Relax your room is “safenised”. No colds, no flu, no nasty tummy bugs – just luxury feelgood

Opening hotel room
The next dimension in luxury – no germs, no viruses, no bacteria, no nothing

Ah, bliss. The feelgood of knowing you’ve arrived and are safe.

Shoes off, door closed against the world. Time for your over-booked, jet-lagged body to relax with some serious chilling.

Wait a minute, shoes off?

Sure, and for the first time in a hotel.

All kinds of bugs are usually down there, however hard they vacuum. That’s why you never kick off, or bring your own slippers.

Not a care, not a germ

Not this time, though.

The bugs aren’t there or anywhere else. The place is safe and secure.

“Safenised” on top of the regular five star polishing and cleaning. Checked and waiting for you when you arrive.

No germs. No odours. No worries about catching bugs.

No running round with your usual anti-germ stunts first thing either. Feelgood luxury.

Which is why the shoes – you’ve read about “nice” hotels, and you’re being careful.

And the plastic bag for the TV remote. Not necessary this time, it really is safe.

Luxury.

Same thing with the bedside phone, though you make most calls with your mobile. You don’t want that thing next to your face while you sleep, all those microbes waiting to get at you. So yes, there’s a plastic bag for that too, even though you don’t use it.

Except this time you can. Because you’re going to call room service (you need a daquiri). And your voice sounds all weird through a plastic bag. Like a kidnapper or a stalker. The bag’s not necessary though, because the phone’s “safenised” too. You could get used to this.

And the cover for the bed, so you don’t need gloves to take it off and dump it in the corner.

Forget the usual hotel drill

OK, you’ll wash your hands like normal – a proper freshen up after the muck and sweat of traveling.

But you don’t need the disinfectant spray or hand-wipes this time either. The bathroom counter is safe and germ-free. So are the door handles and light switches you might have used on your way in.

Because everybody and his dog might have touched them – with none-too-clean hands after servicing the toilet, adjusting the air-con, or simply changing bed linen. So a seasoned traveller like you never misses giving them a wipe, just in case.

Again, not necessary this time. You can forget your usual drill. Feelgood and chill.

The entire place has been misted up with ionised hydrogen peroxide (iHP). Any germs that might have been around are now gone to oblivion.

Waking the tiger

Remarkable stuff this iHP. Only a mild 6% solution – but ionising awakens its sleeping tiger. Light as air in a dry mist spray, an electrostatic charge makes its particles shove each other to get away from themselves, dispersing in all directions.

The same charge makes them thrust out of their way to grab at oppositely-charged bacteria and viruses, clamping to them in a death grip. Oxygen atoms rip at the germs, tearing their cell structure to pieces.

It gets better. Because ionising produces even MORE antimicrobials – hydroxyl radicals, reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, ozone and ultraviolet. A hungry tiger on steroids and a hot tin roof.

Remember that electrostatic charge? It forces the tiger to move up and out – filling the air and pressing hard up against all surfaces. Pushing underneath things and behind. Lunging deep into cracks, crevices and inaccessible tight spaces. Those germs can’t outrun him, they can’t hide either.

Which takes care of everywhere – including places that never normally get looked at. Behind the bedside unit, under the bed, on top of the wardrobe, between all the cables to the TV.

In the shower cubicle too. Down the plug. Under the basin, behind the taps. Anywhere germs can lurk, the tiger’s going to find them.

Let luxury kick in

So yes, kick off your shoes (no germs on the carpet). Throw back the curtains (no germs on them either). Dive on the bed (free of germs and bed bugs) and chill with your welcoming house daiquiri of rum and lime juice (no flies on you).

Yes it’s luxury, but you’ve earned it.

And one day, all hotels will be germ-free this way.

Until then, you’re in the elite.

No way you’re pulling a sickie – even after the redeye from New York and five full presentations a day to fill your week.

The feelgood is real – and you’re going for it.

Picture Copyright: macniak / 123RF Stock Photo

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 13 June 2017 @ 1:48 pm

Originally posted on 13 June 2017 @ 1:48 pm

Could you be sued for your bad habits? Or spreading Coronavirus?

Girl - oh no
We could all be liable – and never even know

We all have them. Bad habits we don’t want anyone to know about.

Not always so easy with cleanliness and hygiene. Our “crimes” are too obvious to miss.

Yeah OK,  we know we should tidy up. Not just for appearances, but to stay out of trouble.

Easy enough for ourselves, but a minefield of nasty surprises when what we do impacts other people.

That’s the thing, see. It’s not just us. If it was, we could live like slobs and nobody would care.

A wider responsibility

Except we don’t live alone, do we? Family, friends, work colleagues, customers – our lives are intertwined with maybe hundreds of people – all of whom could get mighty pissed off if our behaviour messes with their health and living conditions.

Of course, a lot of this we already know – and unconsciously correct for.

A lift full of wrinkled noses at our sweat and BO very quickly persuades us to use regular deodorant. Same thing with breath fresheners and toothpaste.

Smells are offensive, yes. They’re also a sign of bacteria at work. Something isn’t right, so bacteria are eating it. The smell of infection and disease is a warning for others – it could be contagious, keep away.

And right there is our hiccup. What it is that makes bad habits bad.

Bacteria.

Actually microbes of all kinds – bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa. “Bugs” to most of us – nasty germs that make us ill and bring us down. At least that’s our usual experience of them.

And why our bad habits can bring so much trouble.

We luck our bugs onto other people and they can get ill. Depending on the illness, it could screw up their lives. There could be permanent damage – disability, deformity, mental impairment. They could even die.  Super bad habits, super bad all round.

