If soap won’t hold against Coronavirus or Ebola, should we burn the place down?

Burning houseThey didn’t have soap when the world-wide Plague first hit in 1348.

Not unless you were landed gentry and brought the stuff back from Italy or France.

Are we going to die?

Nobody knew about hygiene or anything, so if you caught the Plague it was a death sentence.

Ebola is a virus. So is COVID-19, the coronavirus.

The Plague was, and is, a bacterium – yersinia pestis. It’s still alive today in various parts of the world – like the south-western US.

And way more deadly.

Virulent as it is, the World Health Organisation puts the average survival rate from Ebola at 50%. Scary, but far less lethal, US studies put the current Cornavirus mortality rate at around 3%.

But if you came down with the pneumonic form of the Plague, you’d be lucky to make it at all. Mortality averages at 95% or higher. No wonder they called it the Black Death.

The clean revolution

Today of course, we know about hygiene and keeping things clean. Which means controlling vermin and their parasites too – ie, the bacteria-carrying fleas on the rats that brought the Plague to Europe throughout the Fourteenth Century.

We also know about social distancing – keeping our distance from each other and choosing to self-isolate.

Half of Europe died in that first pandemic. And again, right through to the Seventeenth Century. No soap, no hygiene – so Britain was ravaged repeatedly.

Rescue by fire

Until the Great Fire of London stopped it dead in its tracks. By which time Black Death had killed half the people. Up to 7,000 a week died in the months leading up to that catastrophic blaze. Which made burning it all down one of the biggest hygiene levellers in history.

So should we get out the matches to stop Coronavirus or Ebola?

Surprisingly, good plain old soap and keeping ourselves clean stops a lot of bugs getting to us already. Without dirt and slovenly habits, even Ebola finds it more difficult to get traction.

But just as people were ignorant about germ defence in the Fourteenth Century, so our heads are in the sand about serious protection in the Twenty-First.

Both Coronavirus and Ebola can be stopped, totally – before they even get to us. Because like all viruses and bacteria, it cannot survive being oxidised.

How to fight back

OK, we can’t exactly fumigate the whole planet. But must of us in temperate countries live indoors. And we can mist up enclosed spaces – especially where larger numbers of us congregate – office buildings, schools, hotels, restaurants.

And the super-oxidiser that works best for this is hydrogen peroxide.

Right now, we have the machines and the know-how to mist places up. Ionising them as it happens, to boost spread and reach. With an electrostatic charge, so it reaches out and grabs germs as it finds them, ripping their cell structure to bits.

Slightly more effective than soap. And less devastating than reaching for the matches.

You’re still right to be worried about Coronavirus and Ebola.

But before anything happens, it IS possible to do something about them.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi. Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead. The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 8 July 2018 @ 9:29 pm

Originally posted on 8 July 2018 @ 9:29 pm

Luvvy-Duvvy Dentist Saves Lives

Indian beauty
Pulsed ultra violet – protection against pathogens in seconds

Blame British Airways. It was their sirloin steak that collapsed the tooth filling at 36,000 feet.

The very next chomp brought agony at 2.00 in the morning as the side of the tooth broke off onto the plastic plate.

Four more hours to Mumbai. With the paracetamol from the cabin attendant doing nothing at all. A pounding headache and cheek swollen out like a puffer fish.

Hurry up and wait

Murder at the airport. Ten hours to get a passport stamp, though it could only have been ten minutes. The hotel sent a car, hooray. Except the driver spoke no English – happy-happy cruising like we had all day.

Not nice to die at sunrise – in a strange place, thousands of miles from home.

Except the manager was brilliant. One look and he reached for the phone.

“Emergency please, doctor luvvy-duvvy.”

A mistake, surely. Or an unfamiliar Indian name.

Doctor Lavi Davi, that seemed about right.

The manager spun the driver round and shoved him at the car. “Jaldi karana,” he yelled and slammed the door.

No cruising now. Lewis Hamilton on steroids. Schoolkids, bikes, bullock carts, buses – all the people on the planet crammed into the single road ahead. No need for pain-killers, just triple double tranquillisers.

Another ten minutes that felt like ten hours.

