Spray the air and everything around with hydrogen peroxide and that ebola  virus is gone. Oblivionsville.

And so is every other bug in the air with it – MRSA, e. coli, c.difficile,  HIV, the whole stinking lot of them.

Which is another clue right there. When a germ infects you, it stinks. That’s your body rotting – turning into some disgusting goo so the germs can eat you.

But when you kill germs, the smells are gone. They can’t eat you, ‘cos they’re dead.

So yes, there’s something in the air.

Remember that next time a load of dust blows into your face.

That there’s billions and billions of nasty microbe thingies in there too. Ebola’s not the only one that’s deadly.

But as long as your body’s defence threshold is good – you’ve slept, you’ve eaten, you’re not drunk, you haven’t taken drugs – you should hold up OK.

Because now you can strike back, with something in the air of your own.

“Possibly airborne?”

It doesn’t have to be a problem.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 7 July 2018 @ 8:46 pm

Originally posted on 7 July 2018 @ 8:46 pm

Ebola, pshaw! With all these antibiotic-resistant bio-nasties around, you could die from a paper cut

Woman in gasmask
You can run – and you can hide – but you can’t stop taking precautions

No good hiding under the bed. The germs will get you there too.

Because washing hands is only the start. If we’re all going to survive, our whole hygiene habit needs a big re-think.

Like, what have you got in the house that kills germs?

Bleach? Disinfectant? Puh-leeze!

Against the kind of viruses and bacteria we have lurking around these days, they don’t even feel it.

And yes, you’re scared about Ebola. But you should be just as worried at catching the flu.

What does that poster in your doctor’s surgery say? “Unfortunately, no amount of antibiotics will get rid of your cold.”

They won’t work on a lot of other things either. Ebola is one. MRSA is another – methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus – a 9-to-5 germ that lives here in good old UK.

And if you’re not worried, your doctor is.

Because now there’s a whole stack of illnesses he can’t treat you for because the drugs don’t work any more. The whole medical profession is faced with going back to the Nineteenth Century. Maybe not leeches and blood-letting, but still pretty clunky.

But don’t just worry, do something.

Think twice about everything you do, and don’t take chances. That Spanish nurse in Madrid? All she did was wipe her face with her surgical glove. Ebola misses nothing.

Better yet, hike up your bio-resistance threshold.

Your bio-wha…?

Your bio-resistance threshold – your germ defence, the force field around you that protects you, your anti-germ shield.

OK, there’s not much you can do about that in the open – though with winds and breezes around blowing everything away, most of the time we’re safe enough.

Indoors though, is where we are most of the time. And with winter coming, we’re all set to pass on infections one to another. Kids in school. Colleagues at the office. If there’s a bug going around, we’re all going to get it.

But not if we’re smart.

Because right now it’s possible to sterilise the entire room you’re in in around ten minutes flat – the walls, the furniture, the floor, the space you move around in. No viruses, no bacteria, no anything. Every trace of a germ, gone.

It won’t get rid of the cold you’ve got. But it will lower the chances of anyone else getting it. Or you going down with the tummy twinges THEY had, lingering in the air from yesterday.

The quick way to do it, is with an aerosol can of ammonium chloride. Hit the button, mist the place up, germs gone in ten. Any viruses or bacteria are destroyed by being oxidised. You’re safe.

Thing is though, it’s like brushing your teeth. You have to do it regularly. Miss a day and the germs pile up. Because don’t forget, each of us is walking around in a cloud of maybe 3.5 million microorganisms – germs – every moment of every day.

But like we said, don’t worry, there’s also a cheaper, better way – almost two thirds cheaper – and 100,000 times better.

Trundle in that wheelie-bin-sized auto-robot and press the button. It releases a super-fine mist of hydrogen peroxide, oxidising germs just like ammonium chloride. But way more efficiently – 99.9999% – a Sterility Assurance Level of Log 6.

And sterile means sterile. It knocks out germs by shoving oxygen atoms at them. Out in the open instead of munching away inside your nice warm body, they cannot survive.  They are dead, killed, annihilated, destroyed, eliminated, sent to oblivion. All viruses and bacteria.

And because Ebola is a virus, it will be gone too – if it was ever there in the first place. Along with all this winter’s crop of the usual bio-villains – MRSA, E. coli, norovirus and Clostridium difficile.

Breathe easy?

You can. But you’d better keep watching for those paper cuts. You may not get an infection – but they still hurt like hell.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 10 July 2018 @ 10:04 pm

Originally posted on 10 July 2018 @ 10:04 pm