None of which is likely to win us as friends. It’s our fault, we’ve ruined their lives, they want compensation. Think of a number with lots of zeroes behind it it. That’s us, paying for ever – the unwanted price for a silly bad habit.

Bad, bad, bad

And no, we’re not talking the gruesome stuff that some people get up to – eating food dropped to the floor per the crazy “five second rule”, eating off plates unwashed from a previous meal, or wearing week-old clothes.  We’re on about day-to-day things, the daily bad habits that all of us share.

Number One is not washing our hands. The lesson Coronavirus is teaching us, but we’re still not catching on.

We all reckon we do wash them, but most of the time we don’t, as these shocking statistics show:

How can we be so careless? Because we judge by appearances, not reality. Our hands look clean, therefore they are. Meanwhile, they’re anything but.

Which does ourselves no good – and those around us neither.

Sure, we’re better off than a century ago, but not because we wash our hands. Back then, many homes did not have a bathroom and most people washed only once a week – a tin bath in the kitchen, filled from the kettle. Toilets were the “long drop,” often outside. Even running water and sewerage were not available to everyone.

Modern day hygiene levels are a quantum leap away, which makes us a lot healthier. Bathrooms are essential, our super-efficient toilets are discreet – and our whole culture makes baths a regular indulgence, showers a daily treat. We’re cleaner and healthier in every possible way.

But not our hands.

Always hands

They get down and dirty as much as they always did. Germs are as invisible as they always were too. So we waltz through the day with the same carelessness that we always have, never thinking for a moment that many of our illnesses are therefore self inflicted.

All the usual bad guys – escherichia coli, salmonella, clostridium difficile, campylobacter, MRSA, norovirus, even colds and flu – are all afflictions picked up by direct contact. Plus of course the big monster, coronavirus.

And no, we don’t always catch them from food which is contaminated by them – more likely we catch them from food which we ourselves have tainted with our own mitts – germs from a whole day’s worth of touching things without washing our hands.

Just ask yourself this. Sitting down for a meal in a restaurant, when was the last time you washed your hands? Come on, genuinely?

When you came in? Before you left home? As you left work? After your last pee break? After lunch? After breakfast? When you did your teeth?

And how many things have you touched since that time? Things that were touched by other people?

How many germs did you pick up, or transfer elsewhere by direct contact?

And how many times did you touch your face during all of that, passing germs on through the soft tissue of eyes and mouth? (Hint: most of us touch our faces 2,000 – 3,000 times a day. Remember the movie Contagion?)

Germs on our hands!

Easily passed on by touching all the things we share in common. The firm handshake of friendship, door handles, light switches, keypads, documents, money, knives and forks. We pass germs to other people, they pass germs to us. Because it’s not just our hands that are unwashed, it’s all of those other things too.

Your fault? Theirs?

We’re all equally culpable.

Because all we have to do is wash our hands and nothing happens. No illness, no time off work, no loss of income, nothing. No reason for anyone to sue.

Unless of course we’re responsible for the things we touch.

Then Number Two, it’s our negligence – failing to protect people from germs caught off objects  we didn’t keep safe. Not cleaned, not disinfected, the equivalent of not washing hands all over again. Well, who does wipe down the lift call buttons and sanitise every telephone handset at least once every day?

Except that’s fixable too. By sterilising the lot – and the actual room they’re in – by misting the place up with ionised hydrogen peroxide. Reaching everywhere, all viruses and bacteria are oxidised to nothing, destroyed, dead.

At a stroke, all the “touchables” and the environment they’re in are safe and free from germs.

Bad habits?

We still have them of course. Always posing for selfies. Wearing trainers at work. Two twists of sugar with our flat white.

But nobody’s likely to sue us for them.

Picture Copyright: halfbottle / 123RF Stock Photo

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi. Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead. The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 3 March 2019 @ 1:00 am

Originally posted on 3 March 2019 @ 1:00 am

If soap won’t hold against Coronavirus or Ebola, should we burn the place down?

Burning houseThey didn’t have soap when the world-wide Plague first hit in 1348.

Not unless you were landed gentry and brought the stuff back from Italy or France.

Are we going to die?

Nobody knew about hygiene or anything, so if you caught the Plague it was a death sentence.

Ebola is a virus. So is COVID-19, the coronavirus.

The Plague was, and is, a bacterium – yersinia pestis. It’s still alive today in various parts of the world – like the south-western US.

And way more deadly.

Virulent as it is, the World Health Organisation puts the average survival rate from Ebola at 50%. Scary, but far less lethal, US studies put the current Cornavirus mortality rate at around 3%.

But if you came down with the pneumonic form of the Plague, you’d be lucky to make it at all. Mortality averages at 95% or higher. No wonder they called it the Black Death.

The clean revolution

Today of course, we know about hygiene and keeping things clean. Which means controlling vermin and their parasites too – ie, the bacteria-carrying fleas on the rats that brought the Plague to Europe throughout the Fourteenth Century.

We also know about social distancing – keeping our distance from each other and choosing to self-isolate.

Half of Europe died in that first pandemic. And again, right through to the Seventeenth Century. No soap, no hygiene – so Britain was ravaged repeatedly.

Rescue by fire

Until the Great Fire of London stopped it dead in its tracks. By which time Black Death had killed half the people. Up to 7,000 a week died in the months leading up to that catastrophic blaze. Which made burning it all down one of the biggest hygiene levellers in history.

So should we get out the matches to stop Coronavirus or Ebola?