The Empire sleeps on

Quieter side streets. A crumbling wall. A short dusty driveway to a broken down colonial relic of a house from the days of the Raj.

Doctor Luvvy-Duvvy in big letters on a purple signboard.

Out of the car in a cloud of dust. Through a crowded waiting room into air conditioned coolness and a waiting dentist’s chair.

The door shut.  Ah, sanity!

A big 4×4 pulled up outside. A flashy designer job for climbing up on pavements. Mercedes or Porsche or something. This would bend the debit card.

A nurse set up the chair. Flashy was right. The latest recliner model with all the goodies. She set up the splash-bib and Health & Safety glasses. Just like home.

“Doctor will be here now.” She nodded at the car outside the window.

A vision stepped in. Straight from a Bollywood movie. Poised, elegant and drop-dead gorgeous.

She pulled a purple smock over her head. The heart-shaped badge said Luvvy-Duvvy.

“Doctor Geetha Khan,” she said. Melodic, like wind chimes. “Let’s take a look.”

Silky smooth, surely a goddess. “The hotel said it was life or death.”

The gentle dental touch

Her fingers were careful, bred to handling crystal. The touch was confident. She knew her stuff.

Another ten minutes. Ten hours for discomfort. Ten seconds while this magical creature worked her miracle. Pain gone, swelling gone. Relief at being human again.

“Thank you, thank you, thank you.” It couldn’t be said enough.

She smiled. The whole world sighed.

Sitting up, slightly giddy. “Please tell me, I’m new to your country. Why Luvvy-Duvvy?

The smile broadened – somewhere the light shone brighter and flowers opened their petals.

Ultra violet germ killer

“Over there,” she pointed to a grey box on wheels, the Luvvy-Duvvy badge big across its front panel. “We named our practice after it – it saves lives.”

Luvvy-Duvvy?”

“Come.” She took my hand – instant, irreversible love.

Back into the crowded waiting room, the nurse coming too. The Doc-goddess had a remote in her hand. She pulled the door to, not quite closing it.

“Watch.”

Reflected purple light flickered off the wall panels inside.

Pulsed ultra-violet,” she said. “This is a hot country. People come straight in off the street, bringing all manner of germs. Take your chances outside, operating theatre inside.”

She nodded at the door. “Luvvy-Duvvy for the UV. That thing sterilises my operating room before and after every patient. Five minutes, bang.”

She pushed open the door. A long glass tube was subsiding back into the machine. “No viruses, no bacteria. I work with people’s open mouths every day. No infections on my watch.”

The crowded waiting room was watching.

“Please excuse me, this is a busy day,” she said. Wind chimes again. “Enjoy our country while you can. Just don’t chew on that side for a day or two.”

A miracle place, India. Can’t help loving the place.

Luvvy-duvvy me.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 28 July 2018 @ 5:55 am

Originally posted on 28 July 2018 @ 5:55 am

Double your money – get rid of the germs

Open freeway
Where the money is – when there’s no germs

‘It’s only earning money when it’s on the road.’

Russell Dalton learnt that rule the hard way when he started his business with just one lorry.

He brainwashed his son with it, when they bought their second vehicle – a Mercedes Actros 1848 which cost a bomb, but which his son said was the best economy because it was the best.

OK, so it was second-hand, it still had to make money. Ensure every trip was a full load and they’d be laughing. His son could have the Merc, he was Foden man himself. They didn’t make ’em any more, but they always kept going and brought the money in.

Trouble was, they had this new contract to haul fruit. Fine, they bought two refrigerated trailers to handle it, but the trips were only one-way. Super-clean or nothing for the supplier’s bananas – which meant no return loads to top up the kitty. To keep clean they had to run empty.

Throwing money away, that’s what it was.

With an average of two hundred miles a trip, Dalton actually felt pain at coming back with nothing. Specially when they could bring junk packaging back – full loads, all they could carry. Money for old rope from a long-time pal.

Which is round about when Dalton discovered the Cobra machine. Some farmer on the Internet was using this gun-thing to sterilise his livestock sheds. Zapping airborne germs so his cows never got sick. STERILISING, for Pete’s sake. Must be industrial strength battery acid with all that cow dung and hay.