Surprisingly, good plain old soap and keeping ourselves clean stops a lot of bugs getting to us already. Without dirt and slovenly habits, even Ebola finds it more difficult to get traction.

But just as people were ignorant about germ defence in the Fourteenth Century, so our heads are in the sand about serious protection in the Twenty-First.

Both Coronavirus and Ebola can be stopped, totally – before they even get to us. Because like all viruses and bacteria, it cannot survive being oxidised.

How to fight back

OK, we can’t exactly fumigate the whole planet. But must of us in temperate countries live indoors. And we can mist up enclosed spaces – especially where larger numbers of us congregate – office buildings, schools, hotels, restaurants.

And the super-oxidiser that works best for this is hydrogen peroxide.

Right now, we have the machines and the know-how to mist places up. Ionising them as it happens, to boost spread and reach. With an electrostatic charge, so it reaches out and grabs germs as it finds them, ripping their cell structure to bits.

Slightly more effective than soap. And less devastating than reaching for the matches.

You’re still right to be worried about Coronavirus and Ebola.

But before anything happens, it IS possible to do something about them.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 8 July 2018 @ 9:29 pm

Originally posted on 8 July 2018 @ 9:29 pm

Bigger than coronavirus. Push antibiotics, or face world famine. Dump them, or face world obesity.

Girl makes chilling choice
Not a choice any of us wants to make – but this is now, and we have to

Forget all you ever thought about antibiotics being medicine. Here’s a crunch issue bigger than any we’ve ever faced.

Bigger than a global pandemic, bigger than thermo-nuclear war, maybe even bigger than a massive asteroid strike.

Already impossible to stop

It’s a crunch we face now, with repercussions going on for the next 30 or 40 years. All caused by antibiotics – or more accurately, our own shocking misuse of them.

Because, no, no, no, not medicine. Around 80% or more of world production goes into agriculture. Shovelled into plants and animals in industrial quantities – as the most phenomenal quick-acting GROWTH BOOSTERS of all time.

And we mean phenomenal. Bigger, better, faster – a money-making miracle too.

50 years ago, when the growth boosting side-effects of antibiotics were first discovered, the world’s population was 2½ billion. And every inch of farming land was flat-out, producing food to feed them. Even then, it wasn’t enough. There were shortages, with millions going hungry.

Today, our world population has swelled to a whopping 7½ billion. But the world hasn’t got any bigger. The planet is still the same size as it was 50 years ago. THREE times the people feeding off exactly the SAME land space.

Impossible?

No.

Because the miracle difference is antibiotics, particularly in the last 20 years.

Growth boosting by numbers

Amazingly, just by boosting animal and plant growth worldwide, the same land can now support a population that’s THREE times bigger.

But it’s not going to stop is it?

By 2050, world population will be bursting at the seams with a massive 9.7 billion of us – rising to 11.2 billion by 2100.  Numbers in Africa alone are expected to double – reaching 4.2 billion by the end of the century. That’s the same as the entire world population in 1977, barely 40 years ago.

Which means don’t expect the use of antibiotics in agriculture to slow down any time soon. With ANOTHER 3.7 billion of us to feed  by the end of the century, factories are going to be blasting round the clock to keep pace.

It’s going to be with all the regular antibiotics our doctors know and love too. Trimethoprim, oxytetracycline, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, cefotaxime, doxycycline, sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, clarithromycin and ofloxacin are all regularly used by the JCB-load.

And not just the regulars, it’s the emergency ones too. Even colistin – regarded by medics as the ultimate medicine of last resort – was being pumped into pigs at 11,942 tonnes per annum at the end of last year.

There’s only one problem.

Antimicrobial resistance

With that kind of consumption, currently around 240,000 tonnes a year,  the bacteria they’re being used against have had ample opportunity to develop resistance. Already, so many have developed immunity to antibiotics, that doctors are now looking at an Armageddon where ALL of them stop working.

And here’s the crunch. Well, Crunch 1, at any rate.

Thanks to this antimicrobial resistance (AMR), the world-wide move to limit antibiotics in agriculture is gathering ground – a tadpole going up against a whale.

Because it’s not going to happen is it?

Pull the plug on antibiotics in agriculture and suddenly there’s not enough food. Enough for only 2½ billion, not the 7½ billion we are today. Which means 5 billion people are going to go hungry. TWO THIRDS of the world population.

Famine on a scale never seen before. And what government, anywhere, is going to want that on their hands?

Like it or not, antibiotics are a train we cannot get off. Which means thanks for jumping up and down, Doc, we’re going to carry on as is.

The “bigger” problem

Which brings us to Crunch 2.

Only this time, Doc, you’re not jumping up and down enough. Not nearly enough.

Because right now, thanks to antibiotics, we’re also staring at the biggest medical crisis of all time.

Two thirds of adults are already at the start of this slippery slope. So are one third of children. And it all comes back to why antibiotics are used in agriculture – they make living things fatter.

Since we’re all chowing down food that contains the most phenomenal quick-acting GROWTH BOOSTERS of all time, we’re getting fat too.

Which means serious obesity. The kind that leads to type 2 diabetes, heart disease or cancer. A slow motion disaster of misery and death.

All triggered by antibiotics. Which all of us – unknowingly – are already on. A low background dose in every food we eat – meat, fish, vegetables, fruit. Milk too. Even the water we drink.

Impossible, surely?

Over-absorption

Think again. Surprisingly, farm animals only absorb around 20% of the nutrients they eat. The rest is excreted, to become the manure that fertilises plant crops and enriches the soil. Rain soaks it deep into the earth, leaching through into our rivers.