Until he checked it out. The thing sent out a fine mist of hydrogen peroxide, the same stuff his Mum used to use on his scraped knees when he was a nipper. Apparently the HP latched onto germs in mid-air with a 99.9999% kill rate. No smell in the barn, nothing. Just healthy cows.

Which got Dalton thinking about bananas. If 99.9999% of bacteria could be wiped out in the 45 minutes it took to work, his lorries would be safer than an operating theatre.

What the heck, there might be money in it. So he bought himself as germ detection kit for a couple of grand. Got a Cobra and misted up the Foden after another one-way banana trip. Clean as a whistle, actually better than it was before he started.

So he got on the blower to the supplier.

If he could could guarantee no viruses or bacteria every trip, would the supplier let him haul other stuff on the return?

The bloke just about had a cadenza. “Backfilling” was unhygienic, he said. Customers would get food poisoning and the outlets he supplied would sue.

So Dalton showed him the detection kit. Ran it round his lorry, the supplier’s warehouse  and his offices too. Red-faced, the bloke was. With all the burger crumbs on his desk, his own office was more contaminated than their toilets!

It proved Dalton’s point though. And got the nod to carry stuff on return trips, on condition that every new delivery had the lorry hosed out and sterilised before loading. A piece of cake – done!

Which is why you’ll find Dalton is jumping up and down about his new Actros. The one they ordered when the balance sheet nearly doubled.

Damn it, those things only make money on the road, what’s it doing sitting in the dealer’s showroom?

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

Say your bye-byes to stinky germs in the car

Woman smelling rose
Supersafe Supermum’s got germ problems licked

It was brand-new, out the box. A glittering German 4×4, perfect for climbing up kerbs to park on pavements.

A Chelsea tractor, yes, they knew that. So Arthur named it Fergus – they had an old Ferguson tractor rusting by the gate at the farm next door when he was growing up.

Bundle of trouble

The baby was new too. A thumping giant at eight pounds and seven ounces, definitely a rugby player – lock forward at least, maybe even a scrum half.

Gwen chose the name Lance – as it had to be with a Dad called Arthur and living in a house called “Camelot”.

Wow, but the car was amazing to drive. Top of the range, four-and-a-half litres – pure indulgence and why not?

Both of them were at the top of their game, Arthur in the City, Gwen with her own PR outfit. High-earning DINKS (Double Income No Kids) they could afford the odd reward – like the skiing holiday they took in Austria six months before Lance arrived.

Lance was amazing, of course. So intelligent – definitely a transplant surgeon or nuclear physicist.

Reality and babies

Messy though. Every lunch bowl upside down on the floor. Every sterilised bottle dribbling on its side. And the nappies – better not to go there.

It got better when Lance graduated to a drinking mug. Two handles to hold and he liked using it. Best of all, it calmed him down. So Gwen let him have it, strapped in the back seat on the way to the office.

Sign a few cheques, crack a few heads, a quick trip to the park to feed the ducks, and home.

Mistake.

They were on the M25 going great and Lance had his special – a weird mix of formula and blackcurrant, but what the heck, he liked it.

Not all the time though.

Somewhere on the long Surrey stretch between Leatherhead and Chertsey, the mug went upside down on the brushed cloth seat. Gwen knew nothing because Lance was quiet and the whole lot had leaked out when they got to Shepherd’s Bush.

It didn’t mop up and it left a mark.

Worse, on the return trip Lance did a repeat performance with a full load of OJ.

Sponge and detergent when she finally got Lance down. Then the miracle gop when Ocado delivered. It got the stain out. But when she parked in the sun two days later, the residue made the inside as high as a kite.

Germs, germs everywhere

A full-on cyberchondriac Mum, Gwen knew the score. Salmonella, listeria, campylobacter, and e. coli at least. Probably a whole bunch more.

Fergus was an infected death trap on wheels and Lance was in danger.

Fergus went to the dealership to have the seat replaced and Gwen started using taxis. Until some driver gave her lip about kids upchucking in his cab.

More germs, more danger – Arthur had to drive them everywhere strapped in in the Lexus, with Gwen riding shotgun, holding Lance’s bottle while he drank. Less than ideal and a real pain until Fergus came back.