So we’re getting the antibiotics alright. In sub-therapeutic doses with every meal, just like the 19 billion chickens, 1.4 billion cattle and 1 billion each of sheep and pigs that currently feed us.

And if antibiotics can boost metabolisms from an egg to full-grown roasting chicken in 6 weeks – or from new-born calf to Aberdeen Angus sirloin steak in 16 months instead of four years – what are they doing to us?

Yeah, maybe we’re fat like the gurus tell us, because we lounge around playing computer games all day, glugging Coke and pigging out on pizza. And sure, that kind of couch potato lifestyle has got to have an influence.

But ask yourself, how come so MANY of us have got so large in the last 20 years? The same time period that antibiotics in food production have ramped up Big Time.

Those phenomenal growth boosters are working on us too, through the food we eat – and we’re paying the price.

Which means, face it – we’re going to get fatter and fatter. And lumps of lard, we’ll all fall victims to too much nutrient intake – making ourselves candidates for diabetes, heart disease, cancer and worse.

It doesn’t happen to the animals, their lives are too short. Which is why there’s no scandal or outcry, the issue is invisible.

But us humans have decades ahead of us. Plenty of time for the slow, debilitating effects of obesity to take hold, for the complications to set in, ready to drag us down to an unpleasant and premature death.

If in doubt, panic

Crunch time, world wide. In an epidemic that has crept up on us with such stealth, our watchdog heavies have yet to respond to beyond the odd rumblings about sugar tax and collectively throwing their hands up.

But yes, it’s happening – and two thirds of us are already on the slippery slope.

It will keep happening too, even if antibiotics are removed altogether from medical use, because they don’t work. Our daily dose will come through in our food and drink, continuing to overstimulate our absorption processes.

We won’t even know it’s happening, till we tip the scales further than we ever used to – and waistbands somehow expand larger than we ever dreaded.

Even going vegetarian won’t avoid antibiotics exposure, because the damage will already have been done. Jump-started by antibiotics fed to us for childhood ailments – fat by the time we’re five, with an even fatter future on the way.

So there we have it. Crunch, crunch.  Famine or obesity.

Pandora’s Box

And it’s our own fault too. We opened the Pandora’s Box of antibiotics by our own choice. We wanted to go bacteria-bashing and failed to think through the consequences.

Now we have no options. The issue is too big to address because we’ve never learned – all nations together – to unite in the face of a common cause.

Unless we do though, we’re going to wind up either very hungry – or big, bulky and helpless, like the dinosaurs.

The end is nigh. Not from coronavirus, but something infinitely bigger.

Picture Copyright: fizkes / 123RF Stock Photo

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 26 March 2019 @ 11:30 pm

Originally posted on 26 March 2019 @ 11:30 pm

Stop germs at work and save thousands. Ignore them and risk millions – even going to jail

Man in jail
Germs don’t just make you sick, you could wind up in jail too

Protecting staff health is a real money-maker. Neglecting it can mean two years in jail.

So what’s it going to be?

Like, stop people coming to work with colds and flu because there’s no germs to catch – and you could boost productivity by as much as third. Three months extra work, all for the same pay.

But gloss over checks on your water system for the bacteria that causes legionnaire’s disease – a notifiable disease, which means super-dangerous, you’re in trouble if they finds signs of this in your prem – and you are going down, baby.

Not good for your health

A criminal health and safety record, no more company directorship, unlimited fines, two years porridge. More if a staff member dies, and manslaughter charges stick.

Didn’t know germs were that important to business, huh?

Better wise up.

Get familiar with the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974. Plus the Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations controlling health and safety at work.

Not forgetting the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 2002 – germs can be just as deadly as asbestos, toxic fumes or any other hazardous chemicals.

Not that your staff are exposed to any of them.

But they might be.

Since germs are too small to see, you  can’t say what they’re exposed to with any certainty.

Fixing the downside

You can see the effects though.

Workaholics determined not to lose a day’s pay, they drag themselves in with churning tummies and pounding heads. Sick as dogs but intent on being heroes. Not really capable, but going through the motions, And passing their germs on to everyone else in the process.

Except you’re savvy enough to add office hygiene to the daily cleaning routine. So together with regular vacuuming and wipe-down, you have the place sterilised overnight as well. All viruses and bacteria sent to oblivion, so your staff start safe in the morning.

Full of beans, ready to go at full power – with all capabilities in play that you hired them for. Plus the motivation of feel-good. No germs, no problems, an unstoppable drive to success.

Yeah, well. Duty of care and all that. You know how to make it pay off.

The price of not caring

Compare that with shrugging it off – never needed anything before, so why start now?

Ask G4S Cash Solutions.

When one of their workers went down with legionnaire’s disease, the local council launched an investigation. No legionella assessment on their site for three years, 200 people at risk, they threw the book at them.

£1.8m fine for water systems safety breaches. Very nearly a jail sentence.

Which means mess with the wrong germ and it can cost your business plenty.

Because G4S aren’t the only ones.

£300,000 each for cider-maker HP Bulmer and water contractor Nalco in 2008 after two deaths in Hereford.

Manslaughter charges for JTF Discount Warehouse for three deaths in Stoke-on-Trent in 2012.

And countless other fines up and down the country.

Avoidable – and profitable

Not worth taking chances, hey?

Reckon there’s always germs there. Take action to eliminate them  – and laugh all the way to the bank.

Easy-peasy. Not rocket science. And a Get-Out-Of-Jail-Free card

Picture Copyright: bowie15 / 123RF Stock Photo

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 17 May 2019 @ 10:54 pm

Originally posted on 17 May 2019 @ 10:54 pm

Worse than Coronavirus? Then you don’t want to know about Ebola!

Infection fear
It’s ourselves we should worry about, we’re more dangerous than any germ

(First published about two years ago, this post is as relevant today as it was back then. With a difference. Though it’s not a pandemic like Coronavirus, Ebola is far, far, more dangerous – with far, far, more deadly results. The rules are the same though. Don’t take chances. Like Coronavirus, with a killer like Ebola, it’s basic hygiene such as washing your hands that will probably save you life)

Here’s a harsh reality check for you.

Unlike Coronavirus, if you die of Ebola, it’ll be your own doing.

No it’s not a pandemic – at least not yet. But you know it’s a deadly disease, so if you put yourself in the line of fire, the consequences are entirely yours.

Deliberate suicide

So what do they call that, self-inflicted death?

Suicide, right? You’ve committed suicide.

And it wasn’t Ebola that did it, it was you. By your own volition.

Ebola just does, what Ebola does. And exposing yourself to it goes one way. You knew that, before you started, but you did it anyway.

Makes you think about those volunteers who are out there fighting the disease, right? Médecins Sans Frontières , our own NHS people, British armed forces – and the selfless folk from a whole stack of other countries, doing their humanitarian best.

Heroes every one of them. Because they risk suicide to do what they do.

They know they could die. But they do what they do for the sake of others.

How careless can we be?

Not like the rest of us. Here in the UK, we reckon Ebola is far away and can’t get to us. But Coronavirus did. Climbed on a Boeing with a bunch of us coming back from holiday – and bing, we’re lucky we haven’t all got it.

And still, every day we take stupid chances. We know they’re stupid, yet we take them anyway. And the odds are reversed with Ebola. With Coronavirus, there’s a good 80% chance we’ll survive. With Ebola, there’s a hard 80% chance we’ll be dead.

Makes you think, doesn’t it?

We’re not actually thinking suicide at the time, we’re just being lazy.

But those are the stakes, we’re playing with our lives. And we do it through sloppy hygiene.

Want an example? Look no further than a handshake. Not the how of it, the contempt of it.

“New research has revealed that just 38 per cent of men and 60 per cent of women wash their hands after visiting the lavatory.”

Disgusting, yes. But more than that, seriously stupid.

Because every single one of us knows the importance of washing hands after going to the loo. We know what happens if we don’t – that we could make ourselves seriously ill. We know it could put us in hospital.

We even know we could die from it.

Yet we carry on anyway, not thinking for a second that we just risked suicide.

Exactly the same as painting a target on your chest and walking onto a shooting range. Seriously, utterly stupid.

Unnecessary risk

Because you don’t see the Ebola mercy-workers taking chances like that – and they KNOW the chance they’re taking. Or the amazing NHS workers around the country who are doing everything they can to keep us alive.

They’re ready with the meticulous scrub-up, the personal protective equipment donned under the watchful eye of a trained clinical observer: scrubs, overalls, apron, boots, double gloves, medical mask, respirator, goggles, surgical cap.

Then the UV tunnel, the chemical checks, everything. A whole careful code to be followed in scrupulous detail.

And still they can be unlucky. One unguarded moment, one second of diverted attention – and a needle-stick changes their lives.

Yet how many of us stare at the mirror in the loo – check the hair, the face, the way our clothes sit – and walk out without touching a tap?

A deliberate needle-stick moment, right there.

It was you!

Yes, deliberate.

Pleading forgetful is just making excuses. We’re just too lazy and we know it.

So how many of us actually do walk out of the loo – to come down with some medical nasty? Norovirus, diphtheria, MRSA, take your pick.

We don’t go looking for Ebola. Or Coronavirus. But we sure as hell get what we deserve. (Tweet this)

Or worse, pass it on to somebody else by shaking hands, offering coffee and biscuits, handling the office phone, or simply standing too close.

Sloppy hygiene. Ugh.

So why aren’t more of us dead?

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 30 August 2018 @ 8:32 pm

Originally posted on 30 August 2018 @ 8:32 pm

Luvvy-Duvvy Dentist Saves Lives

Indian beauty
Pulsed ultra violet – protection against pathogens in seconds

Blame British Airways. It was their sirloin steak that collapsed the tooth filling at 36,000 feet.

The very next chomp brought agony at 2.00 in the morning as the side of the tooth broke off onto the plastic plate.

Four more hours to Mumbai. With the paracetamol from the cabin attendant doing nothing at all. A pounding headache and cheek swollen out like a puffer fish.

Hurry up and wait

Murder at the airport. Ten hours to get a passport stamp, though it could only have been ten minutes. The hotel sent a car, hooray. Except the driver spoke no English – happy-happy cruising like we had all day.

Not nice to die at sunrise – in a strange place, thousands of miles from home.

Except the manager was brilliant. One look and he reached for the phone.

“Emergency please, doctor luvvy-duvvy.”

A mistake, surely. Or an unfamiliar Indian name.

Doctor Lavi Davi, that seemed about right.

The manager spun the driver round and shoved him at the car. “Jaldi karana,” he yelled and slammed the door.

No cruising now. Lewis Hamilton on steroids. Schoolkids, bikes, bullock carts, buses – all the people on the planet crammed into the single road ahead. No need for pain-killers, just triple double tranquillisers.

Another ten minutes that felt like ten hours.

The Empire sleeps on

Quieter side streets. A crumbling wall. A short dusty driveway to a broken down colonial relic of a house from the days of the Raj.