Gwen promised herself, no more drinking mug in the car – the very same afternoon that Lance screamed his lungs out through every inch of a four-and-a-half mile tailback. Another idea that never flew.

The next OJ hit was a day later.

Gwen screamed and climbed on the laptop. Somewhere out in Cyberdom there had to be an answer. Come on Google, make your magic.

The stuff arrived two days later – £8 extra for express delivery.

No smells, no germs

More formula by that stage. And a split milk carton in the luggage space, thrown there in a strop after a barney with some woman in the checkout queue.

Ammonium chloride it said on the label, an aerosol misting spray.

She got to it late one afternoon when Lance was down. Shut all the windows, put the can in the car, pressed the button and got out of there. Mist was right, more like fog – the kind that shuts airports down for three days.

Arthur came home in the middle of it. Leapt out of the Lexus scrabbling for the fire extinguisher. “For Pete’s sake, Gwen – your car’s on fire.”

She stopped him just in time. Arm wrestled the extinguisher away from him. Opened the door and let the mist escape out. Strong lemony smell, no trace of sour milk.

She gave it another bash the next day, Supermum on overkill. Again, no trace of sour milk – and the miracle gop took care of the stains. She loaded up Lance, suspicious as hell.

Except the smells were gone and Lance was happy as Larry. No sniffles, no dodgy tummy, full of the joys of spring. Still lethal with the drinking mug of course – Sir Spillalot. They averaged a new hit every one-and-a-half journeys.

Gwen got more of the stuff. Misted up the car every two days. No smells, no germs – it oxidised viruses and bacteria to nothing, could even handle that horrid Ebola.

Next coffee club morning with all the Mums complaining about colds and tummy bugs, she just sat there with Lance smelling like a rose.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 31 July 2018 @ 6:16 am

Originally posted on 31 July 2018 @ 6:16 am

There’s restaurants and restaurants – why’s this one so heavenly?

Stairway to heaven
No germs or bacteria, no collywobbles or funny tummy

It’s a classy place with a famous chef.

Prime location, soft lighting, designer place settings.

And why not? You’ve earned this.

A night out to please every indulgence.

An impressive menu too.

AIR CONDITIONED, it says at the bottom. Well, of course.

STERILISED DAILY.

Sterilised?

You call the maître d’.

Sterilised – has there been a health problem?

You’ve read about these celebrity places.

Surprise inspection – rats in the kitchen, worms in the salad, everybody down with norovirus.

Surprise is right – a pleasant one for you. And a thing of the future, happening now.

Seems the whole restaurant is sterilised for your safety and protection.

You glance round. At the soft drapes and high ceilings. The expensive-looking chandeliers.

You’ve watched Downton Abbey, you know how tricky those things are to clean.

A confident grin from the maître d’.

They have a robot.

A nifty thing on wheels that they roll in when everyone’s gone. Close all the windows and doors and the thing mists up the place – an ultra-fine mist of hydrogen peroxide. Seems no germ can withstand it. Not even this ebola stuff that has everyone in a tizz.

Apparently this mist stuff is ionised too. So it rises up, into, and under everything. With charged particles that grab hold of bacteria and viruses – shoving oxygen atoms at them. Dead and gone, unable to touch anybody – and that means you.

And they do this every day, so you’re safe. The whole restaurant, the kitchen, the loos – even the cloakroom.

When they open the doors, you’re into a place where germs can’t touch you. Unless that bloke with the sneeze on Table Four brought something in with him. Not so likely to get to you though, if the whole place is sterilised.

So you can relax and indulge. Even you with your sensitive tummy. Dare to be different and get away with it.

Like the trout almondine. If you’ll pardon the expression, it’s to die for. Meaning of course that it’s heavenly.

Good choice.

And as you knew when you sat down, you deserve it.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 27 June 2018 @ 5:28 am

Originally posted on 27 June 2018 @ 5:28 am

Time to celebrate – you need never catch an infection again

Party
Happy, happy! You’ve survived the germs AGAIN!

Congratulations. Your body has just survived exposure to 29,743,987,435 germs.

That’s about how many surround you at any one time.