Doctor Luvvy-Duvvy in big letters on a purple signboard.

Out of the car in a cloud of dust. Through a crowded waiting room into air conditioned coolness and a waiting dentist’s chair.

The door shut.  Ah, sanity!

A big 4×4 pulled up outside. A flashy designer job for climbing up on pavements. Mercedes or Porsche or something. This would bend the debit card.

A nurse set up the chair. Flashy was right. The latest recliner model with all the goodies. She set up the splash-bib and Health & Safety glasses. Just like home.

“Doctor will be here now.” She nodded at the car outside the window.

A vision stepped in. Straight from a Bollywood movie. Poised, elegant and drop-dead gorgeous.

She pulled a purple smock over her head. The heart-shaped badge said Luvvy-Duvvy.

“Doctor Geetha Khan,” she said. Melodic, like wind chimes. “Let’s take a look.”

Silky smooth, surely a goddess. “The hotel said it was life or death.”

The gentle dental touch

Her fingers were careful, bred to handling crystal. The touch was confident. She knew her stuff.

Another ten minutes. Ten hours for discomfort. Ten seconds while this magical creature worked her miracle. Pain gone, swelling gone. Relief at being human again.

“Thank you, thank you, thank you.” It couldn’t be said enough.

She smiled. The whole world sighed.

Sitting up, slightly giddy. “Please tell me, I’m new to your country. Why Luvvy-Duvvy?

The smile broadened – somewhere the light shone brighter and flowers opened their petals.

Ultra violet germ killer

“Over there,” she pointed to a grey box on wheels, the Luvvy-Duvvy badge big across its front panel. “We named our practice after it – it saves lives.”

Luvvy-Duvvy?”

“Come.” She took my hand – instant, irreversible love.

Back into the crowded waiting room, the nurse coming too. The Doc-goddess had a remote in her hand. She pulled the door to, not quite closing it.

“Watch.”

Reflected purple light flickered off the wall panels inside.

Pulsed ultra-violet,” she said. “This is a hot country. People come straight in off the street, bringing all manner of germs. Take your chances outside, operating theatre inside.”

She nodded at the door. “Luvvy-Duvvy for the UV. That thing sterilises my operating room before and after every patient. Five minutes, bang.”

She pushed open the door. A long glass tube was subsiding back into the machine. “No viruses, no bacteria. I work with people’s open mouths every day. No infections on my watch.”

The crowded waiting room was watching.

“Please excuse me, this is a busy day,” she said. Wind chimes again. “Enjoy our country while you can. Just don’t chew on that side for a day or two.”

A miracle place, India. Can’t help loving the place.

Luvvy-duvvy me.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 28 July 2018 @ 5:55 am

Originally posted on 28 July 2018 @ 5:55 am

But does your cleaning service get rid of germs?

Biz exec on phone
Germ-free in the workplace – the BIG difference between clean and safe

You’ve seen your cleaning service in action, right?

Working late, in comes the swamp-out team, embroidered polo shirts and latex gloves – all very efficient.

And sure thing, cleaning is what they do. Harry vacuum cleaner on a long lead, waste bins emptied into black plastic bags, desks wiped down with a J-cloth.

An hour tops, and they’re out of there – wham, bam, thank you ma’am.

Oh yes, and once a month they clean the windows, wipe the sills and straighten all the pictures.

Looks clean, but germs are invisible

OK, so the place looks clean, but appearances aren’t everything. And doing anything further is outside their remit. You want clean, you get clean.

Except that wall where the busted rainwater pipe cascades down the outside bricks?

There’s damp coming through and mould beginning to show – right next to where the top customer service team hit the phones all day. Experienced experts with heavy pay cheques, but always one of them down with a cough or sniffle.

Call facilities management, right. But they never answer the phone. No joy anyway, with the manager always off in Lanzarote, Ibiza, or wherever. Nice for some.

Meantime you have to wonder. Windows shut against the cold, warm air gusting down from the air-con duct. Stirring up the germs and everybody breathing the same stuff. How safe are your people anyway?

OK, there’s two of them expecting and most have had their flu jabs. But how about the tummy bug that floored  six of them last week? Not a good time to be off, and the office is still playing catch-up. A big dip in the figures when you least expect it.

Germs everywhere – a business hazard

Oh sure, the cleaning service do their job.

But by now the realisation’s hitting home that clean does not necessarily mean safe. Maybe it LOOKS clean, but there is a duty of care to all staff. And nobody wants illness to punch holes in their bottom line.

So, germs. Where do you start?

Google it, and you’ll find the average desk has over 10 million germs at any one time.

And there’s more in the air. Together with our own personal germ clouds that all of us have. That’s 80% of the room space teeming with potential health hazards. Invisible of course because they’re too small to see. But you’ll know all about it when absentees start happening.

Fortunately, there is immediate protection you can ensure. And easy enough for your cleaning service to bolt on as part of their regular package.

First they tidy up and clean like normal. Then they let fly with their germ-busting kit.

If you want to work late now, better take it home with you. It’s not harmful and that stuff that’s used is mild, but getting rid of germs requires eye protection and a breathing kit. No need to suffer irritation unnecessarily.

Germs to oblivion

That’s because the germ-buster of choice is hydrogen peroxide. Ionised to spread evenly as a dry, super-fine mist through the air in all directions – hard up against walls, ceilings and floors, reaching under and behind, deep into cracks and crevices.

Ionising also charges every particle. Causing them to reach and grab viruses and bacteria – all of which are oppositely-charged. The particles clamp to them like magnets, ripping them apart by oxidising them. Shoving oxygen atoms at them that tears apart their cell structure.

Around 40 minutes is all it takes. To generate the mist, disperse and activate – reverting back to harmless oxygen and water afterwards. In that time 99.9999% of ALL germs are annihilated – in the air, on surfaces, around all objects, everywhere.

No viruses, no bacteria, no fungi or mould either – though the landlord will still have to fix that pipe.

The small amount of water quickly evaporates – no risk to electrical connections and computer cables- leaving a microscopic layer of colloidal silver as a lasting germ barrier. The room is now safe to a Sterility Assurance Level of Log 6.

Easy-peasy? You bet.

All it takes with the Hypersteriliser machine is wheel it in, hit the button, and let everything happen automatically. With clever circulating, the cleaning service could clean and sterilise your whole place in not much longer than they do now.

No germs anywhere. Clean, secure, safe.

Your employees ought to like that. So should your balance sheet.

Put it to your cleaning service. How about it?

Picture Copyright: dolgachov / 123RF Stock Photo

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 7 April 2019 @ 4:04 am

Originally posted on 7 April 2019 @ 4:04 am

Productivity: how most British businesses are standing on the brake

Employee Health Protection
Not healthy – businesses spend a fortune on accelerating productivity, but peanuts on taking the brakes off

OK, so we’re lagging behind if you believe the Office for Budget Responsibility. Not keeping up, hanging onto our shekels, not investing in the future.

Doesn’t look like it with the new start-ups making the headlines. New ideas, new technology, the front-runners are showing the world.

Across the board though, there’s no doubt performance could be better. Bigger, more established businesses are not so quick to jump in the gaps – and too many cut corners with low income immigrant labour.

They might look like they’re trying to go places, but the fact is that pretty well all of them are standing on the brake. Holding back, without even knowing they’re doing it.

But as winter draws in and the days get colder, the evidence becomes more obvious.

The first sneeze, the first sore throat, the first coughing attack in the office. A team member gamely pushing themselves at their desk, determined not to give in to whatever bug it is – common cold, H3N2 Aussie flu virus, MERS, SARS, or any one of a billion possible illnesses.

No protection against germs

And that’s the clue – being unwell at work. Trying to keep going, but feeling like death warmed up – at what kind of capability level? 60% of their normal? 40%? 25%?

Under-powered performance and under-powered concentration. So the work load suffers and accuracy with it. Lots of good intentions, but unwell staff are unable to deliver their best – which means productivity can only take a dive.

And how long will it be before other team members start coughing too? Everyone sharing the same work space, breathing the same air, touching the same things – it’s going to happen isn’t it? What goes around, comes around – a setback is almost inevitable.

Which is what we mean by standing on the brake.

Because what do most businesses do about protecting staff from colds and flu – or anything else for that matter? A company flu jab, maybe – and that’s your lot.

And how about prevention?

It’s winter – so expectations  are high for norovirus,  the vomiting bug, to appear. What measures are taken against that?

Or legionnaire’s disease, a pneumonia-like killer that spreads through the air via the HVAC system? Neglect that one and it can cost millions in health and safety fines, as G4S Cash Solutions found out.

What about duty of care?

Also on top of the health risk, other hazards like mould and damp can trigger a £5K spot fine. Or as one charity found out, £12,000 in compensation and six months of expensive renovations.

That’s in addition to the 30 other notifiable diseases listed by Public Health England – along with 60 notifiable organisms that present a significant risk to human health. 90 illnesses any business is liable for if found negligent in duty of care.

All of which are expensive oversights to make. But a drop in the ocean compared to on-going unwell-at-work costs and the impact of under-performance on productivity.

Because unlike time off for sick leave, which for most people is just 6 days a year according to the CIPD – being unwell at work is likely to be 10 times that at 57.5 days a year, almost three working months.

Three working months of under-powered performance. And that’s for EVERY team member – from the lowliest apprentice to the top-ranking CEO – because we’re all human. No wonder productivity is less than it could be!

And the cause?

Germs holding us back

Sure, we’re exposed to germs all the time, so some of them may have come from outside.

Reality is though that we spend 90% of our time indoor, particularly in winter – and most of our waking hours are spent at work. So it’s no surprise our workplace is where we’re exposed the most.

On top of which, because we can’t see germs, we don’t imagine we’re at risk. We LOOK clean, therefore we are. But again in reality:

There’s another dimension too. Germs are so tiny, they’re airborne most of the time. And around 80% of any room space we work in is air.

We might clean our workplace thoroughly, scrub every surface within an inch of its life, but there’s no way to scrub the air. And in a study prepared for the Wall Street Journal, germs were found to spread from the front door handle to more than half the office in less than four hours.

Up in the air – and waiting

Uh huh, the air. We share it, we breathe it, we move through it – and all the time we’re immersed in germs, surrounded by them, constantly in contact.

Sometimes we fall victim, sometimes we’re lucky. We get something and throw it off quickly, or it has us seriously out of action for several days. We’re at constant hazard, yet how many businesses provide protection against it?

Surprisingly, nobody thinks about it, accepting getting unwell as a fact of life. Productivity with the brake on, even when money and technology are trying to accelerate it.

Yet releasing the brake is easy. Mist the place up with an effective biocide like ionised hydrogen peroxide, and ALL germs are eliminated in under an hour depending on room size. Throughout the air space, across all surfaces, and into all the nooks and crannies too.

Back to 100%

And with no germs to catch, there are no illnesses to fall victim to. Those three lost working months are restored, with team members able to perform at full capacity all the time – 33% more than they could previously.