And congratulations. Thirty seconds later, and you’ve just done it again.

Only this time it’s 32,867,201,591 germs. And no, they’re not the same ones.

They just keep coming and coming and your body has to cope with this onslaught every second of every day.

Don’t believe it?

When was the last time you stood waiting in the Underground, and your face got blasted with dust?

And how many dust particles do you reckon that was? 8 million? 80 million?

OK, now your average virus or bacteria is probably around a million times smaller than a single speck of dust.

Smaller than the pollen that gives you hay fever. Smaller than the particles in cigarette smoke. Smaller than droplets of water vapour in a cloud. So really, really tiny, it’s why you can’t see them at all.

But they’re there alright.

You wouldn’t walk into a room full of people with bird flu, would you? But you can’t see the bird flu. So how do you know it’s there?

But it’s not just the bird flu you have to worry about. It’s the 23,849,362,072 other viruses and bacteria floating around. By the way congratulations. You’ve just survived again.

But what if you didn’t?

What if you forgot to wash your hands , just the once? Or breathed something in? Or did something stupid like the philosopher Sir Francis Bacon back in 1626?

Famously in March of that year, he was driving in his carriage when it occurred to him to check out how coldness might affect the decay of meat. He stopped, bought a chicken, had the guts pulled out, and crouched down on the ice to stuff it full of snow, right there and then.

Spot the mistake?

Yeah, he caught a chill so bad that he couldn’t go home. So they took him to his pal’s house, the Earl of Arundel, put him to bed. It didn’t help. The chill became pneumonia and the poor bloke conked on 9th April.

Oh, and by the way, congratulations again.

Maybe now you’ve got some idea of how much hazard we all face, every single day. And it gets worse when we’re all together.

Some of us are healthier than others. And as we know well, very often the sick ones pass on their germs. Because the one particular bug is more concentrated in their system and ready to invade.

So down we come with the bug and we didn’t even do anything!

All unnecessary.

Because, as we have known since the Nineteenth Century – only 200 years after Bacon’s time – ALL germs die if we clobber them with hydrogen peroxide.

And if we get clever with Twenty-First Century technology, we can spray it up in the air in an ultra-fine mist and knock out every single one of them in an average room in just 20 minutes.

No congratulations this time because there aren’t any germs any more. The place is sterile.

Still cause for celebration though.

For the first time in history, you’re safe. You can’t get ill because nothing can touch you.

So why don’t we do this all the time – in schools, restaurants, hotels, offices, everywhere?

No idea, you tell us.

Which makes us just as stupid as Sir Francis. All of us.

Why let disaster happen when you don’t have to?

Better stay off the chicken and bacon – just in case.

But at least you’re safe =- at least for now.

Because there’s one more thing.

You have to keep at it with the hydrogen peroxide because the germs come back.

People bring them in on their clothes, or let them waft in when they enter.

So congratulations again. You just survived another 35,987,061,362 potential infections.

But you could get awfully hammered, celebrating all the time.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 5 July 2018 @ 8:26 pm

Originally posted on 5 July 2018 @ 8:26 pm

Super-healthy Super Kids

Super kid
Look Ma, no germs! When you’re healthy, the whole world is yours

As schools go, it’s not big.

350 kids – Year Three to Year Six.

Previous Ofsteds were “Good” and the last one “Outstanding”.

But the thing a lot of parents are starting to notice is, none of the children get sick.

On the wall next to the bursar’s office is a plaque. “For the safety of children and staff, the school premises is sterilised every day in rotation.”

They have to thank the Head Teacher for that. Pat Whatshername. Because she knew 350 kids together in one enclosed place was a sure-fire breeding-ground for colds and collywobbles.

She bullied and cajoled the governors to buy the four auto-robots that spray the place with hydrogen peroxide, four classrooms at a time, every evening after hours.

Buying them would have been a no-go. For a big capital expense like that in one hit, the County Council would have blocked it.

But the Head got smart. Found a way to lease them and got the parents to stump up the cash. Presented the idea to Mums and Dads in her red sweater and boots, with the Princess Grace hair from way back.