33% better productivity.

The brake is well and truly off – there’s nothing to hold back from a rapidly brightening future.

Full throttle – look out world!

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 24 November 2017 @ 3:21 pm

Originally posted on 24 November 2017 @ 3:21 pm

Hallo Captain – the cruise ship norovirus handshake BC (Before Coronovirus)

Boxer lady
How do you do? Yes ma’am, I’ve washed my hands

Fist bump, not hand clasp. Or maybe elbow taps.

And the Cunard cruise line has actually banned contact altogether.

No more courtesy greeting gestures, the Captain is officially off limits.

Shaking off sickness

Norovirus paranoia has finally spoken – with recognition that the bug is spread by physical contact.

Hence all the hoo-hah about alternative greeting actions, like fist bumps.

Fist bumps?

Er, no. For a classy £5,000-a-head swank-arama cruise on one of Cunard’s Queens, a “hey dude” greeting like a fist bump doesn’t exactly fit the protocol.

Not any ordinary cruise line, right?

Like, for a company currently celebrating 175 years in the No 1 slot of high society leadership, where’s the tradition and ceremony?

Because the time-honoured ritual of shaking hands is not just going through the motions, it’s a centuries-old signal of peaceful intentions – open demonstration that no weapon is threatening, the meeting is non-hostile.

Kind of important to a cruise line where the Captain is always in dress whites – you can even imagine a ceremonial sword too.

And you’re not a pirate.

Fist bump? Not on his watch!

Norovirus hysteria

OK, so the story has hit the headlines – and norovirus is the bad guy, again.

Notice how carefully everybody steps around the real issue behind ANY norovirus issue.

Somebody’s got dirty hands.

Uh huh.

Which is why all the nonsense with fist bumps – the norovirus handshake.

Not good enough, Jim – the stuff spreads on contact. The only way to be virus-free is the Ebola handshake – no contact means NO CONTACT.

Oops!

Denial, denial, denial

As if any of your top rank dowagers are going to admit dirty paws. Or any of your high-flying millionaire business types either. Dirty hands are dirty hands – exactly the same for celebrities and nobodies both. A revelation about white gloves for ceremonies, isn’t it?

And anyway, fist bump – where does that come from?

Pro boxers squaring up in the ring before a fight, that’s where – since the early 1900s. Legends like Joe Louis and Jack Dempsey. Shake like gentlemen and come out fighting.

Yeah, right. So your intentions ARE warlike.

You want to beat someone up – AND you want to pass on your norovirus – our modern take on the age-old insult “you make me sick”.

Reality check

Because, make no error – norovirus IS the Don’t-Wash-Hands Disease.

You don’t get it from something you’ve eaten or dodgy hygiene in a restaurant. Not always, at any rate. Truth is, that is probably rarer than you think. Though restaurants always get the blame. For every one finger pointing, there’s always three pointing back.

Nine times out of ten it’s germs from your own unwashed hands that give you the stomach bug. The burger you chowed on during the shore excursion – or a close relative.

Puts a whole new perspective on food labelled “Gastro” doesn’t it? (Is it guaranteed to give you gastroenteritis?)

Because if we’re honest, when was the last time ANY of us washed our hands? A whole morning? A whole day?

And how many times have we been to the loo in that time?

Enjoying ourselves on a cruise ship – cokes, margaritas, milk shakes. Let’s not kid ourselves – that’s at least two diversions for a sprinkle.

Ew!

Down and dirty

And you ate that burger with your fingers?

Makes you queasy just reading about it, hey?

But there’s an answer. One that none of us seem to WANT to accept.

Denial is easier, it can’t happen to me.

Until the first cramps happen – the first upchuck.

There ain’t no immunity – and this stuff spreads like wildfire. But there is protection – we do have a defence.

Soap and water – easy.

Yet we run scared in denial, like vampires from garlic.

We even KNOW germs make us sick, yet still skip scrubbing up.

Masochists, right? We must want it to happen.

Unless of course, it’s enforced. They can’t make us do it at home – but they can at sea.

Safety Drill

ATTENTION PLEASE, THIS IS YOUR CAPTAIN SPEAKING – ALL PASSENGERS MUST WASH THEIR HANDS BEFORE COMING ABOARD.

Aye, aye, Cap’n sir.

And instead of the norovirus handshake, maybe we should salute.

After all, issuing that order just saved us from the Don’t-Wash-Hands Disease.

Disobeying it at sea is mutiny – risking the death penalty.

And that’s true.

Yup, get real. Norovirus is as common as the common cold and kills 200,000 people every year.

So over to you – it’s in your hands now.

Back Off, Bacteria! is the blog of Hyper Hygiene Ltd, supplier of what we’re convinced is the most effective health protection system in the world. A fully mobile, all-automatic Hypersteriliser machine mists up workplaces with ionised hydrogen peroxide, spreading everywhere and eliminating all bacteria, viruses and fungi.

Hypersteriliser units are supplied to businesses and institutions across the UK, notably the haematology and other critical units at Salford Royal Hospital, Greater Manchester; Doncaster & Bassetlaw Hospital; South Warwickshire Hospital; Coventry & Warwickshire Hospital; and Queen Victoria Hospital, East Grinstead.

The Halo Hypersteriliser system achieves 6-log Sterility Assurance Level – 99.9999% of germs destroyed. It is the only EPA-registered dry mist fogging system – EPA No 84526-6. It is also EU Biocide Article 95 Compliant.

Originally posted on 25 October 2018 @ 11:24 pm

Originally posted on 25 October 2018 @ 11:24 pm