The Mums were a bit iffy in their tracky bottoms and sneakers – but the Dads lapped it up. Especially the bit about only £1 per child per month – less than the tea and biscuits they shelled out for every meeting.

So every night, Komnan – he’s from Ghana – sets up the four machines in a different classroom, shutting all the windows and doors. Each of them clicks on and mists the room for around 45 minutes. Toilets and changing rooms are smaller, they get 30 minutes.

The hydrogen peroxide spray is ionised and boosted with colloidal silver. It spreads up and out, destroying germs in mid-air, reaching deep into cracks and crevices.

At a 99.9999% kill rate, no viruses or bacteria survive. If there are any around, it’s when the kids bring in new ones from outside, next day.

Last thing before he goes home, Komnan puts all four machines in the hall – where assemblies, gym and school meals take place – nobody’s coming down with gastro in here.

An “Outstanding” Ofsted – and some really bright kids. With more bounce and go than most you might meet.

Being healthy has to be the answer.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

Until we start cleaning the air, we’re always going to catch germs

Girl in germs
You can’t see germs, but they’re always there – waiting to get you and make you ill

No, no, not pollution – not just smoke and dust and airborne waste, but actually purging the air itself free of harmful bacteria.

Because like it or not – germs, viruses, bacteria, pathogens, whatever you want to call these horrible bugs  – are all in the air, all the time. Billions and billions of them, too small for the eye to see. So tiny that several million of them would fit on the head of a pin.

You’ve seen dust move on the air, swirling around, up there for days. Well imagine stuff that is tinier than that, so light it rides the air for ever, sometimes never settling at all. That’s how germs move about, hoping to catch on one of us and make us ill. To feed and breed on us until we die.

Yes they spread by contact too, from somebody who is infected. But don’t kid yourself you’re safe, just by keeping your distance. If there’s germs in the room – and there always are –  chances are good some that some of them will land on you.

Just maybe not enough of them to do any harm.

You see, just one or two of them have still got to get through your skin, into your lungs or digestive system.

Somehow they’ve got to get through the acid mantle, the protective dermis itself, then beat the antibodies in white blood cells – neutrophils, leukocytes that trigger hydrogen peroxide, the body’s own natural germ killer that oxidises them to nothing.

No chance, right? A suicide mission.

But not the same when some sneezes all over you, or glad-hands you from their hospital bed.
That’s not individual cells any more – there’s several million in a gob of snot or sneeze-spray – even more with skin-to-skin contact.

Boom. Right there, they gotcha. You are now infected.

And all the time we’re running round, scrubbing hands, clothes, counters, worktops, tables and whatever, convinced we’re protecting ourselves.

Well yes, we are – from the 20% of germs that have actually settled on objects around us.

The other 80% are still swirling around – in singles, in clumps, and sometimes dirty great droplets, just waiting to get us. And if we’re careless, they will.

So how do we scrub the air – as well as all the work surfaces and stuff?

Same way the body does, with hydrogen peroxide.

Mist up a sealed room with ionised hydrogen peroxide spray and it’s airborne, just like the germs are. It’s light too, finer than water droplets – electrostatically charged to reach out and grab onto things like viruses and bacteria.

Boom, boom. It’s backatcha with oxygen atoms that rip the germ cells to pieces. Bye-bye bio-thugs, they’re dead and gone.

Forty minutes or so later, you’re in a room that’s totally sterilised. No bacteria, nothing.

Even the hydrogen peroxide’s gone too – as it releases those oxidising atoms, it decomposes into just oxygen and water. Actually water vapour which evaporates, because there’s no trace of drops or anything.

Trouble is though, not enough of us know we should do this. We’re still rushing around, slaving at floors and surfaces and wiping our hands with gel, hoping we’ll get away with it.

Not wrong. But not enough. Clean is not necessarily safe.

To beat germs and win, we need to fight the other 80% as well. Because until we do, we’re all going to catch a bug. Sooner or later.

Atishoo!

And bless you. Have a nice day.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 3 July 2018 @ 7:56 pm

Originally posted on 3 July 2018 @ 7:56 pm

Getting sick on the plane: the good news and bad news

Travelsick woman
Up and away – and down with a bug

So you’re off somewhere nice on one of those shiny new airliners – a Boeing 787 Dreamliner or and Airbus 380. Jet-set you, all ready to enjoy yourself.

Just possibly as you board, a little thought niggles you. These are long-haul aircraft – you’re going to be sitting here for eight hours or more. Breathing the same air, sharing the same space as several hundred other people.

What if you catch a germ?

Actually, chances are pretty good that you won’t. Not from the aircraft anyway. Up in the sky you’re breathing air that’s completely refreshed 20 times an hour, purified by hospital grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters.

Those cold or flu like feelings you sometimes get are nothing to do with infection. It’s just how your body reacts after several hours in a bone-dry, oxygen thin cabin atmosphere. Sometimes they linger, sometimes they don’t.

But the filters take out 99.97% of bacteria in your immediate area. In fact every seven rows has its own independent ventilation system. So if something makes you feel queasy on a flight, it’s not from the air being pumped at you.

Fellow passengers though, are another matter. Not from how healthy they are, but from what they do. If you’re going to catch a bug from the person sitting next to you, eight hours is still a very short exposure time. Unless of course, they’re sneezing all over you.

Consider though, the environment that you’re in. Sure, you’re going somewhere nice, but for the next eight hours you’re a prisoner to your seat. You might go to the loo to stretch your legs, but most of the time you’re just sitting there, you can’t really move.

OK, so what happens with trolley service and meals? You’ve had your drink, a good holiday vodka and orange juice – now they come at you with a full tray of dinner. So where do you put your plastic glass and drink can?

Only one place, the seat-back pocket.

Don’t go there. Because that is the place everyone puts everything. And if the cabin crew aren’t actually collecting trash at the moment you need them to, that’s where it all goes. Along with your tissues, your book, the well-thumbed magazine, the flight safety guide and…

Oh, oh, there’s the seat belt sign, just as Mum is changing a nappy. Into the seat pocket it goes, along with the half-finished Mars bar from a previous flight, an apple core and a wad of well-chewed gum.

Not from your flight of course. That stuff was lifted out before you boarded. But the residue is still there, the stuff you can’t see. And because nobody can wash their hands just sitting there, it’s on the tray table as well. On the armrests and seat back. Invisible MRSA and e. Coli. Or maybe worse.

And don’t even think about the blankets and pillows.

Yet all the while the HEPA units are pumping out fresh, filtered air. You’re safe, but you’re not safe, all at the same time. Though that’s mostly on long-haul. A lot of regional jets don’t have the same filter units. That quick hop to Ibiza or Magaluf might be more iffy than you’d like.

Which makes hygiene on the ground more critical than airlines think. A quick wipe down with an antiseptic cloth will not sort germs in the seat pocket or upholstery. Because research already shows viruses and bacteria can survive in those areas for up to a week.

There is one sure way to remove them though.

Sterilise the whole aircraft pre-flight.

Mist up the entire interior with a powerful oxidising spray of hydrogen peroxide in which harmful pathogens cannot survive. Dispersed by mobile auto-robots for the main cabin interior, with a generous squirt from hand-held units into every seat pocket.

All before anybody boards.

That mist kills 99.9999% of viruses and bacteria in the air – and on every surface it makes contact with – head cushions, armrests, hand rails, window covers, overhead lockers – everything.

Electrostatically charged, it reaches into corners and crevices too – especially tray tables, even though they’re folded away. Boosted by colloidal silver to perform better.

You want to eat off that? You can.

Just make sure though, that your airline actually does all this.

Otherwise, if you’re worried – sit tight, use alcohol hand-wipes – and save your appetite for when you’re back on the ground.

The HEPA units will keep you safe until then.

Originally posted on 14 May 2018 @ 5:32 pm

The Amazing Benefits of Hydrogen Peroxide!

Girl showing hands

It’s our most effective defence against superbugs and we’re hardly even using it! If ever there was a way to buy time for doctors to research new non-resistant antibiotics, this is it.

Check out this Top Tips bulletin by Joan Clark:

https://www.tipsbulletin.com/hydrogen-peroxide/

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 2 July 2018 @ 7:34 pm

Originally posted on 2 July 2018 @ 7:34 pm